87th Annual Meeting of the National Council for the Social Studies 51st House of Delegates

November 30, 2007 and December 1, 2007

San Diego, California

Female Speaker: Madam President, Gayle Thieman, will begin our meeting in two minutes. Please be seated, close the doors, the House of Delegates is about to come to session. We still don’t have Syd up here. We don’t have Michael. Michael, Syd. Where? Syd’s not here, Michael’s not here. Okay, don’t worry about it. Just start. We got her. Do I introduce her before she? Do I introduce her, does she just come and start? Okay.

I’d like to now introduce Gayle Thieman, President of the National Council of the Social Studies. Would you welcome her please?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Good afternoon. I just came from a very inspiring keynote session. I know that you have also had wonderful experiences today. Our sessions are packed. The exhibitors are thrilled. And I’ll be speaking more about that in a minute.

But I just want you to know that the House of Delegates has always been a highlight for me, of the conference. Twenty years ago when I first came to my first NCSS conference, I was a delegate from the Alaska Council for the Social Studies. And I remember standing up to make a resolution and it had something to do with having Alaska be represented correctly on the map, since we were always somewhere south of Hawaii. And I ran out of time and somebody from Texas yielded, so I could continue my presentation. I was so inspired and excited by the process of being part of democracy that even when I wasn’t a delegate to HOD I came anyway and sat in the back. So this is truly an exciting opportunity for us to make policy decisions and policy recommendations to the Board of Directors. You are so important in what you do.

I would now like to introduce the folks on the platform. And I’m going to start with Tina Heafner, who is incoming chair of the Steering Committee. Our own Executive Director, Susan Griffin. Our Steering Committee Chair, Peggy Jackson. And Kim Goldsworthy, our Parliamentarian. And I think the other members who were supposed to be sitting up here are probably walking the mile from the other sessions.

I’d like to remind you that the agenda is printed in, on page five of your manual. And I’d like to hear a motion to approve the agenda please. It was, been moved and seconded. All those in favor of adopting the agenda. I’ll wait for you to get to the page. All those in favor of approving the agenda, please say aye. Those opposed? Any abstentions? The agenda for the 51st House of Delegates has been approved.

Just to review, for those of you who may not have participated before, and we do have guests who I think Peggy will be speaking about shortly. The purpose of the House of Delegates is to provide all the members of NCSS a way to participate in developing the policies of this organization. HOD serves as a forum for issues relating to our profession and the organization, the council. And this forum most frequently takes the place of resolutions and the discussion of resolutions. It serves as the business meeting of the organization and is a way for the president to give the State of the Council address, which is going to be very brief today. And it provides an opportunity for resolutions.

And I want to just explain to you that resolutions are the means by which our Affiliated Groups, and next year our Associate Councils and Communities can alert the NCSS Board to pressing issues that need to be addressed. HOD resolutions provide very important guidance to the Board of Directors. We take these resolutions very seriously. We will spend much of our meeting in February reviewing those resolutions and taking action on them. And we give a full report back to the House of Delegates Steering Committee so that you know how we have responded. So I want to now introduce Patty Hutman, the chair from the El Paso Texas Council of the Social Studies. She’s representing the Credentials Committee and she’s going to read our committee report.

I think we need to get Patty. All right. We’re moving along. We’ve got a very tight schedule today. And shortly I’ll turn the meeting back over to Peggy.

Normally we have the, the House increases in size as the afternoon goes on. Tomorrow morning it will be critically important that you’re here promptly at 8:00 to start business because we will need to adjourn promptly at 10:30 for our next speaker.

I also want to say thank you to those of you who serve in the House of Delegates, some of you year after year, because it’s a sacrifice. There are outstanding sessions going on right now and you’re willing to give up those important professional development opportunities for yourself in order to serve the organization.

Since it’s going to take a few minutes, may I just go on with the State of the Council? Okay. I will just simply say that registration is approaching four thousand attendees. That’s our magic number. We had thirty five hundred prior to the conference opening and we’ve had about four hundred people come since Wednesday. Four thousand is the magic number. So you’ve got to know, use all your powers of influence. I want, I’d really like five hundred people to walk in tomorrow morning and register and maybe we’ll get that. But we are very close to our budgeted amount. And you all know, those of you who have been coming to NCSS year after year, this is the strongest financial support for the organization. When we have a successful conference, then we are able to meet our budget and also fulfill all of the programs and activities.

You know that NCSS governance is changing and we have some exciting initiatives that are coming to implementation because of the work the House of Delegates did to approve changes. Jeff Passe is the Chair of the Governance Transition Implementation Committee. He was very much involved, along with Tim Daly, yesterday in a three hour training session for Community and Committee chairs. More and more, the work of this Council goes on all year long, not just the once a year when four or five thousand of us get together at the conference.

We have twenty five thousand members that need to be involved and engaged in the work of this Council all year long. And the Communities are going to provide that opportunity, and the Committees. And using our emerging technologies, wiki’s and dedicated webpages and we call it base camp, Tim has helped many of the Committees do their work with that particular program. We’re doing our work all year long.

So the Communities met, and the Committees met, for training. We also had Community and Committee meetings going on and there’ll be Community Roundtables. There was one this afternoon and there’ll be one again tomorrow morning. And that was your opportunity to find out some of these Communities that you might like to join.

Also, our Associated Groups are busy, Associated Groups, CS4, and NSSSA, CUFA and IA. They’re working to modify their bylaws so that they will have the opportunity to send voting delegates to the House of Representatives next year and that’s really an exciting development.

Credentials is ready, so I will step aside for Patty Hutman.

Patty Hutman, TX, Credentials Committee, Chair:
I’m Patty Hutman. I’m the Chairman of the Credentials Committee. And as Chair of the Credentials Committee, I am pleased to report that one hundred and sixty nine delegates are registered and certified to vote in the House of Delegates as of our time right now, which is five minutes to four, today Friday, November 30, 2007. And I move the adoption of the Credentials report.

Male speaker:
So moved.

Female speaker:
Second.

Patty Hutman, TX, Credentials Committee, Chair:
We have received a second.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
It’s been seconded. All those who are in favor of approving the Credentials Committee report please say aye. Opposed? Abstained? The Credentials report has been accepted. Thank you.

Patty Hutman, TX, Credentials Committee, Chair:
Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
And now I’d like to turn the program over to Peggy Jackson, Chair of the Steering Committee.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Good afternoon and welcome to the fifty-first House of Delegates. I am excited to be a part of this year because the House of Delegates is truly a work in progress. In 1953 in Buffalo, New York, New Yorkers, John Hefner had a vision of creating a democratic body for this organization. In 1956 in Cleveland, Ohio, the first House of Delegates met and since. I’m loosing my sound. And since that time. I can yell it. And since that time, in 1956 the House of Delegates has met continually until this year our fifty-first year. At this time, all of the Affiliated Councils have been a part each year of the House of Delegates. Technical difficulty? Thank you so much. Is that better? Thank you. And for the first time, this fifty first House of Delegates has made three firsts.

The first first if you can follow me, is that we have with us today, not only Affiliated Council from our states, but also Associated Groups and Communities who are here. And I would like to recognize them at this time. Would you please stand? We’re welcoming you to the House of Delegates. Thank you so much. And we hope, we look forward to Houston ’08 when you will participate as voting delegates in this organization.

The second first of the House of Delegates this year is that when we met with Steering in April, we really wanted everything to be delivered to you as delegates electronically. And we asked could this be done? And NCSS staff broke all records to get every single thing sent to you electronically. And I would like to thank Ana, and Courtney, and especially Susan for her direction for this first.

Finally, and finally, we experimented last year with electronic voting. We found it helpful for resolutions and this year all votes will be taken electronically, votes for the House of Delegates’ three committees and votes for our amendment and votes for our resolutions. So we also have accomplished in the fifty first House of Delegates being completely electronic. Thank you.

And speaking of electronics, would you please turn your cell phones off or to silence at this time so that we can proceed with business?

One of the things that the Steering Committee does is that we look at the evaluations from the year prior. I took these home on the plane last year and carefully tabulated every single word that anyone of our delegates last year said. And we used all of those evaluations and comments to shape our committee today. And I would appreciate it if you would at least find this. We will be collecting these tomorrow at the end of session two. But you need to know where they are in your packet and how important they are in framing what we do in this organization in this session.

At this time, at this time, at this time, I can do this. At this time, I would like to put into order the House of Delegates committee nomination form. These will be collected at, they are due by 4:35. Thank you. Is it a solo mike? Can I just take it off? These are due at 4:35 this afternoon. And they will be done in triplicate. You can review in your packet exactly how these forms will need to be done. They need to be written. The eligibility information in each packet will be presented. We will go over that clearly this afternoon and the voting will be done tomorrow. The introduction of those of you who wish to vote for, excuse me, wish to run for Steering, Resolutions or Assignment Committees will be introduced today on the floor. The person nominating should keep the pink back sheet and the candidate would bring the white and yellow sheet to the front. This happens at 4:35 today. Are there questions?

Then at this time, I’m pleased to ask Gayle Thieman to continue to present her State of the Council address. Gayle.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Another aspect of governance is the constitutional amendment that you will be voting on this House of Delegates and then again next year. You may recall that we passed a constitutional amendment before for allowing electronic voting, an online ballot for NCSS officers. So we did amend part of the Constitution. The only problem was there was another, there was another section of the Constitution that refers to a mail ballot and so we have to continue the process. So we’ll be doing mail balloting for a little while longer as we go through the process that now takes two years to change the Constitution.

Part of my role as President is to visit your state conferences. I’ve had a wonderful time this fall visiting five states, my original home state of Alaska as, and also visiting in South Carolina, Arizona, Florida, Washington, and I missed Oregon. But I’ll make it up to them, I promise. I’ll be doing paybacks for the rest of my life. However, what I was so impressed with is the dedication, and the energy, and the excitement of these state councils. They care passionately about social studies. They’re critically concerned about advocacy. And many of them are teaching the rest of us how to get their members engaged.

I just want to talk about South Carolina for a moment. They have six hundred and sixty people at their conference. And I don’t know how many of them they got to write letters, but they were very concerned about decisions relating to assessment and they asked each one of their conference attendees to communicate with their congressional delegation. They had the information at the conference about the delegates. And they had bullet points. And once the person actually wrote the letter, they got a free t-shirt.

Now NCSS quite, can’t do it quite that but we do have information available on our website, and we can include information for you on how to find your congressional delegation if you’re not certain. And we have information that we feel is critically important that you communicate immediately to your congressman and senators. And that has to do with the cutback by the administration of funding for the National Assessment of Educational Progress. NAEP is the only nationwide assessment in social studies. And we have fought hard over the last few years to get the schedule of testing for social studies enhanced. We wanted social studies, we wanted more of the subjects, civics, economics, geography, U.S. History, World History. We wanted those assessed more often, at more grade levels, to more students. And now with the proposed budget from the administration, we’re going to move backwards. And that’s not good because we don’t have enough data to disaggregate by states to show a true picture of the impact of No Child Left Behind on what’s happening across the nation. So that is our latest advocacy effort.

The Board of Directors, Susan Griffin, in partnership with our educational lobby, Washington partners, has written a number of letters to Congress. They’re on our website. You are free to adapt them. And we really need you to be participating with us in coming years just as strongly as you have this year.

I want to compliment the staff, particularly Courtney, who is new to NCSS, for the e-mails that she sends out to the State Council Affiliate Network. All of you have the opportunity to be part of that network. I urge every state council to have a legislative liaison, somebody who, besides the president, pays particular attention to this e-mail information and then shares it with all the rest of your members in the state because that’s how we get action. And I remember Peggy Altoff, who just walked in, our past president, who said, it only takes eight messages, only eight e-mails, only eight phone calls for a staffer of your congressman or senator to pay attention. And as I’ve been saying throughout my presentations at state councils, take five minutes for advocacy, five minutes a week is all it takes. So I encourage you to participate with us, continuing our advocacy focus.

I just want to compliment the staff, and all of you, for an outstanding Summer Leadership Institute. We had more people there than we ever have had before, seventy five delegates from the states and, and local council affiliates. And we made hundreds of hill visits. And that is incredibly important.

I would also now like to call your attention to the importance of reaching out to those people who are not in your state councils and who are not members of NCSS. We had a hundred and fifty first timers show up at the First Timers Breakfast this morning. And they came from all across the United States. They’re your new generation. It’s very important that you find out. We can easily share their e-mails with you, who is, who the first timers here from your states that you would like to invite into your council. As well, we have NCSS members who aren’t invited, who are not members of your state councils. But we also have people in your state councils who are not members of NCSS. Please, please invite them to join you in NCSS membership. Remember the campaign we started many years ago, Each One Reach One? And to quote Peggy again, it’s the power of relationships. You are the ones who are making those personal connections to invite the next generation of our teaching profession to join us. Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
I’d like to introduce, at this time, the Steering Committee. Tina Heafner from North Carolina is, thank you, is my Vice-Chair and she will be chairing this body next year. Keith Dauer, would you stand please? Keith, from Connecticut. Robert Dytell, Bob, please stand wherever you are. There you are. You are. I did see you. Thank you. Laurie Graham from Indiana and Tara Sides from South Carolina. Thank you Steering Committee.

Now I will go back to the order of business. Are there questions to Gayle Thieman from any of the information that was delivered just now in the State of the Council address? Okay, then we accept that wonderful report Gayle. Thank you.

I have the privilege now of introducing the other two committees of the House of Delegates. First, I would like to introduce Christine Allen, Chair of Assignments. Christine is from Oregon and she will introduce her committee and her recommendations for this body. Thank you Christine. Would you please welcome her to the podium?

Christine Allen, OR, Chair Assignments Committee:
Okay. Before I introduce both our members of the committee and our recommendations, I would like to encourage each and every one of you to go back to your councils and get young enthusiastic teachers to apply to be on committees. It is important that we expand beyond those of us who’ve served on committees. And the five committees that we make assignments to are Operations committees: Archives, Awards, Conference, Government Relations, Publications and Membership. Membership is of course, well they’re all important. But it is very important to have lots of candidates be involved.

Now it’s my pleasure to work. Is this going to work? Yes, no? Yes. All right. Members of our Assignment Committee: Susan Davis from Nevada. Is she here? Good. Dwight or Doc Holliday, Kentucky. All right. Marjorie Hunter from Arkansas. Can you hear me without this? Good. Gloria McElroy, Tennessee and Robert Nimtz, Illinois.

And we have some interesting discussions. Thank you. We have some interesting discussions of where to put people who apply. Oftentimes they only ask for one committee. And it was amazing how many people wanted Conference Committee or Membership Committee and not some of the other ones. All of the six committees are important. And so after some discussion and conversation and e-mails, this is, these are our recommendations. For Archives: Barbara Shallu from New Jersey and Cynthia Resor from Kentucky. Either of those people here? Okay. For Awards: Sarah Justice from Colorado. Is that now working? Sarah Justice from Colorado. Yes, there she is, good. And Jenna Stant from Tennessee. Tennessee here? No. Okay. Conference Committee: Michelle Antonucci from South Carolina and Kevin Kuschel from Wisconsin. And I apologize if I’m butchering names. Either of those two people here? For Government Relations: Rob Fetters from Ohio. And Sea Latham from California. Membership: Amy Volerio from North Carolina and Benjamin Snedeker from Ohio. And Publications: Lisa Shoanburger from Pennsylvania and Judith Schechter from New York. And we appreciate their willingness to serve on these committees. And again I encourage you to get new young people to apply. Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
This is working? Is this working. Is this working? Do I have a working microphone? Is this working? Okay. This is working. At this time, before I introduce the Resolution Co-chairs. I would like to explain to you that you are about to get a new set of resolutions. If I could ask my Steering Committee to deliver those at this time. This committee has worked extremely well. At Summer Leadership, nineteen resolutions were written by the largest number of attendees at Summer Leadership. Those have been edited for, not for intent but simply for clarity. And this after, yesterday and today several of those who seemed to be duplicates have been combined. If you worked on a resolution at Summer Leadership, I would ask that you would please, if you have questions see the co-chairs of the Resolution Committee.

You have a set of resolutions, of eighteen resolutions. As soon as we have finished. At this time then, I would like to introduce the co-chairs of the Resolution Committee. Mike Benefiel from Maryland and Greg Timmons from the state of Oregon. Thank you.

Mike Benefield, MD, Co-Chair, Resolutions Committee:
As I name the members of our House of Delegates Resolutions Committee, I ask them to stand and remain standing. And I ask you, the distinguished delegates of the House of Delegates to hold your applause until I have named all six. Greg Timmons and Lois Wolfe. Terry Cherry and Margo Byerly. Rosalyn Fishman and Jaguinne Reynolds. Would you please join me in thanking them and welcoming to the microphone Greg Timmons?

Greg Timmons, OR, Co-Chair, Resolutions Committee:
I don’t want to touch this thing. I’m not sure it’s going to keep working. Thank you Mike.

Many of you were in Washington, DC last year at the 2006 national conference where this body met and voted on many resolutions. At the end of that meeting, members of the Resolutions Committee laid out a plan to prepare for the 2007 Summer Leadership Institute and subsequently the 2007 national conference. Letters were co-signed by the chairs of the Resolution Committee and also the Steering Committee were sent to state council presidents to encourage them to discuss with their council members ideas for new resolutions. I know several of you joined us at the 2007 Summer Leadership Institute, as already been mentioned, and where a very talented and very hardworking group of people, got together and developed the resolutions, most of the resolutions anyway that you see presented here. This group presented a very strong set of resolutions and they were also made available on the NCSS website. After Summer Leadership the Resolutions Committee worked throughout the fall reviewing the proposed resolutions and finalizing our work at the Resolutions Committee meetings here just in San Diego a few hours ago. This is where we categorize the resolutions according to the House of Delegates Manual Article IX, Resolutions, Section III. The article sets the order for the presentations of resolutions at the HOD meetings and provides provisions for evaluating resolutions and executing the process.

We also held a hearing this morning to accept any new resolutions. And we received a few of those and those are included. All of you were given a copy of our work. Now some of you have been through this process before many times and for some of you it’s first timers. To echo Gayle’s words at the beginning of the meeting, I want to gently remind all of you that the resolutions before you were crafted with much care and commitment and they deserve our careful thoughtful consideration. And we are going to read the titles and the intent of each resolution today and then tomorrow we’ll be voting on those. If I can be so bold, or, as to state that your homework assignment is to review these resolutions very carefully. I will turn this back to Mike who is going to begin the process.

Mike Benefield, MD, Co-Chair, Resolutions Committee:
Resolution, resolution 07, for 2007, 01, for the category for business resolutions, number 1. The title is No Child Left Behind Action Plan for NCSS Advocacy.

BE IT RESOLVED that the NCSS Board leadership will develop proposals for specific changes to No Child Left Behind legislation which will ensure the inclusion of social studies in the educational mandates of No Child Left Behind.

Resolution 07-01-2: Support for the National Assessment of Education Progress Assessments in Core Social Studies Disciplines.

BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies, the NCSS membership and the council’s Board contact their Congressional representatives to request that funding for NAEP assessments assures that those related to No Child Left Behind designated core social studies content areas are administered according to the original schedule.

Resolution 07-01-3: NCSS Early Childhood Education Position Statement Update Committee.

BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies convene a body to develop a new position statement on social studies for early childhood education.

Next, 07-01-4: Fostering Effective Communication Among Social Studies Communities.

BE IT RESOLVED that in order to improve the quality of social studies teaching and learning in every classroom, the NCSS, national, state, regional, local councils, and special interest committees, communities relating to social studies will open a clear dialog between these diverse groups through joint endeavors including conferences, publications and or sponsorships to better address a theoretical, practical and standards based approach to the teaching of social studies. Greg.

Greg Timmons, OR, Co-chair, Resolutions Committee:
Can you hear me? Okay. Good.

Resolution 07-01-5: Joint Membership Recruitment.

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED NCSS provide state councils with electronic membership information quarterly and further,

BE IT RESOLVED state councils provide NCSS with an electronic copy of state member database for joint membership recruitment only.

Resolution 07-01-6: Support for the Development of the Revolving Membership System and Process.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS provide and aid state councils in the development of a process that will allow revolving membership enrollment and renewal.

Resolution 07-01-7: Support for Increased Pre-service Teacher Recruitment.

BE IT RESOLVED that the NCSS Taskforce on Underrepresented Groups actively recruit and initiate partnership with institutions of higher education to increase membership of people from underrepresented groups.

Resolution 07-01-8: Trial Membership Program.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS explore the development of a three month trial membership program for members of the targeted population who are identified by affiliate organizations or nominated by NCSS members.

Male Speaker: On Demand Professional Development.

BE IT RESOLVED the National Council for the Social Studies convene a body to investigate the research design, implement and evaluate online anytime, anywhere professional development programs through streaming video for effective social studies instruction in an area of standards based learning and high stakes testing.

Resolution 07-01-10: Federal Support for Social Studies Professional Development.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS encourage Congress to include ample and diverse professional development opportunities with adequate participation incentives and employer support to strengthen the knowledge and skills of teachers.

Resolution 07-01-11: Regional Conferences.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS explore the possibilities of regional conferences in areas far removed from the location of the national conference when other alternatives do not exist. And,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that such offerings include RFPs to affiliate councils, revenue sharing and promotional assistance.

Resolution 07-01-12: Regional Council Assistance Teams.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS encourage the development of regional council assistance teams by calling on individuals in each region with talent and expertise in key areas of council development to assist states councils in need of support.

Greg Timmons, OR, Co-chair, Resolutions Committee:
Resolution 07-01-13: Impact of National Council’s Conferences on States and Regions.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS Board of Directors explore additional mechanisms to minimize the financial and leadership impact of national conferences on host states or regions.

Resolution 07-01-14: NCSS to Encourage and Support the Establishment of Legislative Liaisons at the Affiliate Level By Providing Training at National Conference.

BE IT RESOLVED NCSS should encourage and support the establishment of legislative liaisons at the affiliate levels who will monitor critical issues and engage in proactive media and public relations in a timely manner as they relate to educational policy and programs that impact social studies education by providing training sessions for the legislative liaisons at the annual conference facilitated by NCSS staff.

Resolution 07-01-15: Increasing Awards Nominations.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS will encourage and assist state and regional councils in significantly increasing their applications for NCSS awards by creating a liaison with each council represented in the House of Delegates who will be responsible for publicizing, soliciting, and mentoring their state award winners or Programs of Excellence; by submitting articles throughout the year about NCSS winners and criteria for each award to individual state, regionals newsletter editors and encourage them to publicize awards; by encouraging states to recognize their state award winners at their state and regional conferences; by offering a training session for liaisons at the Houston 2008 NCSS led by awards committee members; by putting the video of some of the Awards of Excellence on line for potential applicants and other teachers to view; by soliciting other ideas from the House of Delegates, the NCSS Board of Directors, and state leadership for increasing applications of all NCSS Programs of Excellence.

Resolution 07-01-16: Support for the Continuation and Development of School Scholarships for First Time Attendees to the National Conference.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS should encourage state and local councils to contribute to the First Timers Scholarship Fund and/or institute similar scholarships at the local level in order to attract first time attendees to NCSS national conference.

Mike Benefield, MD, Co-Chair, Resolutions Committee:
Resolution 07-01-17: This is the last resolution in category one, the business of the National Council for the Social Studies. So we have seventeen in category one. Resolution Supporting the Chicago 2016, Twenty Sixteen, Olympics.

BE IT RESOLVED NCSS endorses Chicago’s effort to host the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. We encourage the NCSS Convention Committee and Board of Directors to seriously consider selection of Chicago to host the 2015 NCSS Annual Meeting.

Category four as specified in the bylaws deals with matters not directly related to the field of social studies that are political in nature.

Resolution 07-04-1: A Call for a Public Stand.

BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies urges its members and Associated Groups through publication of this resolution in Social Education, “The Social Studies Professional,” and other appropriate outlets, including the NCSS website:

1) To take a public stand as citizens on behalf of the values and goals taught in social studies and necessary to the practice of our profession, and

2) to do whatever they can to bring the Iraq war to a speedy conclusion.

This concludes the resolutions as submitted on deadline for the House of Delegates meetings of 2007. Tomorrow we will have a very limited amount of time to discuss and to vote on these resolutions. I would like to echo Co-Chairman Greg Timmons’ encouragement that you as the designated representatives of your state councils and communities take the time to read through the text and decide how you will discuss, debate, and vote on these resolutions tomorrow. Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
At this time, I would like to call for resolutions from the floor. Are there any resolutions to be presented to this body from the floor? I’d like to direct your attention to the HOD Manual, Article IX, Section V on Resolutions, that outlines the procedures for resolutions presented on the floor at this time. They are also on the screen. Kenna can you give us that screen? And then we’ll come back to. That side. Okay. Any questions? Any resolutions?

At this time, we will accept nominations. By HOD committees and these will be introduced in this order: Steering, then Resolutions, and finally Assignments. The introducer should introduce the candidate, the person whose name is being placed into nomination, and as they approach the microphone, drop off the top copy of the nomination form. For those of you who are introducing and nominating a candidate, would you please line up at the microphones?

Tara you may be. Right there, you’re at the right spot. [tape ends]

a very big deal, so. I present to you. He’s active and he’s a social studies supervisor. He’s a great guy.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
I’d like for you also to bring, remind everybody that, the names cannot go on the screen with correct spelling until you have given a copy of, one of those copies, I believe the pink copy comes to us. And I would appreciate that, you have those copies, the white and the yellow, you keep the pink. So if that has not been done, please do that before you speak. Thank you so much for going first.

Female speaker: Okay.

Greg Timmons, OR:
My name is Greg Timmons. I’m with the Oregon Council for the Social Studies. And I want to introduce Christine Allen. Christine is also with the Oregon Council. She’s just completed one year as OCSS President and has served as President prior to that time. She also served as Conference Chair on many times for different kinds of conferences we’ve held and has worked with, on developing our councils’ website. She has been a member of NCSS for thirty nine years and as a member of HOD for the past twenty nine years. She’s served as NCSS Board member and is also active in various other committees. Christine has taught high school for thirty two years and now works as an educational consultant. She’s work with High School Model UN for thirty three years. I strongly present Christine Allen here as a member for the Steering Committee.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Resolutions.

Gloria McElroy, TN:
Hi. I’m Gloria McElroy. I’d like to introduce Jeanette Stepanske. Jeanette is the President of Tennessee Council for Social Studies. She’s been a member of NCSS for twenty years and she teaches at University of Tennessee. She’s terrific and she likes me. So please vote for her. Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Yes. Very good recommendation Ms. Tennessee.

Gloria McElroy, TN:
Thank you.

Male speaker: Resolutions?

Gloria McElroy, TN:
Resolutions.

Susan Davis, NV:
Good afternoon. My name is Susan Davis from the great state of Nevada, not Nevada. And I’m here to nominate Stephanie Hartman who is currently our state social studies consultant, which is a first in probably like fifteen years for Nevada. She would be a great person to fill this Resolutions Committee. She works closely on the Executive Board of our Northern Nevada Council for the Social Studies. She’s a presenter. She’s energetic and she would, we encourage you all to vote for Stephanie Hartman of Nevada.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you. Are there any more nominations for Resolutions? Thank you. Go for it Mr. Goldberg.

Steve Goldberg, NY:
Hi I’m Steve Goldberg from New York. It’s my pleasure to nominate to the Resolutions Committee Bob Dytell. Bob is a veteran teacher, staff developer of social studies for the New York City School System. He’s past president of both ATSS/UFT, which is the New York City social studies council as well as the Past President of the New York State Council. He has participated in numerous Summer Leaderships, many sessions of the HOD and is currently going off the Steering Committee for the HOD and I think he would be a terrific member of the Resolutions Committee.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you. Are there any more nominations for Resolutions? Then may be please proceed to nominations for Assignments.

Teresa Mengerink:
Hi, I’m Teresa Mengerink and I would like to present Bill Harris for the Assignment Committee. Bill is a twenty five year veteran teacher. He is currently our vice president for the state of Ohio and has also served as a high school rep. He has been a member of our organization for over twenty five years. He’s a James Madison Fellow. He is involved in multiple state committees working on our model curriculum as well as helping to develop websites for our Ohio Social Studies Resource Center. Bill Harris.

Mark Previte, PA:
Mark Previte from the Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies. In the true spirit of crossing borders and building bridges, thank you, the Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies enthusiastically supports the nomination of our brother colleague Bill Harris from Ohio for the Assignment Committee.

Jackie Purdy, CA:
Jackie Purdy from the California Council of the Social Studies, your host state for this conference. It is our, my pleasure to present Merrill Frankel for the Assignment Committee. Merrill is an active member of both NCSS, SCCSA, our local council and CCSS. She has served on the Board of Directors for our state council for twelve years. She heads our social, we chair together our Social Justice Committee. She has served, a glutton for punishment, she has served twice as our local president, make putting us on the map again. She was Middle School Teacher of the Year for CCSS in 2003 and NCSS recognized her in 2004. She has served fourteen years in the House of Delegates serving on the Local Planning Committee for this conference. She is a Fulbright Award winner to Southeast Asia and New Zealand. She is a Korean Foundation Fellow. As middle department chair, she was responsible for bringing many teachers, young teachers, new teachers to both the state conference and NCSS, no matter where it was located. California wishes to continue its commitment to the service to NCSS and we ask you to vote for Merrill Frankel for Assignment. Thank you.

Eddie Bennett, GA:
I’m Eddie Bennett from the Georgia Council for the Social Studies, host of the 2009 conference. It is my pleasure to nominate Lois Wolfe for the Assignment Committee. She is past president of the Georgia Council. She served on the Executive Committee of the Georgia Council. She’s past president of the Georgia Leadership Association for the Social Studies. She’s been a Georgia Council for the Social Studies Outstanding Educator. She’s been on our conference planning committee. She’s been a presenter at the Georgia council. She’s attended NCSS conference for over twenty years. She’s a member, member of the Resolutions Committee. She’s served in the House of Delegates for many years, has been a presenter at NCSS. She has won the Cole International Teaching Award. She is an educator of thirty four years. She has her Ph.D. from Emory University. She’s been a teacher, a social studies coordinator and now a principal. She’s also taught on the college level. She has co-authored two teaching American History grants. She recently authored Students On Strike with Dr. Herman Viola. And she’s just a wonderful, wonderful person full of enthusiasm and energy.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
You go for it.

Steve Goldberg, NY:
Hi, it’s Steve Goldberg again from the empire state of New York. It’s my pleasure to put a nomination for the Assignments Committee, Mary Duffin. Mary has been an elementary teacher in the Syracuse, New York area for over thirty years. And she’s also been involved in working with pre-service elementary teachers in Syracuse University. She’s been the President of the Central New York Council for the Social Studies. And on the state level, she is the current Vice President of New York State Council and Past Secretary, Chair of our Elementary Committee and Chair of our Awards Committee. She has been named the New York State Social Studies Council Elementary Teacher of the Year. She has served, has attended seven HODs in the past and many of the Summer Leadership Institutes. And it’s my pleasure to place Mary Duffin in Nomination. Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you.

Nancy Gangan, NH:
Hi. I’m Nancy Gangan from the New Hampshire Council for the Social Studies. And I’m proud to nominate Ron Adams for a position in the Assignment Committee. Ron has been twenty two years as an officer of the New Hampshire Council for the Social Studies and twenty seven years on the Executive Board. He is our most senior member and most beloved. He served in the HOD six times and chaired the Assessment Committee here at NCSS. He has twenty eight years experience as a teacher in grades five through twelve. He’s been curriculum coordinator, department head, etc., etc., etc. It’s my honor to nominate Ron Adams. Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you.

Jane Eason, SC:
Ladies and gentlemen, on behalf of Charles Bond, the President of the South Carolina Council, I’m Jane Eason, Vice President. I would like to submit to you Justin Lovelace for consideration of this committee. At this time, I would like to see a smile if you are enjoying yourself at San Diego. Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thanks Jane.

Jane Eason, SC:
Now that I have your attention, I want you to know that we are especially advocating the under thirty five experience and perspective. Justin has been a consultant for the curriculum. He is a curriculum interventionist. He has been a district consultant. He has worked tirelessly on our state conference. He has been a presenter. He is an excellent staff developer. And again, he is under thirty five and we welcome a fresh new perspective. Thank you, Peggy.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you Jane. Just a reminder that this is the first order of agenda tomorrow. The doors will close at 8:10 and voting on these House of Delegates committees will be done at 8:15. When the doors are closed, no one will be allowed to enter until the voting on these three committees has been done. And it looks like today you have generated a wonderful list of candidates for these committees.

At this time, I’d like to announce that we are going to enter our Candidate Forum for candidates for the Board of Directors and for Vice President. And I would like to turn the podium over to my Vice-Chair, Tina Heafner.

Tina Heafner, Vice-Chair, Steering Committee:
It is with pleasure that I get to introduce Past President Peggy Altoff. Welcome. And she is Chair of the Nominations Committee and will be presenting our slate of candidates for 2008.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Most important announcement of the evening. I was just outside and the sun is coming out. I would like to have all of the candidates who will be speaking join the committee on this side of the, of the room. And we’ll begin in just a second.

Where to begin? Past presidents don’t go away. They’re just given new jobs. And so the past president for the last few years, as a result of a change, is the Chair of the Nominations and Elections Committee. And I was very fortunate to have a phenomenal group of people to work with. We had a first this year too. The work was not done in person. We did all of our work by conference call. And that was absolutely phenomenal. And it worked very very well. Rather than institutionalize that, we decided to give it a second try next year. And of course Gayle will be in charge at that point. And just to make sure that it really does work as well as we think it does. But we shall see.

This year we will be hearing from folks in these categories: At-Large College/University; K-12 At-Large; Middle; FASSE; and Vice President. And the Vice President will be speaking, Vice Presidential Candidates will be speaking last.

This is a plea to all of you. Anyone who has ever been elected to the Board of Directors probably has sat where you’re sitting and said, I am not worthy. I do not belong with this group. I cannot make decisions. And yet they have, and they do. Next year’s nominees will be in these categories. And I want everyone in here to listen attentively, to think about your qualifications and to consider running. Next year we will be electing a Vice President, a Secondary Teacher, someone from the Supervisory category, two At-Large Delegates: P-12 or Open At-Large and two FASSE candidates. The announcement will be in the “TSSP.” The nomination materials will be online and everyone in here is as vital in the decision making process at a higher level. Here you’re suggesting things to the Board of Directors. When you’re elected, you get to help make those decisions coming from the resolutions in this body. So please consider it.

Okay, the members of the Nominations Committee who worked so hard this year include Adrian Davis from Michigan, who was not able to be at this conference. Something about getting a promotion. So, but she was a contributing member. Phyllis Bowie from Alaska. Will you stand please? Crickett Kidwell from California. Fran Holleran from Florida. Oh, enough. Joe Gotchy from Washington. And Mary Ellen Sorensen from Massachusetts. And I don’t believe she’s with us this year either. I haven’t seen her at the conference.

So with, and we are going to begin with the At-Large Candidates who include: Tim Coates, Beth Ratway and Renay Scott. So if Tim is here, I would ask him to come to the podium. These candidates have three minutes to speak. And our timekeeper is right down here for all of you candidates. Go Bob.

Tim Coates, At-Large Candidate:
In Canada we’re metric and it’s a hundred seconds per minute I think. So just. My name is Tim Coates and I am from Edmonton, Alberta in Canada. And I am running for a position as a Member At-Large on the Board of Directors. Living across a border from the United States and having taken the U.S./Mexico border tour yesterday, I have a keen awareness of your border issues in both the real and the metaphorical sense. As a Canadian, I regard my candidacy as an opportunity for the NCSS to take a step forward in achieving the theme of this year’s conference, Crossing Borders, Building Bridges.

From prior experience with the NCSS, I have learned that social studies educators in our two nations share many commonalities, not the least of which is the desire to foster responsible and active citizenship.

Despite our commonalities we face unique challenges. Within my first year as a member of the Assessment Committee, that I learned is what is perhaps your greatest challenge, preserving the social studies in the era of No Child Left Behind. Your struggles are a topic I have used as a cautionary tale on numerous public speaking occasions in Canada. At the 2005 conference, I ran successfully for the position of Chair of the Assessment Committee, although ran might be an exaggeration given that there were three of us at the table. One was the outgoing chairperson and one was his first year on the committee. I can’t recall whether I won by a margin of one vote or two.

During my year as Chairperson of the Assessment Committee I was tasked, we were tasked, with the creation of an NCSS position statement regarding the status of social studies vis a vis No Child Left Behind. As you can imagine, I was hesitant having at least two concerns. First as a Canadian, was I qualified to lead such an undertaking? And I had great support, I must say, from American members of that committee in saying no, that’s not a bad idea. You’re an outside person, you can look at it from a different perspective. Got one minute. Okay, thank you.

And a second concern was what position did NCSS wish to take? That was probably pretty important. Overcoming these concerns, a draft document was prepared with the involvement of my American colleagues. The draft was edited at last year’s Assessment Committee meeting and after executive review became a public document this fall. The position that of seeking inclusion in the reauthorized NCLB is, I believe, pragmatic, but not without its problems, not least of which will inevitably be the quality of the assessments used to measure students.

In the province of Alberta, our new social studies curriculum is based on viewing historic events and contemporary issues through multiple perspectives in hope that students will come to appreciate the value of diverse points of view. Likewise, I hope that my election will broaden the perspectives of the Board of Directors, provide it with great international flavor and bring it and the NCSS a step in the right direction to truly crossing borders and building bridges. Thank you.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
It is my understanding that the biographical information on the candidates has not yet been distributed. Is that the case? Is it available to be distributed at this time?

Female speaker:
Yes.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Okay good. Two minutes. I should mention that although we have three candidates in the At-Large category, that we will be voting for one and during the elections in February. Okay.

If I may have your attention please. I’m sure you’ll be spending, spend some time matching the information with the candidates. But we’d like to proceed with the Forum if we might. And so I introduce to you Beth Ratway from Wisconsin.

Beth Ratway, WI:
Well now you know who I am so that takes care of one and a half minutes of my speech. I’m going to talk to you a little bit about my main goals and kind of what I’ve been doing in the state of Wisconsin.

My main goal as social studies advocate is to empower students to be engaged, global citizens. In order to accomplish this we need to advocate for social studies, synergize the disciplines of social studies and empower teachers with the content and pedagogy they need to help students become empowered, engaged, global citizens.

I’m concerned about the public’s perception that social studies is less important than other disciplines. As we know, social studies is the heart of the curriculum. The emphasis NCLB legislation places on math and reading is due in part to the historic divisions among the individual disciplines of social studies and the inability to find a common voice. I’ve been very encouraged by the formation of the working group of social studies disciplines and the joint statement on NCLB. But I believe more can be done to advocate for and to synergize the disciplines of social studies.

We need to work together to ensure others know why social studies is important. Advocacy is key. In Wisconsin, I have built partnerships with individuals and organizations within the content areas like NCEE, NCGE, TOPS, NCHE and their state affiliates. It is important to connect with groups outside the content areas also like ASCD, NSCD, NSBA and legislators.

As an organization we need to lead the nationwide support for social studies education. We need to work together to ensure that all students have access to successful social studies programs. Today, advocacy efforts focus on getting social studies as part of the tested component of NCLB. We all understand that what gets tested gets taught. But if we advocate for testing in social studies, let’s advocate for assessments that look and feel different. We need to promote assessments that are rigorous and relevant.

We need to advocate for funding for quality content based professional development in social studies. Teaching American History grants have had much more of an impact on students than any assessment. The grants have fostered conversations and developed partnerships with organizations, universities and LEA’s to offer quality content based professional development.

We need to help students be prepared for citizenship in the twenty first century by focusing on civic literacy, global literacy, and economic literacy. Using these as the overarching umbrella, we can clarify our purpose and honor perspectives from each discipline.

By synergizing the disciplines of social studies we can help teachers build a solid coherent curriculum. We need to work with teachers and students to show them how all of the disciplines of social studies are connected. The ten themes are our starting point. Students need to understand how to think like a historian, a geographer, an economist, a political scientist, an anthropologist, a sociologist and a psychologist. If a teacher is teaching U.S. History, they can get students to look at the Depression through the eyes of an economist, a geographer, etc. We need to synergize the disciplines by focusing our core concepts and themes and engaging students in the core tools of each of the disciplines of social studies.

I see these goals as steps towards the main goal of social studies education, preparing students to be active, informed, and engaged citizens.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Our third and final candidate in this category is Renee Scott from Ohio.

Renay Scott, OH:
Thank you. It’s nice to be back up here. Peggy, I’m glad you’re doing this. I decided to run as an At-Large member of the Board after spending last year on the Board because I was the Steering Committee Chair here for the House of Delegates Steering Committee. It was there at that experience that I began to realize, I really do have something I think I can give to the Board of Trustees. Commitment, organization, a strong critical thinker and good communication skills. I believe that my past experience as a president of the Michigan Council for the Social Studies, service on both the House of Delegates Resolution and Steering Committee, having chaired both committees, my continued work on the Governance Transition Team, and service on the FASSE Board have all given me a variety of experiences that I think can help me as I server on the Board of.

If elected to the Board, I would like to continue assisting with the Governance Transition. I want to continue to strengthen ties between NCSS and state councils, which I believe is very important. I would like to continue and broaden out my advocacy for social studies on a more national and even a global level. And I’d like to explore increasing the relevancy of being involved in the National Council for the Social Studies for underrepresented groups. To do this, I would like your vote and I really appreciate your consideration. Thank you.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Our next category this evening is College and University. And while we have two candidates, we have only one speaker, Eric Gross from North Carolina became a grandfather and therefore felt that being with his, his grandchild was probably more important than being here to give the speech. Oh. We certainly hope that you will give the information that’s been provided by Eric every consideration as you consider your vote this year. With that in mind, I’d like to introduce the second candidate, Cynthia Theisen.

Cynthia Tyson:
Good evening. I have a dog. Don’t start my time, please. I just like blew it now, okay.

Zora Neale Hurston, who is an African American anthropologist, writer and folklorist, once said that research is formalized curiosity. It’s poking and prying with a purpose. As a researcher, teacher, scholar, and academic activist, I stand here before you seeking your support for the open seat of College/University on the Board of Directors.

As in my candidacy statement, that you just got thirty seconds ago, and bio highlight, I am a former elementary school classroom teacher and currently associate professor in early childhood at Ohio State University. I also am the current Chair of the NCSS Social Justice Community. I know the importance of addressing formalized curiosity in early teaching and learning for our youngest citizens. It is there that the seeds for later participatory civic action are sown. If we are to reap the harvest of increased participation in this constitutional democracy, we must seriously begin to attend to the many local, state and national challenges that we face when teaching about social studies in the Pre-K through grade twelve and higher education settings.

If elected to the Board I will, in concert with you my colleagues, continue and extend my work, to work collaboratively supporting and critiquing social studies teaching and learning, practice and policy in this educational enterprise of school and policy making. My intent is to contribute with my areas of expertise: early childhood education, urban education, social justice, and educational research. And I’ll probably have a debate on You Tube tonight with my dog and about my candidacy. Thank you.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Our next category is the K-12 At-Large position. And we have two candidates. The first candidate to speak this evening is Peggy Jackson.

Peggy Jackson, NM:
Who is Peggy Jackson? I’ve asked five people for one word and I’ve received five different words. Effervescent, energetic, enthusiastic, compassionate. And my daughter’s word for me was passion because I, my passion is, as a We The People teacher, an AP-US Government teacher, an economics teacher, my passion is teaching seniors about the U.S. Constitution.

In order for me to make the transition from being a middle school teacher and department chair of twenty four teachers in an extremely large middle school in Albuquerque, New Mexico, I decided I needed to learn more about the United States Constitution and political science as I moved into government. And I was fortunate to have a colleague who introduced me to the Madison Fellowship. I am a Madison Fellow and I finally, four years later, received my MA in Political Science.

As a national board certified teacher, as a young adult, adolescent social studies teacher, my goal in my classroom is to teach students to think, not what to think. And I use a variety of strategies including Socratic Seminar and weekly discussions on controversial issues.

My experience in New Mexico has included being Past President of New Mexico Council for the Social Studies. It has included being named the New Mexico Social Studies Teacher of the Year. And this past year I was privileged to be the conference, regional conference chair of Rocky Mountain’s Great Plains in Albuquerque.

Who have I been? I’ve been a political activist in the sixties for civil rights and today an advocate for NCSS in the issues for which I stand. Three things that I advocate for: we must not allow our nation to marginalize social studies. As a K-12 candidate At-Large, elementary schools need so much, so much work in Congress to keep those fourth and fifth graders engaged in civic, civic education. I also stand for including underrepresented groups and hopefully more thirty five year olds involved.

After one year of serving on the Board of Directors and Executive Committee in this position, I think I’ve learned the expertise and seen the vast breadth of this organization. I hope that on the Executive Committee, I’ve also seen the dynamic things that have to be done. Give me a chance to represent you.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Our second candidate in the K-12 At-Large position is Mert Martens from the state of Colorado.

Mert Martens, CO:
Ms. Altoff misspoke. That’s the great state of Colorado. And I want to begin by thanking Peggy and the committee for their work. It wasn’t an easy task, I know. And they’ve done a yeoman’s job and should be, we should appreciate what they have done to come up with this slate of candidates for NCSS. I almost did NSSSA. Sorry about that.

I’m not going to stand up here and tell you who I am and what I believe for a couple of reasons. As I looked around the room, most of you know me and I know most of you. So I don’t have to do that background. Or I’m not compelled to do that background. The second reason is because I couldn’t say anything much different from what has already been said. The third reason that I’m not going to do that is because last year, I didn’t win. So apparently my bus and getting hit by the bus speech wasn’t what we needed to hear.

So knowing that I didn’t have the words, I called some people and said, you know, what, what should I promise the National Council for the Social Studies? And Barack Obama’s people said you need to promise to, you all laugh, you know, I need to promise to be all things to all people. And I will open the White House to all of you as soon as you elect me. The Hillary Clinton people said I needed to promise you universal healthcare. I’m a doctor but just like Jeff Passe, I don’t think we’re allowed to treat people. But you know, if you have a problem, come see me. So I knew that wasn’t going to do any good, so I went to the You Tube debates on Wednesday. None of the Colorado group would come through with a staged question for me. And so I was left to flounder by myself.

You know how important advocacy is. I, I don’t have to stand up and tell you that. And I don’t have the words to stand up and tell you how important it is. If it’s not in our hearts, and if we don’t understand how important social studies is, then we can’t be good advocates. And I’m talking to the choir. What I should be doing is being back in my district pounding on doors and so should all of us. Because it’s not simply enough that we write the letters to Congress, that we call Congress, and that, as Peggy Altoff continuously says, make those eight connections. We have to make those eight connections times a hundred or times a thousand. And most of us do that every day in classrooms across the country.

I ask you to support my candidacy for the Board of Directors. I would like to represent you in the position on the Board. If you do, thank you. If you choose to support someone else, the slate of candidates is a wonderful slate of candidates and I know you won’t make any decision. Thank you. Or a bad decision.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Our next two candidates are from the Middle School category. The first to speak would be Terry Cherry from Texas.

Terry Cherry, TX:
I didn’t know my family was here. I’m an eighth grade history teacher at Memorial Preparatory Middle School in Garland, Texas. I’ve been teaching since 1995. My credentials are like most of the candidates. I’ve served all of the local positions and the state positions. I am currently the President of Texas Council for the Social Studies. I’m active in the National Council. I’m on the Houston and Atlanta Conference Planning Committees. And I’m on the Resolutions Committee.

Two people referenced me one time, one said I was a servant and the other said I was occasionally irreverent. I think that’s accurate. To be a servant on the Board, you have to listen to the delegates, to our members, to their concerns, to their joys and to their fears. And occasionally irreverent, that means I ask questions. Why and what? Why are we doing this? What’s this all about? What’s behind this? Why must we continue? So I think occasionally irreverent and servant would describe me.

NCSS is like many organizations in this country. The majority of our leaders are one generation. A large group of our members are of another. I can remember when the term generation gap meant something in the sixties. We haven’t bridged that gap yet. My daughter is twenty six years old. Her commitment to an organization is different than why I am committed. NCSS needs to reach out to the twenty five and thirty five age educators and seek their thoughts. Why would a new teacher want to join this organization? I know it’s more than just a note on a resume. The attendance at our national conference is impressive, but will it be so in five to fifteen years from now?

At our state conference in El Paso, I hosted a meeting with pre-service and one to three year teachers and I listened. Listened to their concerns and their thoughts about our state council and what we could do to improve it and to reach out to them. All social studies educators are in a long battle receiving equal recognition for science, math and reading. This course of action must continue with new plans coming from our leaders of NCSS. Yet we must not forget the importance of continued growth within our organization. Gaining equality with other core subjects will mean nothing if we have no young members to represent NCSS.

NCSS is the lifeblood of social studies people. It needs all kinds of vitamins and minerals to keep it healthy. We have a history of overcoming many cuts and bruises. I choose to be a vitamin and mineral for NCSS. I need your help and your vote. Together we can continue to maintain a healthy NCSS, providing the lifeblood to all social studies people.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Our second candidate for the Middle School category is Karen Muir from the state of Maryland.

Karen Muir, MD:
An eighty seven year old friend has come from time to time to visit my class. She sits quietly in the back of the room just listening and observing. A series of mini strokes have severely affected her short term memory. But sitting in my eighth grade classroom, her long term memory is activated and all at once seventy five years have gone by and she’s a middle school student again. On the way home we have quite an animated discussion. And with amazing clarity and detail, she describes to me her middle school social studies experiences. It’s the projects that they did that she remembers the most. Then it was the discussions that they had. And it was the questions that were asked. It was the insights that she had. All of these things captured her imagination and made her a lifetime lover of social studies. All of us here today have similar memories of when social studies came into our lives, stole our hearts and set us on our path as social studies educators.

Now, I’d like for you to remember with me for another second or so about the power of multiple choice questions in your life. I, I would like for you to reflect for a moment about the tests that you remember the most, when in the choosing between A and D you said to yourself, ah social studies, this is the subject for me. I ask you this facetiously but there is a serious question behind it. In this era of high stakes testing, what will our students’ social studies memories be? Of course in the last seventy five years much has changed but much remains sustained. And the constant is that student that sits in that seat waiting to be inspired.

I’m Karen Muir. I’m running for Middle School representative because I can no longer sit in my classroom and watch as this subject that I care so much about is marginalized and minimized. I can no longer sit in my classroom and watch middle school curriculum be high-jacked by exit exams where my students are asked to analyze opportunity cost in ancient Egypt. Working together we can create and assure that we have a social studies instructions that our students will always remember and will treasure.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Our next category is the FASSE position, the Fund for the Advancement of Social Studies Education. And we have, we have two candidates but it appears that only one of them is with us tonight unless Alicia Sims is sitting someplace that I haven’t seen her, or the rest of us haven’t seen her. So again, I would ask you to give Alicia’s biography and statements. There’s nothing. That’s right, she didn’t submit them. So I’m not sure. No, it really isn’t funny because we have made every effort to be in touch with her. And if anyone here knows her because she did, she did agree to run, we certainly. I don’t want to make light of it and I apologize for forgetting. Not that any of us are busy here, but for forgetting that her position statements had not arrived in time to be placed in this packet. So it is regrettable to say the least.

All right, Joe. Joe Gotchy is our other candidate and he’s here to speak with you now.

Joe Gotchy:
Thank you, Peggy. Well, first of all, as a member of the Nominations Committee, I want to assure you that I did not nominate myself. Two years ago I ran for vice president unsuccessfully against Michael Yell. And Michael I have wanted to tell you this for a long time, but the phone call, the e-mail that you sent asking me to be part of your planning committee for Houston, I really appreciate that. That was really a classy move. Thank you very much.

I hadn’t thought about running again for anything. I love this organization but it just wasn’t in my future. And all of a sudden I get a phone call from a current Board member saying you really should consider submitting a packet for the FASSE position. And then I got a phone call from another Board member saying you ought to do that. And I have so much respect for these two people that I talked to my wife, got the okay and submitted the application material. And the more I thought about it, the more sense it made. In about 1975 I read N.L. Gages’ book, “The Scientific Art of Teaching.” And I’ve always seen myself as an artist in the classroom. But an artist who used research to inform his practice. And then I thought about the very best teaching that I ever did. And some of that was with teammates, like Bruce Larson, who when he was my teammate, an English teacher going to the social studies world, a Ph.D. candidate with Walter Park at the University of Washington. Every single day, every single week, every single month, Bruce and I talked about the latest research and how it could inform the curriculum that we were developing for our students. And the students were ultimately the beneficiaries of that research.

And then I started thinking about stewardship and legacies and what it is that people who had been associated with this organization, whether five, or ten, or thirty years, want to leave behind. And I thought, yes, I’m going to submit the materials and I’d be honored to be a FASSE Board member.

Gayle, I’d like to congratulate you and the thousands of members who put forth the money to reach the hundred thousand dollar goal. But sort of like the candidate before me, I ask tough questions. And I’d like to ask [tape ends]

Male speaker: Raise a half million dollars. A half million dollars that could be used for an endowment to ensure the kind of research that will benefit our profession over the long run.

What else? Well you don’t know it perhaps, but I met somebody that’s spying on us today. He’s from Yahoo. He’s here to see what we’re doing. He’s here to see what kind of research that we need to do a better job in the classroom. And he’d like to figure out a way to make a partnership with us. And I’m all about partnerships. Thanks.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Our final category is that of Vice President, and each person will speak for a maximum of five minutes. Before we begin, I’d like to remind you that the current Vice President runs unopposed and the current President-Elect runs unopposed for the next step up in their positions. So I would like to introduce to you tonight, Michael Yell, our current President-Elect from the state of Wisconsin. And Syd Golston is our current Vice President, who will be running for President-Elect. She was here earlier and I hope she still is, but may have moved on to another obligation. Pardon me? She went to the Awards Ceremony. I think most of you know her. She’s spent a lot of time in this House of Delegates in previous years. So now you know the history of that. So our two candidates are ready to present this evening and they come in alphabetical order. So Steve Goldberg from New York will speak first.

Steve Goldberg, NY:
Thanks Peggy. I’m very proud to say that I am a social studies teacher. And I feel lucky every day to have the opportunity to interact with my sophomores in a thirty three hundred student, New York, urban, suburban high school with no demographic majority. Think about that for a minute what that really means. It’s just an amazing experience.

I’m not going to bore you with biographical information because you have that before you. But instead I want to focus on three points. JFK once said that in order to set out on the road to success we have to know where we’re going, and before that, we must determine where we have been in the past. I think that’s a good mantra that we can use when we look at our own students. But I think that’s also a good mantra when we look at an organization.

It appears that the reauthorization of NCLB has been stalled in committee and will not be acted upon by Congress in this session. And who knows, in the amazing year of 2008 as we move towards the election of a new president. And so the current legislation, which I will remind you was a bi-partisan passed legislation approved in 2001, remains. And thus, so too remains our foremost task, to focus on our advocacy. And working with our sister organizations, and with Washington partners, we must continue our lobbying efforts with our legislatures, legislators.

Those who attended Summer Leadership this July heard me speak about what I feel should become the essential focus, that which we must concentrate on and bring to our policy makers in our states and nationally. And that is summed up in one important word, literacy. Yes, literacy. It is at the core of everything we do as social studies teachers every day. And I’m not talking about civic literacy, economic and financial literacy, or geographic literacy. No, I’m talking about literacy: reading, writing, and critical thinking.

As we teach our students to read, yes to read, documents, charts, graphs, political cartoons and maps, and as we instruct them on how to dialog with these documents, to analyze them, to research about them, and ultimately to write and to speak about them in proving a thesis, this is literacy. And literacy isn’t taught in a vacuum, and it’s surely not the exclusive domain of ELA, ELA teachers who are often more caught up in literary analysis, where literacy to them is the teaching of literature and literature is fiction. And my late wife was an English teacher. And this was an argument and battle that we had for many, many years. But we are the discipline that has the real mission. And we must share that with our policy makers. And yet social studies remains marginalized in parts of our country and we are in a position to campaign vigorously to bring social studies to the forefront of the literacy initiative.

Let me move on to another point. Membership. We are slowly increasing our membership. And it’s interesting, if you look at our membership statistics. Of our over twenty five thousand members, forty three percent are now under the age of thirty seven. I was astounded when I saw that data. But the question is, how many of them will remain. And our efforts have to be in retention. But what about the thousands of unaffiliated social studies teachers nationwide? I think this is all linked to now what we’re doing in terms of our morphing our SIGs and our Committees into online Communities. And I will work, as I have on the GTIC with staff and the Board of Directors to continue to bring this about. Because if we expand our membership to reach all areas of our country, the underrepresented teachers in both large and urban spread out rural areas we must promote the extensive use of the web as a vehicle for information dissemination and collegial interaction.

We’re not going to abandon our annual conference. But if we really want to move into the area as Peggy, as Gayle said this morning, to really look at the digital natives, then we’ve got to recognize that it’s the Internet, it’s cyberspace that is our future. Not that we’re going to give up what we’ve done, but we’ve really got to move into that. And if we are to survive in the twenty first century then that’s what we have to do.

I wish I could promise you the world, but I can’t. But what I can promise you, if elected, is that I will continue to work my hardest, as my proven record demonstrates, to create the means and the opportunities so that we can teach our students, yours and mine, that they can survive in a global community and better understand that world. Thank you.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
Our final candidate to speak this evening is Paul Horn from South Carolina.

Paul Horn, SC:
I think the operative word there is final, as in last, so we can move on with what we want to do this evening. I am Paul Horn. I have been fortunate to be up here as Chair of the Steering Committee and run the House of Delegates two years ago. It’s a very daunting task. But I tell you what, it was one of the most gratifying tasks that you could ever have. And I want to expand on that by being Vice President from NCSS.

I’ve been on the Curriculum Committee. I am presently on the FASSE Committee. It is wonderful to see the commitment that NCSS members have towards their organization. I am presently the Executive Director for the South Carolina Council for the Social Studies. Gayle mentioned earlier, six hundred and sixty people at our conference. She didn’t know how many letters were generated. I’ll tell you. Two hundred and sixteen letters were generated to the legislators from our membership in that advocacy to keep social studies in the forefront in South Carolina.

We are an equal player in South Carolina. We are equal with English/Language Arts, Science and Math. But we may be taken away from that position if the superintendent of education has that opportunity as he announced last year, to do away with social studies as an assessment. To keep social studies there, and the reason social studies is there to begin with, is because the business community of South Carolina spoke up and had it put in in the original education law in South Carolina. If I am elected as Vice President, I will work to work with the business community to get them on board, but it’s cause they’re pushing for either math or English/Language Arts or reading is oftentimes what the legislators hear. We need to get business behind social studies because economic development depends on the development of good citizenship. And that’s what business people are looking for.

The second thing I would like to focus on besides getting the business community behind social studies, is expanding the professional development opportunities that NCSS now provides. I was pleased to read the resolution regarding online and digitally. Whoa, boy that’s a word I can’t say this late. Professional development. And I think the publication of Digital Age was a great step in the right direction. But we need to help other teachers be able to develop those types of lessons. And you only do that through professional development.

The third point I would like to, to point out today, that I would like to run on is NCSS taking the opportunity to help its affiliated councils. South Carolina is fortunate. We have fifteen hundred members in a small state. Six hundred and sixty people come to our conference. We have endowments, we have a lot of things going for us. But we also have the ability and should use the ability to help other affiliates who need assistance. It might be that we need to think about having a leadership institute as part of our conference, in addition to the leadership institute that we have now in July. You can get a lot more people to be able to attend. You would have a lot more exposure to what the different things are that NCSS struggles with as well as get the affiliates to share ideas with each other.

You know it’s interesting. I work for a policy making board in South Carolina. And when we’ve listened to the arguments recently regarding eliminating social studies from the Accountability Act in South Carolina, math, science, English, all jump up and say how important they are. But the advocacy comes from the social studies, from a colleague of mine. You may know Lewis Huffman, who has coined the response to them that says, you know, not every child is going to become a writer, or mathematician, or a scientist. But every single child that we deal with is going to become a citizen. And it’s our responsibility to train those citizens. I hope you’ll give me the opportunity to help train those citizens across the United States. And mercifully, for all of us, the candidate forum is over.

Peggy Altoff, CO, Chair, Nominations and Elections Committee:
I want to thank you all for your attentiveness. And I particularly want to thank the candidates for their insightful, sometimes humorous, truly inspirational, and informative remarks this evening. Thank you again.

Female speaker:
Thank you Peggy for a wonderful slate of candidates. And look forward to seeing everyone vote in 2008.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
At this time, I’d like to officially read the report from the Governance Transition Implementation Committee/Team, to explain the change in the House of Delegates configuration that will be implemented at NCSS 2008 at the House of Delegates meeting in Houston, Texas.
1. Per NCSS Constitution Article II, Section VII. Associated Groups and Communities are now a part of the HOD. 2. This year is a transition year and Associated Groups and Communities were invited to send one non-voting delegate to attend both HOD sessions. And we are pleased that they are here today. 3. In 2008 at the Houston meeting, Associated Groups will be eligible to send delegates with representation based on the number of joint memberships with NCSS. Each of our Communities will be entitled to send a delegate as well.

I would now like to talk briefly about what the House of Delegates, what the amendment is that we’ll look at. Gayle talked about that earlier. And all that I would like to say is that the text, the purpose of this amendment is to allow for membership votes on amending the Constitution to be conducted by other means than a mail ballot. NCSS membership approved a similar amendment allowing elections for the Board of Directors to be conducted by means of anything other than a mail ballot.

If you’ll look at this pink sheet. This is the amendment. We will not read it at this time. We ask that you read it carefully and note that there are only two changes. There are, a change in Article II that has been deleted. And a change in Article IV in the third paragraph that has been deleted.

Also, I’d like to remind you that in order to amend the Constitution of the House of, excuse me of NCSS, that it does require tomorrow a two-third’s majority of the members of the House of Delegates before it can be submitted.

At this time, I’d also like to say that tomorrow’s vote, and remind you again, of the time. You may enter after the committees have been voted on. But for the voting of the amendment or for the resolutions, but we ask you to be prompt.

Finally, but not certainly last, I’d like to introduce Susan Griffin, who will give the list and recognition of Gold and Silver Councils. Susan.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:
Good afternoon everybody. It’s a great privilege to be here again. Now I usually have to do this in the morning. And it’ll be interesting to see if it works better now when I’m at the end of my energy, rather than before when I’m trying to crank it up.

But just to say that I have been with NCSS for a long time. And I’ve worked in Council Services, and as the Executive Director for a while now. And one of the great joys of my responsibilities is to attend local, state, and regional affiliate council conferences. And first hand I get to see what quality programs you have and how you strengthen social studies at all of those various levels. So I want to congratulate you on the work that you’re doing and thank you for being a team member with National Council for the Social Studies to advocate for our profession and for social studies in the curriculum.

I’d like to acknowledge the fine work of the affiliate councils by announcing the Silver and Gold Star Councils. First, the Silver Star. Arizona Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations. Our amazing. Could one person come up from the councils as I announce them? And Gayle’s going to give you your Stars. The Stars from California Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations and thank you so much for your help putting on this wonderful conference. The Illinois Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations on another Silver Star. One of my favorite local councils, Prince George’s County Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations, you’re a Silver Star Council. Michigan Council for the Social Studies, one of our stalwarts in the Midwest. And a place where we’ve gotten any number of wonderful Board members, Missouri Council for the Social Studies. New York State Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations. Thank you. And you bring your own photographer. I like that. Thanks Carolyn. Texas Council for the Social Studies. Yippee or yahoo. And of course this, the state where our President-Elect is from, Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations on your Silver Star.

Male speakers:
Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:
Pennsylvania. Oh, my God. I’m so sorry. Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies for the Social Studies. A Pittsburgher forgot. I’m sorry. Okay, I’m never gonna live this down. Okay, I just want you to. My Pittsburgh accent, I can feel it coming back to me right now.

Okay. Now the Gold Star Councils. This is really tough because you have to have all of the qualifications and build your joint membership, which is very hard to do. First is a local council, ATSS/UFT. Congratulations on your Gold Star. Colorado Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations. The amazing Florida Council for the Social Studies. And our hosts for 2009, Georgia Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations. I think that the current President is associated with the Oregon Council for the Social Studies, our Gold Star. And the wonderful and amazing South Carolina Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations on another Gold Star. Tennessee, you did it again. Congratulations, Gold Star. Thank you for your very hard work. And Pennsylvania, I owe you a couple of beers.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you, Susan Griffin. And congratulations to all of you who received that esteemed award.

Just a quick reminder that voting will take place tomorrow at 8:15 and that the doors will be closed at 8:10. And I would ask for Gayle Thieman to give us her final words before we adjourn.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Okay. One thing further is that we are asking the members of Gold and Silver Councils to remain five minutes so that we can get your pictures. Also, Steering Committee members will organize the group for their photo at the conclusion of our session.

I have some reminders, that we will begin at 8:00 tomorrow morning. We’re supposed to synchronize, not on my watch, but on my cell phone, that says. Well it was telling me the time a little while ago, 5:43. So it’s 5:43, which means we have two more minutes. And I want to remind those of you who are council presidents that there is a meeting of all council presidents tomorrow at 2:45 in the Hyatt-Emma A. For those that can come, we want to continue the wonderful collaboration that begins at Summer Leadership.

Also, I want to encourage you to enjoy all the wonderful receptions. NBC has asked us to make a special invitation to all of you for their reception that’s beginning now. But I also know many of you are going to Teacher of the Year. And then, don’t forget the President’s Reception at the Hyatt at 7:30. It’s my party and I want you to all come. And we are adjourned.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Our President is about to call us to order. You need to be seated. Good morning.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Good morning. Welcome to the second session of the House of Delegates at the 87th Annual national conference. I want to remind you to turn in this yellow evaluation form at the end of today’s session to your delegation chair. And then members of the Steering Committee will be picking them up. We want to make sure we get all of them. And now we’re going to hear from the Executive Director.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:
Good morning everyone. It’s kind of nice to walk from your hotel to the Convention Center, the sun is shining, there are seagulls. There are other people with their Starbucks coffee racing toward the Convention Center.

So, I just want to highlight a few things in my report. And I’d be glad to entertain questions. First of all, we had a very successful year last year. A couple of things were, of course, winding up in our favor. We had a excellent conference in Washington, DC. And our membership numbers which had been in a, very flat, had started to go up a bit. So we’re very pleased about that.

I want to say something about our membership marketing campaign. In the report you’ll see that there are many states that allow us to use their membership lists to recruit NCSS members. And one of the, and those lists are doing very, very well. And I suspect if we gave you the NCSS members in your state that are currently not members of your affiliate, that you could do pretty well also. So we’re thinking about ways to send you those, those names electronically. And we think that could be a, a very good mutual benefit.

We are changing, we will be changing our database system over the course of the next several months. Tim Daly, who is our Director of Administration, has received a number of RFPs. We sent out an RFP, got a number of proposals. We’re going to start looking at demonstrations when we get back on December 10th.

And I want to say that one of the greatest assets of this organization in addition to you all, our affiliated council, and that network that strengthens us at the state level, but the NCSS staff. We have a very, very capable team of people. And we’re fortunate because, many of you who were, in Washington, DC last year saw that Mildred McBee going off into the sunset, which gave us all a little bit of a panic. However, she’s much happier, retired in Georgia. And we have some new staff, Courtney deLeyer. And of course, many of you have had contact with Courtney and also Jodi, who has been a wonderful Meetings Assistant, and our new Meetings Director, David Bailor. So, with that very strong team of, I don’t want to say old, cause I’m really the only old staff member but, continuing staff member, members and these new people. Somebody is doing something with their hand. I wasn’t, am I supposed to pay attention? Okay. Like wrap it up, or, get the. Not sure. But anyway we’re doing very well.

This conference has been remarkable. And we’re so pleased to be here in California. We look forward to Houston. Heard some great stuff about that. And of course Atlanta. We’re real excited about that too. So, I’d be happy to entertain any questions that you might have about the report.

I’d like to dance with you too.

Jeff Passe, NC: You’re a very good dancer. I’m Jeff Passe, Past President. My question is, Susan, how many years have you been Executive Director?

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:
Seven.

Jeff Passe, NC:
Seven years as Executive Director. I don’t think the people know that Susan had some health problems this year. And she’s, she’s back stronger than ever. And I just want to say, on behalf of everyone, how much we treasure you as Executive Director.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:
Your support means so much to me and I appreciate the good thoughts. And I know there were lots of prayers coming my way. And I think it helped, especially, my health is back. But the prayers did a particularly good job on my hair. I never had curls before now. Thanks very much.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you, Susan Griffin. And I echo that. She’s my model. She’s everything and I appreciate her so much.

At this time, excuse me, at this time I’d like to call on Patty Hutman to bring us our Credentials report for today.

Patty Hutman, TX, Credentials Committee, Chair:
Good morning. As chair of the Credentials Committee, I am pleased to report that one hundred and forty six are registered and certified to vote in the House of Delegates as of 8:13 today, Saturday, December 1, 2007. And I move the adoption of the credentials report.

Male speakers: So moved. Second.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
All those in favor of accepting the Credentials report please say aye. Opposed? Abstained? Credentials report is accepted.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
I’d also like, at this time, to call on Susan again to talk to us about the Each One Reach One. Thank you.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:
In addition to our councils helping us recruit members, and our direct mail campaign, we have an individual Each One Reach One campaign, started by guess who, Gayle Thieman. And it is the possibility of recruiting members, each time you recruit a member, your name goes into a hat. And we choose a name from that hat and that person gets two free airline tickets, round-trip airline tickets anywhere in the continental, I have to say that, United States. But it’s been extremely successful. And as you can see from the names up there, we’d really like to have that grow. It’s, it’s, it’s going pretty well but I’d like to see every. If every NCSS member recruited one person, obviously we’d be in wonderful shape. And we’d have a stronger organization and be better advocates for social studies. So I encourage all of you, not just for the tickets, but because we’re going to strengthen our organization, to recruit a member in the coming year. Thanks very much.

We haven’t done. We do. We pull the name in March. Stay tuned.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Today is an exciting day because we actually exercise our deliberative democracy. I’d like to again welcome our Associated Groups and our new Communities. And also remind everyone that according to our new Constitution, they are non-voting delegates today for observation only. And that the rest of us need to be sure that you have a voting machine, electronic one. At this time, be sure that your cell phones are off or silenced.

We have three elections today. And at this time, I’d like to introduce a gentleman who is just amazing, does all kinds of wonder working things with the computer. Dustin Frank is the Educational Consultant of E-Instruction. He has provided us today with clickers for voting. And at this time, I’d like to introduce Dustin, who will teach us exactly how to do the wonderful magic that he’s brought for us. Dustin.

Dustin Frank, Educational Consultant, E-Instruction:
Well I hope I don’t let you down after that introduction there but. Thank you to everybody for letting us come in. It was much easier to get here. For those of you that know last year, I got in a couple days early this year. Last year I made it by about two and a half hours due to snow. So much easier to get through this year.

But in front of you, you should have a remote. And we have a couple of different types of remotes. I’m going to kind of talk about those real quickly. There is a radio frequency remote, which is the one you have in your hand. The bottom one is an infrared remote. These remotes are from a company called E-Instruction, which is located out in Denton, Texas. And we have the two different types. Are there some Texas folks? There we go. We have two different types basically because there are different types of settings. We have small classrooms, which is the smaller, the infrared, which works similar to your television remote. You have to point it directly towards the small receiver or towards your television for it to work. In here that might not be such a great idea because some of you are way in the back of the room and that little circle is about three inches across, three inches in diameter.

So we’re going to use what’s called the radio frequency. Radio frequency is similar to a wireless Internet or something like that, in that, the sense that it’s programmed to one of seventy five channels. So hopefully we have all of the remotes. We checked them last night to make sure that they are all frequented the same. And you can communicate. You don’t have to point. You don’t have to do anything. If you want to be tricky and put it underneath your arm or behind your back, you can do all that. They’ll still work. So.

I’m just, to get you going here so you can get familiar with them. If you’ll take your remotes. The bottom of it, there is a power key. It will actually turn on if you press any of the keys. But if you’ll turn it on, you should then see up in the LCD panel a little information. The main thing you’re looking for is up there in the top left hand corner. Right up there, you should see your remote number. That’s who you are.

So I’m going to ask you a couple of questions just for practice so you can become familiar with them. And the way you’re going to respond to me is by using those answer keys there in the middle. Now I have this set up that all you have to do is press the button and watch, magically, your box light up. So I’m going to come over here and pose you a question real quick, just to get you started here. I need to know. I know we’ve got people from all over the different country here, different places. So I need to know from you is exactly which region are you from? Are you from A, B? These are time zones. C, D? But I’m going to put an E out here for anywhere else. If you’re from anywhere. If you want to do the A for, you know, if you’re out there in Hawaii for the A side, that’s fine.

But, you’ll notice across the bottom, there are boxes. See the little number over there on the right? That’s telling me how many people are voting. These receivers can communicate about a thousand responses every .01 or one hundredth of a second. So if your box is not lighting up, then you need to let us know cause we have. There’s a couple right there. Okay. You’re looking up here. If your box is not light up, then you have not voted yet. Okay? And I don’t think anybody has one higher than 170 so I put my roster at 170. All right. Everybody’s remote working okay? There are some that are missing throughout the. You notice that some of them aren’t light up.

As an instructor in the classroom, just so you can kind of see why I use these in my class. I’m a former high school teacher myself. I actually got some feedback that I could look at. I could look at it and I could actually tell how my groups did. I could look at some bar graph information. I could see exactly where we’re from across there. So, you could imagine again that teaching classroom in the formative environment, if this is my data, then I’m not doing a very good job cause I’ve got people all across the board, so. We’re looking at this from a formative standpoint.

And we’re going to use it today to kind of collect some data as far as using the clickers. Question? One thing I do need to make sure you’re aware of is there’s a color coding system. And I think everybody in here is old enough to drive. So if you know what this little thing means. Last year I lived in a town of eight hundred and we didn’t have these, but. Now I have the opportunity to live in Omaha so we have a few more of those. Any Nebraska folks here? There we go Omaha.

The stop light is how you’re going to communicate back to the computer, meaning that you can answer multiple times. And all that simply means is these three colors communicate back to you what my computer knows about your response. So when you answered just a minute ago it turned dark blue. Dark blue is a hot color that says I hear you. So if your box is not blue, then we didn’t get your answer.

If you decide to change your mind for some reason, then these three colors communicate to you what my computer knows. Green means go ahead, you have told me that answer the same thing more than once. So it’s like A, A, A, A, A, A, A. And it’s going to flash green, green, green, green, green. So that’s a good thing. That’s a student confirming their answer.

Yellow means caution. Slow down. You picked A and now you’ve picked B. Or first you said yes, now you’re saying no. It’s okay. It’s just my computer communicating back to you.

And then red means stop. It’s yes or no and you picked F. So, so, if you see some red X’s, my computer is saying, I don’t understand what you’re trying to tell me. All right.

So just to practice that so you’re all familiar with it, we’ll jump over here and we’ll do a social studies question real quick. What this says is: The powers completing the table regarding checks and balances among the three branches of the federal government. So what I need to know is right here in this little box, which one of these four things would fill in that box right there? Which of those would be a check on the legislative branch? This will be our kind of last practice one but just so you could kind of see how they work. This is a chance for you to practice the red, yellow, green if you want to and see how it works.

Okay. I’m going to go ahead and end it. You guys are eighty two percent accurate. Very good. The nice part about this is that in a classroom that may be acceptable. And here I don’t know if is, but. One of the things about this software is we have algorithms. So if I was not pleased with your performance, I could discuss it, go back to my notes and overhead and discuss it further. And then I could actually pose another question for you. I could change that question behind the scenes. So flexibility in that I could use it multiple times, but.

Let me take you over here and kind of end with that just to kind of give you an idea of some things. Just real quickly, something about our software in general, I just need a real quick yes or no. Are you familiar with a product called ExamView? Just real quick, just give me an A as yes, B as no. We will be doing voting similar to this. You’ll see a PowerPoint slide here in a few minutes. It’ll have the people’s names, or have the resolution listed. Your boxes will be on the bottom and you’ll vote in this same fashion right here. Okay?

The reason I asked about ExamView, just to see if you’re familiar with it. Looks like we’re about a little under fifty percent there, about thirty five percent. The reason I mentioned that is if, if you’re in a school that you have clickers. We have about three million clickers nationwide and they’re growing ever more popular every day. The ExamView piece is kind of a powerful piece, especially in the social studies realm because this past January our company purchased a company called F.S. Creations. What that means is all the major textbook companies publish their content in ExamView. So Scott Foresman, Pearson, McGraw Hill, McDougal Littell, Harper, all of those. So if you have one of those textbooks, everything you have in your repertoire of teaching tools goes into our software and you could actually deliver it in this type of a fashion in class. So, I’m going to end this real quick.

Here are some things that are also possible. We are going to focus on the middle one, surveys and polls. You will notice on your remote, if anybody is still having problems with their remote and when we start, if you do not see the letters TMA on your remote, then you need to let us know when we start. Now it may do some things in between there cause I’ll be sitting over there turning them on and off and things like that. But TMA means a teacher managed assessment. So as we’re voting, I’ll be the teacher sitting over here behind the scenes and if your remote does not say TMA then your remote is on a different channel or it’s thinking something differently. So just let us know, okay?

There is my contact information. If you’re interested, we would love to visit with you. After we’re done here, we have a booth down there. The committee has been very gracious in letting us have a booth down in the Exhibit Hall, but we would love to talk to you more if you have any questions about the voting at all. So, thank you very much.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you Dustin. I think now we’ve thoroughly been educated in a wonderful electronic device. And hopefully as we begin our voting process you will find if very expedient. This is the first year that we’ve voted on House of Delegate committees with an electronic clicker. And that’s exciting for me.

I’d like to make one point of clarification from the HOD Manual before we begin. According to Article X, Section VIII, if a position for a HOD committee is contested then we have a secret ballot. It is conducted in the House of Delegates. If there is no contested position then the slate shall be elected by acclimation. If a motion to elect the slate by acclimation is moved, seconded and approved by a voice vote of the delegates in attendance. We do have one situation for Steering Committee and once those delegates have been introduced, then I will ask for a motion that they be elected by acclimation. We only have two candidates and we are electing two positions. Question?

Then at this time, I would like to introduce the candidates for the House of Delegates committees. Would you please come to the microphones at this time? Steering. If you are a candidate, would you please speak at the microphone by giving your name, your committee, and by, then by using clickers for the elections. This is the time when, when they are finished introducing themselves, we will accept them for acclimation.

Christine Allen, OR:
Christine Allen from Oregon.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Ted. Go ahead.

Ted Benton, FL:
Ted Banton from Florida.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you. Could I have a motion for acceptance of these two candidates for Steering Committee by acclimation?

Male speaker: Moved.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Second? Voice vote, yea? Thank you. Congratulations to Christine Allen.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
I very much appreciate everyone who said yea. Were there any nays? Were there any abstentions? They have been elected by acclimation. Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
It’s wonderful when you have somebody with one hundred percent parliamentary order sitting here on the stage. Our wonderful parliamentarian and especially the experienced Gayle Thieman. So thank you Gayle for that point of order.

Next, I would like to introduce those persons for Resolutions. If you would come to the microphone please.

Robert Dytell, NY:
Robert Dytell, ATSS/UFT, New York.

Jeanette Stepansky, TN:
Jeanette Stepansky, Tennessee.

Stephanie Hartman, NV:
Good Morning. Stephanie Hartman, Nevada.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
At this time, you need to use your clicker. Dustin on the screen. We’re A, B, and C. Is that correct? Thank you. And you get to vote for two candidates. We’ll vote one at a time. Okay? First choice vote is now open. At this time, your second candidate of selection, the vote is now open. Thank you.

At this time, I’d like for those voting for, excuse me, those candidates for the Resolution Committee to please come to the microphone. Excuse me, thank you Bob Dytell. I always need you baby. For Assignments. Here we go. We are again selecting two members for next years Assignment Committee. This is a three year commitment. All of these committees are for three years.

Merrill Frankel, CA:
Merrill Frankel from California.

Mary Duffin, NY:
Good morning. Mary Duffin from New York.

Lois Wolfe, GA:
Good morning. Lois Wolff from Georgia.

Bill Harris, OH:
Good morning. Bill Harris from Ohio.

Ron Adams, NH:
Top of the morning. Ron Adams from New Hampshire.

Justice Lovelace, SC:
Good morning. Justice Lovelace, South Carolina.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you. The vote is now open for our first selected candidate for this committee. Voting begins. Two. All, all House of Delegates committees, we select two for each committee. We’ll vote one at a time, just as we did prior. And the first, you will vote for one candidate and then for a second candidate. But we need to do it in two separate orders of business just as we did for Resolutions. Is that clear? Are there questions before we begin? Are we ready Dustin? Voting is now open for the other candidate who will be on Assignments. Voting is now beginning. We will announce the winners in just a moment. While we’re doing this technology transfer from one computer to the other. And the winners will be on the screen in just a moment and I will read them.

One of the exciting things about the House of Delegates.

Female speaker: Point of order? Peggy, I’m sorry. I think we have a problem with this voting procedure. It occurred to me when on the first, because if you don’t announce the results of the first election you can actually vote for the same person twice. So I think we should have, and I don’t know what to do about it. But I think we should have voted for one person. The results should have been announced. That person should have been eliminated and then we would vote for the remaining two. So I just. That’s why it’s a question.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
This is just, it’s exactly the same type of voting we’ve done in the House with a paper ballot. You select two names and. If we want to do it that way, I see no problem. What I hear you saying, let me see if I understand this, is will the computer allow you to vote twice for the same person? Dustin? So at this time, we’ll start over. How’s that. Are we happy? Peggy?

Peggy Altoff, CO:
Do we need a motion to do that? Cause I will motion it.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Okay. We have had a motion on the floor, and a second, that we redo the clicker voting for the committees. May I add a friendly amendment to that? We do not have to go back to Steering since we did a motion to accept them by acclimation. But on the Resolutions Committee and the Assignments Committee, the motion on the floor is that we redo those elections understanding now that one could vote. Here we go. Thank you very much. Good afternoon, good morning.

Male speaker: Good morning Peggy.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Question.

Male speaker: Question is, if, can you look at the screen and see if there is a need. In other words, if somebody would have been eliminated by percentage wise. Is there a need that you do a second vote? You see it? Look at the election results as they stand now and see if there is a need to [inaudible]?

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Yes Sally.

Sally:
My question is, are, from the two votes then, are the votes from the first round added to the votes from the second round?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We’re starting over.

Sally:
No, no, no. But will it be that way?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We’re starting over.

Sally:
My question is. No, no. Okay. Because you still vote twice, right?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Correct.

Sally:
So, let’s say the first time, let’s say that the first person gets, I don’t know, ten votes and the second person gets thirty votes. But then the second time around the first person gets fifty votes, and the next person gets sixty votes, whatever. I’m just saying that do you add the two numbers for the total, total?

Multiple Speakers:
No.

Sally:
Okay.

Female speaker: I’d also.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
We have a motion on the floor that we redo the election. As we were talking earlier, on a paper ballot you cannot vote for one person twice. So we are moving to a. You need to think through. This motion is on the floor and all I want now. We’ve called the question, and I would like a voice vote if we redo this. All in favor, please say aye. All opposed, nay. The motion has carried.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Any abstentions?

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Motion has carried.

Bob Nimtz, IL:
I would also. Bob Nimtz. I would also like to address something.

Male speaker: Request that speakers identify themselves by name and state.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you.

Bob Nimtz, IL:
Bob Nimtz, Illinois. I noticed that at the Credentials Committee said there was a hundred and forty six registered votes and I see that there’s like a hundred and fifty five, a hundred and fifty six people voting. Should we address that or not?

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
No sir. The reason is that at the time when she came to the podium to give that, we still had not called for the election and the doors had not been closed. Persons could not come in after 8:15. And those additional delegates were added. Thank you for that question. Jeff.

Jeff Passe, NC:
Jeff Passe, from North Carolina. I just want to clarify in the case of the Resolutions Committee. We’ll elect one person, that winner will be announced, and then the second vote would be a run off between the other two?

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
We are changing. We are asking for changes in voting procedures that we’ve never done before. Jeff is asking, the question on the floor ladies and gentlemen, is that we get, that we have a run off between the other two once the first one has been selected. That has never occurred on paper ballots. I personally have been involved in counting those paper ballots. It’s certainly something that we can do. Are you putting it in the form of a motion?

Jeff Passe, NC:
Well, it won’t work otherwise.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We need to have order. We have one person speaking at the time. Either the person at the podium or Peggy Jackson. Please provide that courtesy. Jeff.

Jeff Passe, NC:
I don’t think it can work otherwise. We’d have to know who won in order not to vote for the same person twice. So if we don’t want to do it that way because we’ve never done it, then we should have to go back to paper ballots.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Wait a second, there is one person speaking, and it’s the person at the microphone. Or it’s the person at the microphone up here. Peggy wishes to respond.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Point of order. We have just made a movement here when checking. We need to remove the name of one person who is a member of an Associated Group. Is that correct Susan? And is not an official delegate that can run for this position. I apologize that we did not check this before. But that’s what democracy is all about, is we walk through it. Sometimes we find things that are an error. So in this year, we have, we have set this program. This policy will definitely be reviewed, ladies and gentlemen. We will review this and, and the Manual can be changed accordingly for next year.

The motion is still on the floor. Jeff’s motion has passed. And not there are three more speakers. I think I believe you were next and then. Would you identify yourself by name.

Cheryl Rehome-Dean, CA:
Cheryl Rehome-Deanfrom California. I’m new to this, but all I know is that if I had a paper ballot and there are five names. I get to make two checks at the same time.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
That is correct. That’s what I said a while ago.

Cheryl Rehome-Dean, CA:
And if I have to do it this way, I may not get to vote for the other person. I’m only going to get to vote once and then I have to wait for the results. I may not get to have my second choice because that person could get eliminated or not be part of it for my second vote, even though I wanted to vote for them initially.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
I hear you exactly and I thank you for what you said.

Cheryl Rehome-Dean, CA:
Does that make sense?

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
That makes sense.

Cheryl Rehome-Dean, CA:
Okay. So.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Sue.

Sue Blanchette, TX:
I’m Sue Blanchette from Texas and I basically was going to say the same thing, that we could, on the paper ballot, we would be, it would be accumulation, and this is not allowing an accumulation of votes, and so we need to think, rethink this I believe.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Yes ma’am.

Trish Radigan, VA:
Trish Radigan, Virginia. I.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Hi Trish.

Trish Radigan, VA:
Hi. I actually just taught a unit on this. And the system that we just used is called cumulative voting. It’s used by both Ireland and Australia. And some boards of directors in the United States. It’s perfectly legitimate and it actually measures the intensity of a voters’ feelings about a particular candidate. You can spend your two votes however you want.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you for your comments. I appreciate it Trish. Steve Goldberg from New York.

Steve Goldberg, NY:
Hi. Steve Goldberg from New York. So clarification, this system does not allow you to vote for two at the same time. Is that correct? All right. Is there any way down the road that that could happen?

Male speaker: Yes but that was not what we were.

Steve Goldberg, NY:
[inaudible] So in the future for next year, we could go back to our traditional voting where there’s a list of five, everyone could punch two and it would tabulate. I think it’s really important to know because then this is just a stop gap right now, but hopefully next year we can technologically correct that. Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
I will remind you that we have had a motion on the floor that was passed. So there’s no further discussion. Okay? Let’s, we’ll move, now I need a motion to accept the two candidates on the screen by acclimation under Article X of the House of Delegates Manual that they be accepted by acclimation since it is not a contested election. Thank you Steve. May I have a second? All in favor, yea. All opposed, nay. Are there any abstentions? Then Resolutions has elected their two candidates.

Now we will move to Assignments. The election now for Assignments. The first, at this point in time. Dustin tell me again how you have it set up.

Dustin Frank, Educational Consultant, E-Instruction:
We can do it vote twice and add them or we can do it vote once, eliminate and vote again. It’s up to you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Vote for your first candidate please. You want to know what we’re doing? That would be a good question. We have a choice. Do we need, do you want to have another vote? We can vote for one candidate and let that be shown. This is a complete change of anything we’ve ever done in elections. But it’s up to you. You’re the body.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
If we vote twice and add them, you are going to probably be more satisfied with the results. That is the decision the chair has made. Vote twice and add them. Dustin says we can do it that way.

Male speaker: So moved.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
May I have a motion to that effect? The Chair has just ruled.

Male speaker: So moved.

Female speaker: Second.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
All in favor? All opposed? Abstentions? You may begin the voting process. You may now vote one more time.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
I just want to assure you that we are doing the vote as you requested. The votes for the first election are being added to the votes for the second. And we’ll give you the results, but not the numbers shortly.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
It’s exciting to see us work through and process exactly like the House and the Senate. Give yourself a hand. The first time we do something, we always learn. I learn the most of all when I make one mistake, then another. And the older I get and the more I work with our organization, the more I learn that I need to learn more. So we’ve accomplished that this morning. It will take just a second for those votes to be transferred from one computer to the other. And then I will announce the HOD Committee members that have been elected for 2007.

Let me go ahead and say at this time, that at the end of this session, you need to meet with your committee somewhere here at the front and huddle and talk for just a second about your plans for communication, exchanging e-mails, and hopefully setting up some electronic talking. Okay. I was reminded that we have to let this room go at 10:30, no matter what we’ve got to skedaddle out of here so those meetings need to occur outside the door. Questions about that? Are we ready Tina. Excuse me? Okay.

I’d like to announce the winners of the committees for the 2008 and 9 and 10 House of Delegates. Christine Allen of Oregon and Ted Banton of Florida will now be on the Steering Committee. Congratulations. Bob Dytell and Jeanette Stepanske of Tennessee. Bob Dytell from New York, will now be on Resolutions for 2008, 9 and 10. Congratulations Bob and Jeanette. And Justin Lovelace of South Carolina and Lois Wolfe from Georgia are on the Assignment Committee for the next three years. Georgia. Lois and Justin, congratulations. Thank you.

We’re about five minutes behind and we have eighteen resolutions to go to in a minute. But we first have an amendment vote. I just want to thank you for the way you responded and the way we worked through together as a body and that makes me excited as a government teacher to see that we have worked through the process of democracy. I’d now like to turn it back to Gayle, who is going to discuss our amendment and the voting on it.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
This, as I explained yesterday, this change in the Constitutional amendment is required so that in the future NCSS voting for Board members and officers can be by some means other than mail ballot. It would allow us, but not require us, it would allow us to do that voting electronically. I want to remind you this House of, this House of Delegates already voted and approved a Constitutional amendment to this affect last year. However, we found additional areas in the Constitution referencing a mail ballot. And we need to remove those.

So this proposed amendment is to allow for membership votes on amending the Constitution to be conducted by other means than the mail ballot. And the proposed changes: Article II to strike the words “subject to the provision for mail ballot.” In Article IV to strike the words “through a mail ballot.” And that is twice in Article IV. I’d like to hear a motion to approve this amendment. Moved. Do I hear a second? I’ve heard, motion was moved and seconded. Any further discussion? Seeing none, I will call for the vote. All those in favor of this amendment, please say aye. Opposed? Abstained? Motion carries. Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
I need to remind you at this time, listen carefully please, if you leave for any reason from this time forward, your clicker cannot remain at the table for someone else to use to vote for you. We are about to enter a key piece of our democracy, of selecting and voting on resolutions. You must leave your clicker with a Steering Committee member at the door [tape ends]

Okay.

The microphones are correct. They should be turned this way so they can see. Jeff is ready.

Jeff Passe, NC:
Madam chair.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Yes.

Jeff Passe, NC:
I move that the reading aloud of the resolutions be waived.

Female speaker: Second.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
There is a motion on the floor that the reading of the resolutions be waived. I assume Jeff, you are speaking of only the title and the BE IT RESOLVED will be read?

Jeff Passe, NC:
No, I just think the title is all that we need to have read.

Female speaker: Second.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
There is a second. Any further discussion? The, we are reading only the title in the sake of time. We have about eighty seven minutes for eighteen resolutions. The question has been called. All those in favor say aye. All those opposed? Are there any abstentions? The motion is carried. Thank you.

Now I’ll introduce again, Greg and Michael.

Greg Timmons, OR, Co-Chair, Resolutions Committee:
The way it’s going to work today is we have eighty seven minutes. We have eighteen complex resolutions. We’re just going to give you title. The way it’s going to work is that Gayle is going to run things. If you want to speak for the resolution, you’re going to line up on one side of the microphone. And if you want to speak against it, you’re going to line up on the other side by the microphone. And then we’re going to go back and forth between pro and con. Bob is going to keep time for us again. We’re going to start with Resolution number one.

The title of Resolution 07-01-1 is No Child Left Behind Action Plan for NCSS Advocacy. Pro, con, let the discussion begin. We will vote with a clicker in approximately, well when the discussion is over.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
John.

John Moore, KY:
John Moore from Kentucky. I just have a question of point of clarification. You didn’t mention the amount of time that we would.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We have one minute for each speaker and three minutes for each resolution, unless we move through some others quickly so that we have more substantive time.

Male speaker: [inaudible]

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Is someone wishing to approach?

Joe McDonald, MD:
Good morning. Joe McDonald, past president Middle States Council for Social Studies and also from the great state of Maryland. My comment’s about this resolution and several of the other resolutions that are before us today focus on what seems to be an irresistible urge by this organization to endorse resolutions that call for more federal oversight in education, particularly in social studies just in order to get social studies taught in the classroom. My concern about having us on the, regards No Child Left Behind, we’re calling for more assessments, national curriculum. And I think that if we move in that direction, that we are going against all of the things that we’ve, wonderful things that we’ve seen in this conference and previous conferences that better instruction for social studies. Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President: I want to remind you that if you are for this resolution, you must be at that podium. And if you are against this resolution, [inaudible]

[tape continues] Male speaker: to a broader view of educational legislation in this country and not tie ourselves to this particular legislation, because the new administration will develop it’s own education policy. Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Peggy.

Peggy Altoff, CO:
Please look at the be resolved. We’re not asking for changes. Particularly we’re not asking for national standards because if we go for national. If the move for national standards goes, it’s only going to be in reading and math. It’s not going to be in social studies anyway. No one in this nation has called for national standards for social studies. So, please look at the be resolved. All we’re asking for is consideration and the development of a plan. That’s it. Thanks.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Is anyone else approaching? All those in favor of Resolution 07-01-1: NCLB Action Plan for NCSS Advocacy, please vote. We’re voting electronically. A is yes, B is no. This resolution was passed.

Greg Timmons, OR, Co-Chair, Resolutions Committee:
The next resolution is Resolution 07-01-2: Support for NAEP Assessments in Core Social Studies Disciplines.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Remind you, if you are for this resolution, you are over on this side. Against, at the other microphone. Peggy.

Peggy Altoff, CO:
First thing I want to say is this is not about increased testing. This is about existing testing in NAEP. As the Congress has, there are tall spending bills in Congress. Only one of them has passed. You know what’s going on in terms of threats of veto, etc. With existing funding, they have cut fourth grade in civics, in U.S. History. They have cut plans for World History and Econ. And they have postponed geography testing from 2012 to 2014. What this amendment asks, what this resolution asks for is for all of us. You know it would be great if eight at one time would attack their senate or representative you know, all on the same day, from the same state. And all it asks for is to have the funding to keep existing assessment. You want us pushed off the table further? Hey vote against it.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Does anyone wish to approach the microphone? Seeing no one, we are ready to vote for Resolution 07-01-02: Support for NAEP Assessments in Core Social Studies Disciplines. This resolution is passed.

Male speaker: Please turn in your packet to the next Resolution 07-01-3: NCSS Early Childhood Education Position Statement Update Committee. For the resolution, to my left. Against, to my right. Please approach the microphone.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Seeing no one approaching the microphone, we are ready to vote on Resolution 07-01-3. Resolution 01, 07-01-3 has passed.

Male speaker: Moving on to resolution, the next resolution 07-01-4: Fostering Effective Communication Among Social Studies Communities. Again, those who want to speak for on this side. Those that want to speak against on that side.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Seeing no one approaching the microphone, we’re ready to vote. This motion passed. That’s 07-01-4.

Male speaker: The next resolution 07-01-5: Joint Membership Recruitment. Two parts to the BE IT RESOLVED NCSS and State Councils. If you are in favor, please come to the microphone here. Against, over here.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Seeing no one approaching the microphone, we’re ready to vote. 07-01-5 has passed.

Male speaker: Next resolution, 07-01-6: Support for the Development of the Revolving Membership System and Process. Those who would like to speak for the motion over here. Those who would like to speak against over here.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Ray Wicks.

Ray Wicks, MO:
Ray Wicks, Missouri. I would just like somebody to explain what that means. My understanding is that NCSS already has a revolving process. We renew at different times of the year. Our state council does the same thing. My understanding is many state councils do the same thing. So I’m not quite sure what this is calling us to, to do.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
I’m going to ask the Executive Director to explain a little bit about the implications of this membership. Oh. Terry.

Terry Trimble, FL:
A number of the state councils indicated at Summer Leadership Workshop that because of manpower and computer power, they were restricted on an annualized registration. If they joined in a certain point, they had to go to a fixed date as opposed to rolling forward and being able to renew one year from the date of the initial. So they were asking for additional support along the way that Jeff Passe had been trying to aid councils in developing new systems to give them more flexibility and providing more options to the councils in handling their membership database.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Are you asking in this resolution that NCSS handle the collection of state dues? I didn’t hear anybody approach the microphone but I heard some no’s that the intent of this resolution is not to have NCSS collecting state dues.

Terry Trimble, FL:
Terry Trimble, Florida Council. The intent was only that assistance. Not that NCSS handle it, but that technical assistance be provided so that the states that were having trouble in handling the way they did the rotation of their membership roster would be able to do that.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Thank you for that clarification. Seeing no one else approach the microphone, we are ready to vote. Motion has passed. That was 07-01-6.

Male speaker: Please turn to Resolution number 7: Support for Increased Pre-Service Teacher Recruitment. Same procedures.

David Rutherford, MS:
David Rutherford, Mississippi Council. Point of clarification. The title does not seem to match the resolution. The title says we’re supporting pre-service teacher recruitment. But the resolution is to increase membership of people from underrepresented groups. My question is: Do we want to increase recruitment of all pre-service teachers or just people from, pre-service teachers from underrepresented groups?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Would a member of the underrepresented, of the Ad Hoc Committee of Underrepresented Groups be able to help us with that? Please approach the microphone.

John Moore, KY:
This is John Moore from Kentucky and I serve as the Chair of the NCSS Taskforce for Underrepresented Groups. Our taskforce identified pre-service teachers as a component of underrepresented groups with the understanding that we have very limited membership among pre service teachers in this organization. And many professional organizations in education have student associate groups on their individual campuses that are affiliated with the national groups. Say for example, the national middle school association have individual local chapters that institutions known as the student middle school association on that campus. So pre-service teachers are viewed as a component of underrepresented in NCSS.

Trish Radigan, VA:
I served at Summer Leadership Institute on the subcommittee that wrote this resolution. And I believe we actually produced two or three regarding underrepresented groups and pre-service teachers. And I believe they were combined as part of the consolidation to speed up our process. And that, perhaps, accounts for the slight mismatch between title and content. I believe it’s just an editing issue.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
With that clarification of the intent of the resolution. Go ahead.

David Rutherford, MS:
David Rutherford again from Mississippi. I have to advocate against passing this because of the confusing language. We have one WHEARAS that specifically identifies ethnic minority graduates from teaching professional programs. We don’t have anything that says that pre-service teachers in general are underrepresented in NCSS. I would recommend that this be rewritten and clarified, and that we do not pass it today.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Jeff Passe.

Jeff Passe, NC:
Jeff Passe from North Carolina. I’d like to remind the House that what we’re really voting on, on the BE IT RESOLVED and that it’s really not necessary to play with the WHEREASs because we could be here all afternoon if we wanted to do that. You’re only voting on the BE IT RESOLVED. And that’s what the Board of Directors will be looking at should this pass.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Does anybody want to make an amendment to clarify? Are you approaching?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:
Yes. Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT, New York City. I was on the, at the Leadership Institute, the Summer Leadership Institute and I was on the committee that looked at this. There was a problem and we did about three or four resolutions and they were combined. I think we might solve the whole situation by changing the title: Support for Increased Pre-service Teachers From Historically Underrepresented Groups.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
I don’t believe that we can change a title. We can change a resolution.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:
We can’t change a title? But, then it would match the RESOLVE and solve the problem of what we were trying to do [inaudible].

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
The question has been called for this motion as indicated.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:
Does anybody have a suggestion to change the RESOLVED?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Carolyn.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:
Maybe we can’t do it, I don’t know. But the intent was that underrepresented groups was part of, I need to look for pre-service people in underrepresented groups.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Thank you. The question has been called and to close debate. First we are going to just do a voice vote to close debate, call the question, and then we’ll vote electronically. All those in favor of closing debate say aye. Those opposed? Abstained? The motion to close debate has carried. We will now vote on this resolution as printed. This resolution passed sixty percent to forty percent. Thank you for your participation.

Male speaker:
If you’ll turn your packets to the next Resolution 07-01-8: Trial Membership Program.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Ray.

Ray Wicks, MO:
Ray Wicks, Missouri. I rise with a point of information. This is for Susan. Is a three month trial period practical from the perspective of processing membership and distribution of publications?

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:
I believe we would have to analyze whether or not it is practical. Many years ago, we did a trial membership and the amount of billing involved, and then the amount of return for people who actually paid that bill was very, very low. That said, it may be time to try it again. So I think it would be helpful if the language said that we would investigate the possibility. Okay, great. And so and, and based on what we find, have a trial membership maybe to look at it for one year.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Go ahead at the podium.

Ron Adams, NH:
Ron Adams, New Hampshire. I had some of the same questions, but also I was concerned about the second part of the resolution in terms of that you would take the targeted population who are identified by affiliated organizations or nominated by NCSS members. So that you would have to be, I’m not quite sure what that means. Would NCSS members be in fact nominating people for a trial membership? Would affiliated organizations be nominating specific people?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
So we have had a question. Perhaps someone will approach on the other side to answer that question. But go ahead, you’re at the microphone right now. Go ahead.

Janna Bremer, MA:
Janna Bremer. I’m the Executive Secretary of the Massachusetts Council, so this would obviously, that second part, have an impact on my job if I’m to be nominating these people. But overall, I think the whole thing is very impractical and I don’t think three months is sufficient time for anyone to determine if this is the right organization for them.

Male speaker: To answer the question in reference to the affiliates that was intended, the state affiliates be allowed to nominate along the lines of the first timers and the scholarships that were given this year or an NCSS member. Either one could recommend somebody for a trial membership.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Is there anyone who wishes to speak for this resolution? We’ve used our three minutes. All right, please vote on the resolution 07-01-8 as presented. This resolution failed. 07-01-8 failed.

Male speaker: Resolution 01-9: On Demand Professional Development. On Demand Professional Development.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Seeing no one approaching the microphone, we are ready to vote. This resolution passed.

Male speaker: Please turn your packets to the next Resolution 07-01-10: Federal Support for Social Studies Professional Development.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Go ahead.

Joe McDonald, MD:
Joe McDonald, Middle States. Again, my opposition to anything regarding having the federal government provide more oversight into education, which is by Constitution a state right. The federal government has not even fully funded No Child Left Behind, let alone any other education mandate for the last forty years. Why in the world do we think that the federal government now will even fund staff development? It’s a state responsibility. The state should take full control over what staff development is and how it should be implemented. And let’s leave the federal government out of it. Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
At the microphone.

Peggy Jackson, NM:
Peggy Jackson, New Mexico. Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act since 1965 has created professional development money. Professional development money is a part of what we’re, what we’re asking for here is that adequate participation be strengthened in the knowledge and skills of teachers. Professional development money is an appropriation of Congress. And what we’re asking for is that it include diverse professional, all of us. In my home state, for example, I sat in my Congress person’s office and heard a principal say, I would give social studies teachers no professional development money because it does not come back to our state. I recommend acceptance of this resolution.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Seeing no one else approaching the microphone, we’re ready to vote. This motion 07-01-10 was approved.

Male speaker: Please turn to 07-01-11. The title is Regional Conferences.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Yes please.

Female speaker: Could somebody just explain this?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
I’d like one of the proponents, proposers of this resolution to approach the microphone.

Male speaker: Very few people will spend money.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Terry, identify yourself.

Terry Trimble, FL:
Excuse me. Terry Trimble, Florida Council for the Social Studies. Few people without the experience of what a conference will do for them are going to come from Florida to San Diego. However, the experience that we feel is an escalating experience. You attend your state council and have a positive experience. Then maybe a regional conference and then a national conference. We believe that the regionals that exist are very successful. We believe that regional conferences can be very successful in other areas and encourage bringing those closer to people, making sure that they are available in all parts of the country, particularly when the national is so far away from a particular area.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Go ahead.

Dave Kimber, MI:
Dave Kimber from Michigan. I don’t understand when other alternatives do not exist, are the big cities going to vanish? I don’t understand that part of it.

Janna Bremer, MA:
As, as. Janna Bremer.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Your name please.

Janna Bremer, MA:
Janna Bremer, Massachusetts. As one who has been heavily involved in the Northeast Regional Conference for countless years, far be it from me to be opposed to regional conferences. I think they are wonderful. Why should NCSS have to take the leap? This is something that is regional. And it should be run by the regions. If they can’t do it, if they can’t get themselves together enough to run one, then whose fault is that? I think NCSS can help give them a kick. But I don’t see that it’s their responsibility to make it happen.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Carolyn.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:
Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT, New York City and to [inaudible] so I’ll give you some historic perspective on this area. There was a Southeastern Council for the Social Studies, Conference for the Social Studies. And once they wanted to be a council, we have the meetings at NCSS [inaudible]. In other words it was what that region managed to put together and wanted to do. We have Middle States Council for the Social Studies, which predates NCSS and Middle States, which I am on the board of, also has regional conferences. And it was an initiative of Middle States states that wanted to do this. And NCSS [inaudible]. ATSS/UFT does a regional conference with the suburbs. We don’t want to be a Council, we put it together. The thing is that all of these, NCSS does give seed money. NCSS gives help. Even in New York City with all our clout, as some people think, NCSS got us a better contact with a local hotel for a local conference. NCSS will do this. We don’t need this resolution.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Time for discussion is over. We are ready to vote on Resolution 7-01-11. This resolution failed.

Male speaker: Please turn in your packets to the next Resolution 07-01-12: Regional Council Assistance Teams.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Seeing no one approach the mike, we’re ready to vote. This resolution passed.

Male speaker: Please turn to the next Resolution 07-01-13: Impact of National Council’s Conferences on States and Regions.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Seeing no one approaching the microphone, we’re ready to vote. This resolution passed.

Male speaker: Next resolution. Resolution 07-1-14: NCSS to Encourage and Support the Establishment of Legislative Liaisons at the Affiliate Levels by Providing Training at National Conference.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Seeing no one approaching the microphone, we’re ready to vote. This resolution also passed.

Male speaker: The next Resolution is 07-01-15: Increasing Awards Nominations.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Go ahead.

Sandy Senior Dauer, CT:
Sandy Senior Dauer, Connecticut and Chairman of the Awards Committee. I wrote this hastily in Summer Leadership Conference. I presented it to the Awards Committee meeting yesterday. And we tweaked the wording a bit with only one minor really change in what it says. I would like to read that right now if I could.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Are you asking for an amendment?

Sandy Senior Dauer, CT:
I’d like to make a friendly amendment I guess to this, in changing the wording.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We also need to have the copy.

Sandy Senior Dauer, CT:
She has, she has a copy. I gave it to her. I gave it to Sheena at the beginning today so she has the changes.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Thank you.

Sandy Senior Dauer, CT:
Shall I just read them?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Yes.

Sandy Senior Dauer, CT:
Okay. BE IT RESOLVED, where it says the first one, by creating a liaison. Mark out creating a liaison with each council. And the wording should be “suggesting that Councils.” “Suggesting that Councils.” Reading on, represented in the House of Delegates have a designated person. Add that. And then it reads the rest of the way as it does. In the second BE IT RESOLVED mark out “submitting articles” replaced by “disseminating information.” Okay. The next to last. The only controversy about this is we were concerned about people copying or being too influenced if we put whole projects on, online. But instead of saying “putting the videos of some Awards of Excellence” we’re saying instead “putting edited examples of Award winners projects online for potential applicants and other teachers to view.” Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
The resolution. The amendment must be voted on first. Is there any discussion? So, the amendment has been presented. It has to be seconded. Is there further discussion on the amendment? We will have to vote on the amendment before we can vote on the resolution. You need to approach. Okay. The question has been called for the amendment. I just want to make sure everybody can see the amendment. We’re not going to have further discussion. By the first portion, the first resolution, the second resolution and the fifth resolution, there is minor editing. All those in favor of the amendment, please vote now electronically. A is yes, B is no.

The amendments to the resolution have passed. Now it is time to vote on the resolution itself. Seeing no one approaching the microphones, we are ready to vote on resolution as amended 07-01-15. This amended resolution passed.

Male speaker: Turn your packets to the next Resolution 07-01-16: Support for the Continuation and Development of Scholarships for First Time Attendees to the National Conference. All those who want to speak in favor of the resolution, over on this side. Those opposed on this side.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Go ahead.

Helen Delahante, NM:
Thank you. I’m Helen Delahante from New Mexico. I’d like to speak in support of this because we are a state and a region that has a great number of Native American teachers who are first generation educators and they need to be given the utmost encouragement amongst other minorities in our states, but primarily Native American. Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Go ahead.

Bob Nebbs Benton: Bob Nebbs Benton. I’d just like a clarification. Is this just for the registration or are we including everything in this that would have cost for an attendee to come here?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
I will tell you that the current first timers scholarship initiated this year was for conference registration. But this resolution does not specify those details. I will just tell you what it was this year. Approximately two hundred dollars.

Seeing no one else approaching the microphone, please vote on this resolution. This resolution passed.

Male speaker: Please turn to Resolution 07-01-17. This is the final in our category of business resolutions that affect the operations of NCSS. This resolution is titled: Resolution Supporting the Chicago 2016 Olympics.

Fred Isele, IL:
Fred Isele, Illinois Council for the Social Studies. If you, this is just to seriously consider the national annual meeting to be held in Chicago in 2015. I know we’re already maxed out at, I think 2014 as I, as I have heard. But even so, as a point of clarification, working with the Olympic committee in Chicago, it sounds like NCSS would be a great benefactor of all of the overall growth and developmental opportunities that are coming in for this particular event. So it’s just a question of serious consideration.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Your name please?

Jerome Hoynes, IL:
Jerome Hoynes, pardon me, Jerome Hoynes, Illinois. And as evidence [tape ends]

materials show that the Chicago Olympic bid is genuinely interested in our support. They have, they want to see what we’ll do with it. And social studies can set the way where PE teacher, foreign language, all these other associations can follow the NCSS. What they’ll like to do is, they’ll put our icons, our state and national icons on their website to show that educational organizations find genuine benefit for our students and communities.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
The microphone.

Suzie Fogerty, FL:
Suzie Fogerty, Florida. And while we love Chicago and we support them having the Olympics, I was the chair of the Steering Committee the year that we did Chicago. It was very difficult putting on a conference in Chicago because of the union business that we had to fight all the way around.

Male speaker: Things are getting better.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Your name? Approaching the microphone?

Greg Speilman, CA:
Greg Speilman from California, San Diego. I want to speak in favor. I would love to go to Chicago even though I am not a Cubs fan. Chicago would be, it would be a perfect time. The whole nation would be focused on, on Chicago. We can bring so many issues of the social studies. It goes right into our [inaudible]. There’s no way that we could ever, ever think that Chicago would not be a wonderful choice. It’s a beautiful city. And personally, I’m a union member and I’m proud of being a union member.

Todd Hendricks, MN:
Todd Hendricks, Minnesota. I hope that all of you will support this. And I hope that because it didn’t work in the past, doesn’t mean let’s not try again. As a new member to the House of Delegates, as well as a relatively new member to NCSS.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We are at three minutes for this resolution discussion. Christine?

Christine Allen, OR:
I move that we extend time by two minutes.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Second? All those. It’s been moved and seconded that we extend the discussion two minutes. All those in favor say aye. Those opposed? Abstain? The ayes have it. Additional two minutes.

Todd Hendricks, MN:
Thank you Christine. I fear that if that is what’s going on in the House of Delegates, in other words, it didn’t work before, let’s, we don’t want to try it again or tweak what didn’t work to try to make it work. That scares me and if that’s what this House of Delegates is all about, please let me know so that I can remove myself as a delegate. However, I would strongly encourage the support of Chicago, the support of the Summer Olympics and if we are truly crossing bridges and breaking barriers, the Olympics is the epitome of what that is all about. And that’s something that I think we need to move forward. Please support this.

Janna Bremer, MA:
Janna Bremer, Massachusetts. As a, I’ve been for a long time involved with the conference committee and I can assure you that all of those things will be considered by the Conference Committee, whether it is practical for any reasons to hold it in Chicago. This would give to the Conference Committee a feeling of how strongly the people feel about going to Chicago. And that would be helpful to know. So, I have no problem with this resolution.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We have one more person at the microphone. Then I’ll make a point of clarification.

Marian Rearick, TX:
Marian Rearick, Houston, TX. Being from St. Louis, I love Chicago. I’ve been there many times. But I’m concerned that in 2015 they’re going to be under construction for the Olympics. And I think that would add to a lot of difficulties for us to have a convention there.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Seeing no one else approaching the microphone, I would like to make a point of clarification that the previous conference in Chicago, despite any concerns about union costs was a financial success. I can also tell you that future conferences in, for NCSS must always be at a Convention Center. We no longer, we have exceeded the capacity of hotels. Thank you. We are ready for the vote on this resolution. This motion passed.

Male speaker: I ask you now turn to the next resolution. This resolution is in the category of social and political issues that can.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We just need to, we need to hear the name of the resolution and title.

Male speaker: Resolution 07-04-1. This resolution is in the category of social and political issues that concern teachers but do not have direct impact on the nature of social studies education. A Call for a Public Stand.

Male speaker: Motion to table.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
There has been a motion to table this resolution. Do I hear a second?

Male speaker:
Is there discussion allowed?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
It’s not debatable. And so are we ready for the clickers? If you want to table this motion, yes is 1 and no, nay is 2. We’re ready to vote.

Female speaker: Just want to remind folks that yes we do vote on a motion to table. It requires a simple majority.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Question?

Male speaker: Madam President. Procedural point, not speaking to the issue that I think is going to come up, might I recommend that this committee puts together a red card, a green card and another colored card so that when you come to the mike if you’re on that side of the room, if we grow the House of Delegates to what it’s capable of, if you’re on that side of the room and you want to speak for something, it may take you the full two minutes to get here. Might I recommend a red card to be against, a green card in support for future reference?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Okay.

Male speaker: Also, we should have an abstention as a voting option, a letter C Dustin if you could add that next year. I realize you don’t have to vote but if my clicker’s broken, I’m abstaining without abstaining.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Thank you. Point of clarification?

Male speaker: Point of order please. I would like to make a motion if it is in order to remove from the table the motion that we just put on the table.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
All right. And, this is now a motion to remove from the table this resolution and it’s a motion to reconsider. I’m going to, as Chair, I’m going to allow us to finish the business of other resolutions and that will just be a few moments before we reconsider. It’s simply a matter of courtesy, give people time to think.

Male speaker: At this point I’d like to introduce Peggy Jackson who will come up and read the courtesy resolutions.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
It’s exciting for me to see the process of democracy work. We are, we are moving and grooving. Can you sense the excitement. While we’re waiting to vote on our motion, whether or not we have a discussion or not, I’d like to stay, to say at this point that I, we have two courtesy resolutions that we would like to introduce and vote on at this time.

If you’ll look at 07-05-1: Recognition of NCSS President Gayle Thieman.

WHEREAS Gayle Thieman has worked tirelessly for years to advance social studies education in her home state of Washington and Oregon,

WHEREAS Gayle Thieman worked through writing, presenting and lecturing to engage social studies teachers at the university and college levels,

WHEREAS Gayle Thieman has modeled in her classes a true social studies educator,

WHEREAS Gayle Thieman has designed curriculum and standards for her states,

WHEREAS Gayle Thieman has used her leadership skills to enhance and grow the National Council for the Social Studies through her tenure as member, Vice President, President-Elect and President in 2007,

WHEREAS Gayle Thieman is a national advocate for social studies issues,

WHEREAS Gayle Thieman’s scholarship leadership and friendship to the social studies is widely known,

BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies formally recognizes and thanks Gayle Thieman for her service and value to all in the social studies community, and especially the NCSS membership.

All in favor of approving this resolution, please say aye. Any opposition, say nay. Any abstentions? This resolution has been approved by this body. 07-05-02.

In recognition of NCSS member, Conference Chair 2007 Diane Hart, the California Council for the Social Studies and the Local Arrangements Committee in San Diego and California.

WHEREAS Diane Hart has worked tirelessly for years as Conference Chair of the ’07 San Diego conference with a great vision,

WHEREAS Diane Hart has overcome challenges and obstacles to create crossing borders and building bridges,

WHEREAS Diane Hart, the San Diego teachers, the California Council for the Social Studies and the Local Arrangements Committee have worked with great tenacity and teamwork,

WHEREAS the San Diego teachers and the California Council for the Social Studies have endured personal pain, adversity and loss due to recent catastrophes,

BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies staff and membership honor and thank these members for their outstanding work and service to all of our national and international colleagues and friends.

At this time, I would just like to personally thank the California Council and also our Local Arrangements Committee. Diane Hart is not present. She’s busy doing something else. All those in favor of accepting this resolution by acclimation please say aye. The ayes have it. Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Are there any further motions for this body? Go ahead.

Male speaker: I would like to speak in favor. We’re returning now to the order of business that we jumped the sequence. So I would like to speak in favor of removing from the table the resolution 04-01 because we saw how close the margin was. I love this technology. I would like to, I think we owe it to ourselves to have some sustained ten, fifteen minute discussion on the question. And then I’m happy to get beat in a fair vote. But I’d like to have the discussion.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
So you’re moving?

Male speaker: I’m moving to remove from the table the motion that we voted by fifty two to forty eight to put on the table.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Is there a second? There is no further debate. And do you want us to do? Can we do the vote electronically or just aye? We’re going to do it electronically. And yes is A. No is B. C is abstain. And we are, the motion is to remove it from the table so we can debate it. It’s not for or con the resolution, it’s to remove from the table so we can debate. This is just a majority vote. So the, the motion to remove the table passed and we are ready for debate. Jeff Passe.

Jeff Passe, NC:
Jeff Passe from North Carolina. As a past president and as a senior member of, close to senior member of this organization, I want to provide a little bit of context. I’m glad that we’re going to discuss this. We could set forth a model of civic discussion. But I’d like to create a tone here and just give you a little historical background. There are some people who believe that organizations should be neutral or non-political. But others believe there is no such thing as being neutral or non-political. The very statement of neutrality is a political statement.

Now during the civil rights era NCSS did not take a stand against segregation. And many members of that organization, of this organization were upset with that. And some people, to this day are ashamed of that. Others see it as a necessary step to keep from losing members who might object to the position. Voting on this resolution for or against may not indicate your feelings about the Iraq war. Certainly, the wording is inflammatory. But somebody might object for other reasons and we should be respectful of each other’s reasons is all I want to say.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Ray.

Ray Wicks, MO:
Ray Wicks, Missouri. I move that we extend debate on this issue beyond three minutes to a maximum of fifteen minutes.

Female speaker: Second.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
It’s been moved and seconded that we extend time to a maximum of fifteen minutes. All those in favor say aye. Opposed? Okay, we’ll electronically vote for yes, no.

Male speaker: [Inaudible] for this?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
No. We’re extending for a maximum of fifteen minutes. That time begins now Bob. Ray.

Ray Wicks, MO:
If I may speak to the motion. I certainly support Jeff’s position. While the topic of the, the resolution is extremely important, it has been debated for months and years and will continue to be debated until the new administration comes forth. I think the important issue for us an organization is whether or not we should take public stands on issues like this. I don’t think it makes any difference how we feel individually, but we have to recognize that as individual citizens we can take whatever position we wish but while we are here we are acting in behalf of the organization members who may agree or who may disagree with us. And I think that’s the key to this resolution. What should be our stand in making public statements on issues like this? Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Going to the microphone.

Male speaker: [inaudible], Nevada Council. I think just like for many people in here I definitely support an end to the war in Iraq. Definitely support. Some of the language in here, such as AND WHEREAS during the war in Iraq in the so called war on terror. I think that’s extraordinarily inflammatory. I think it takes the organization from someone or a group of people who have a conscientious objection to what’s going on and it makes it something that is political and divisive. And I think considering the entire membership, I definitely support. I should say I definitely oppose this, this resolution.

Greg Steeland, CA Greg Steeland from California. Dr. Thieman said something yesterday, her first experience at the House of Delegates how a member reached out and extended time. I went out and bought a new suit last year in D.C. I was so excited to come to House of Delegates and [inaudible] excited. I left crushed. I left bruised. As also was talked about in one of the speeches yesterday, that this organization that I brought into refused, refused to even to discuss the issue. And I am so thankful that I got to hear that opinion of my fellow colleague. That we are able to talk in a society. That we are actually practicing and living the things that we teach our kids. I just had twelve kids present to this conference about the issues, what are the responsibilities of a citizen. And I came back, I rushed back here to do my civic duty here and to have it once again table and crushed. This organization stands for something. We believe in the things that we teach. So I’m very thankful for this opportunity. And I encourage us to take a stand and to not be afraid.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Microphone.

Male speaker: I just have two comments. First of all, this.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Your name please.

Joe McDonald, MD:
Oh, Joe McDonald, Middle States Council. This proposal was submitted by the Roose Forum and I consider myself to be politically astute, but I have no idea who, who these folks are. I too am opposed to the war in Iraq and would be much more comfortable if the proposal came from one of the affiliated organizations of National Council for Social Studies.

Number two, a statement that was made yesterday that struck me. The whole idea about social studies is that we teach our students how to think, not what to think. And I believe that this organization, this resolution goes against that. Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Microphone.

Mounir Farah, AR:
Mounir Farah from Arkansas. I, I spent the last two of the last five years in, in the Middle East, in Jordan and Syria. And I’ve seen the devastations that this war brought about. There are about a million and seven hundred thousand refugees in Syria. Three hundred and fifty thousand children with no school in Iraqi refugees in Syria. There are about seven hundred thousand refugees in Jordan. I have never seen, I’ve been traveling to the Middle East for forty years, I’ve never seen the bitterness against the United States that I’ve seen. I think any move to bring this war to a speedy conclusion would be, would enhance our image and our stand, not only in the Middle East but elsewhere.

Furthermore, we have spent already six hundred billion dollars and in the long run it’s going to go over a trillion dollars. This is money that we could have been spending on health, education and our own infrastructure. I don’t think we should shy away from taking a stand as we didn’t do during the civil rights.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Time.

Mounir Farah, AR:
Okay, thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
This microphone.

Male speaker: I would like to associate myself with my comments.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Mike, please [inaudible].

Mike Benefiel, MD:
I’m sorry. Mike Benefiel, Middle States. I would like to associate myself with these positive comments about the need to have a discussion on public issues in this body. And now I’m going to speak briefly against this specific wording of this resolution. I agree that it leaves a great deal to be desired. I would like to recommend to my friends here in the House of Delegates that they come forward at Summer Leadership Institute next July and put to work their state councils to craft a resolution that will get the endorsement of this organization, which needs to take a public stance on this pressing question that affects our nation so in, deeply. Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
This microphone.

Trish Radigan, VA:
Trish Radigan, Virginia. Have there or have there not been violations of some of our most fundamental principles? Will we or will we not say something? Thank you.

Dave Kimber, MI:
Dave Kimber from Michigan. I too am against the war in Iraq, but I don’t know if its, I don’t know if this body should start taking public stands on issues like that. Should we also vote on abortion, you know? I, I, I’m personally against it, but I don’t think that we as a body should actually vote on those things.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Seeing no one else at the microphone in favor of this resolution, back to the same side against.

David Rutherford, MS:
David Rutherford from Mississippi Council. The purpose of NCSS, as I understand it is to promote the social studies. And I think this number one resolution take a public stand on behalf of the values and goals taught in social studies and necessary to the practice of our profession is the purpose of this organization and I would support a yes vote on that resolution.

To go beyond and to vote in favor of to do whatever they can to bring the war to Iraq to a speedy conclusion seems to me beyond the mission of this organization. And to echo a previous comment, number one is how to think. Number two is what to think. And so I would urge rewriting this and deleting the, the second point, but including the first one.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We do now have someone at the other side.

Rozella Kirchgaessner, NY:
Rozella Kirchgaessner, ATSS/UFT New York City, New York State. I think that we’re looking at an organization that is, is seeking to represent social studies educators across the nation. I think that we’re looking to bring in underrepresented groups. I think that having a fear of standing up and standing up for principles that our country was founded upon and that we believe in is one of the reasons why we’re not bringing in a whole lot of these underrepresented groups. We don’t speak to the issues that are really important to a lot of people. Whether we want to endorse this particular resolution, because it has some inflammatory language or not, I think we need to take a stand on really important social issues such as this. Thank you.

Lois Wolfe, GA:
Lois Wolff from Georgia. I was crushed when this was tabled. I think if we silence our voice as a national organization for the social studies, we are in trouble. I wish I had been part of the House of Delegates when Carol Hahn and Jim Banks were up here fighting for women’s rights, African American’s rights. But what I take issue with is, we were supposed to focus on just BE IT RESOLVED. And if you look, what it’s asking is that this entire resolution be published in our social publications. I lost two people, family member and friend on 9/11. I have a son in law in the Air Force. I want this war to be brought to a speedy conclusion, but I take issue with the entire publication. You know, I wish those two could be separated.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Go ahead.

Pat Ramsey, AK:
Pat Ramsey, Arkansas Council. The resolution asks us to take a public stand as citizens on behalf of the values and goals that we teach in social studies education. Do we want to leave the session today knowing that we have spent our professional capital on voting to support the Olympics but not voting to take a stand on human rights and the values that we are teaching everyday? Now I have no problem if you are opposed to this, but we, we need to make it public that we are taking a stand one way or another on this issue. Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Yes.

Male speaker: Point of information. How much time do we have available today?

Male speaker:
We still have another five minutes and four seconds.

Male speaker: Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Jeff.

Jeff Passe, NC:
I would like to move that an amendment to eliminate the words “through publication of this resolution in Social Education, “The Social Studies Professional” and other appropriate outlets, including the NCSS website.” In other words, the remaining part of that paragraph but keeping the numbers one and two.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
If I understand that correctly, the amendment you are proposing is the statement would be: BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies urges its members and Associated Groups, 1) to take a public stand as citizens on behalf of the values and goals taught in social studies and necessary to the practice of our profession, and 2) to do whatever they can to bring the Iraq war to a speedy conclusion.

Jeff Passe, NC:
And my reason for doing that is because ultimately this resolution will go to the Board of Directors and then the Board of Directors will decide how to implement it.

Male speaker:
Second.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
It’s been moved and seconded. Is there a discussion on the amendment to the BE IT RESOLVED?

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Because I’m so excited that we are an inclusive House of Delegates, I would also like to add an amendment, a friendly amendment to Jeff’s amendment that we add Association Groups as well, excuse me Communities as well as Associated Groups.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We are now a body of three different types.

Female speaker: It’s been accepted.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
All right. We are now going to vote on the amendment: BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies urges its members, Associated Groups, and Communities, 1) to take a public stand, etc. be to do, 2) to do whatever they can to bring the war to a speedy conclusion. We are now going to vote and we will have the opportunity for yes which is A, no which is B and abstain which is C. And this is only to consider the amendment to the resolution. It passed. Now how many minutes do we have left for a further discussion?

Male speaker: [inaudible] fifteen seconds.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Okay. Recognizing Sue.

Sue Blanchette, TX:
Sue Blanchette, Texas. I just would like a clarification and this was the closest mike. The way this is worded as BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies urges its members and Associate Groups to do one and two. Am I correct that this is not asking NCSS to make a stand? It is simply asking us to urge our members to take a stand?

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
That’s what it reads.

Male speaker: Call the question.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Question, the question has been called. All right. I’m going to, since the question has been called and seconded, I now have to do a voice vote, voice vote to immediately vote. All folks in favor of immediately voting, that’s not saying whether we’re going to pass it or not, but just closing debate, please say aye. Opposed? Abstention? The ayes have it. Debate is closed.

We are moving to vote on the revised resolution which will say, BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies urges its members, Associated Groups, and Communities, 1) to take a public stand as citizens on behalf of the values and goals taught in social studies and necessary to the practice of our profession, and 2) to do whatever they can to bring the Iraq war to a speedy conclusion. We are ready for the vote. This passed fifty four percent to forty six percent.

I’m going to return to the Steering Committee Chair for the remainder of our House of Delegates meeting. Thank you very much. Wait, wait. Wait a second.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
At this point in time, I’d like to call Dustin Frank back to the podium because he has a wonderful announcement for us.

Dustin Frank, Educational Consultant, E-Instruction:
I just wanted to say real quickly, thank you to the committee for letting us come in and kind of showcase our clickers again. We hope we provided you a service. I know it in discussions up here, this thing has been a heated battle. So I’m going to kind of put some joy back in the moment hopefully but. Hopefully we saved you guys some time there. I know we had some extra additional time to debate some things, and talk about it. But could you click back over for me, just real quick [inaudible].

What I’d like to do is, hopefully you enjoyed using the clickers. Many of you are probably from all different areas and fields. And we’d kind of like to show our appreciation in letting us come in and, and work with you all by actually donating two systems to somebody. We’ll actually choose two winners. So I have two sets of 32 clickers that you can take back into your classroom. It’s about a two thousand dollar package. So here’s how this works. I’m going to come down here and choose a random student. You need to know what number you are. If that’s you, please come up and see me and I have a bag of clickers right here for you. And I have two sets, so I’ll do it twice. If you prefer not to have them, just say no thanks and I’ll draw again. Okay?

So here’s the first winner. Number fourteen. Is there a remote fourteen here? And then we’ll do one second one. We thank you guys for letting us come in. Whenever you leave we’ll have people at the back to collect the remotes, but we sure appreciate you letting us come in. Number one sixteen.

Female speaker: While we’re in a season of giving and the spirit of giving, I’d also like to give thanks to Peggy Jackson, Chair of the Steering Committee. On behalf of the House of Delegates and the Steering Committee, we appreciate your leadership and have a plaque to say thank you for her guidance this year.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Chair, Steering Committee:
In the Mexico Turquoise, the framed House of Delegates Manual. Thank you very much.

I’d like to remind you of two quick things. Our evaluations are so valuable to us. Your input is important. Every word you write is taken into consideration as we do this for next year. So would you please turn this information? Take the time to give it back to us. Your feedback is important.

At this time, I’d like to introduce Karen LaConte who is going to speak to us for FASSE. I’d also like to say that at this point in time we are exactly on time. We have seven more minutes and we’re going to make it. Thank you.

Karon LaCompte, TN:
Hello I’m Karon LaCompte from Tennessee. I’d first like to report on the Fund for the Advancement of Social Studies Education in a celebratory manner by telling you that we have exceeded our goal of a hundred thousand dollars. And we are at one hundred and thirteen thousand dollars. But we’re not stopping there. No, no. Our goal now is at two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. We plan to do this through several ways. First of all, we plan to look carefully at our investment of FASSE funds, to look at a planned giving program, and to send letters requesting contributions to past NCSS presidents, to past FASSE Board members and in particular to increase the contributions to the Christa McAuliffe Fund, Reach for the Stars, to send solicitation and contributions to retired astronauts and current astronauts, looking towards out 2008 conference in Houston. We also will be sending letters of request to state councils.

Now speaking of the Reach for the Stars Award, the award for 2008 has been increased to twenty five hundred dollars. So we want our state councils to take particular note to encourage teachers to apply for this award. And in 2009, the Board has voted to increase the award to five thousand dollars to make a difference in social studies in each and every classroom.

We continue with the CUFA FASSE Inquiry Grant, which will be ten thousand dollars awarded next year. And we are combining a joint effort with CUFA to focus on the theme of social justice for this particular next grant. So we encourage researchers to think about possibilities for this.

Finally, there is a social studies session, History in a Box from last year’s winner for the Christa McAuliffe Fund. It is in 29D at 10:30 in just a few moments.

And finally, we want to say, in honor of our President, Gayle Thieman, that those of you have contributed to FASSE this year, we would like to encourage you to encourage one of your colleagues to contribute as well. In other words, Each One Reach One. Thank you.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
We are at the close of the House of Delegates. We have a few announcements. One is that those committees that we just elected new members to the House of Delegates committees, Resolutions, Steering Committee and Assignments. And they need to meet for a few minutes outside of the door. So we want to make sure they get a chance to get together. We want to thank Kim Goldsworthy, our parliamentarian.

And I want to remind you, please let your council presidents know there is a meeting for state council presidents at 2:45 in the Hyatt, Emma A I believe. It’s in the program.

There’s still International Film Festival tickets. And we would very much appreciate selling all those tickets because we have four directors, one from Korea, one from Quebec, two Americans. And we really want a great turnout at our mini Sundance. Those tickets are still available. It buys you a drink for six dollars. And I know it costs a lot more if you shell out your own cash, so. It, we’d appreciate that, going down and getting the tickets. And I recognize Steven Johnson.

Steven Johnson:
Madam President, it has been a longstanding tradition in the House of Delegates that past presidents recognize the current president for the hard work they have done and for running a very well organized House of Delegates. Thank you Gayle very much for doing that this year.

Gayle Thieman, OR, NCSS President:
Please make sure you turn in your evaluation forms. And this House of Delegates is adjourned. See you in Houston.

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