53rd House of Delegates Meeting Transcript

89 Annual Meeting of the National Council for the Social Studies

53rd House of Delegates
November 13-14, 2009
Atlanta, Georgia

Session One

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Good afternoon, I am Syd Golston. I’m the President of the National Council for the Social Studies. And I’m sitting up here instead of where I’ve been for so many years at the Arizona table. At this time I’d like to introduce you to Jane Eason, President of the South Carolina Council for the Social Studies. Ms. Eason will lead us in the Pledge of Allegiance to the United States.

Jane Eason, President, South Carolina Council for the Social Studies:

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Welcome to the 53rd House of Delegates. And I’d like you to meet the people sitting on the podium with me. This is Tara Sides, the Steering Committee chair. Anton Schulski, doing our technology for the Steering Committee. Gloria Cofer, our parliamentarian. I would like to mention that the minutes for last year’s meeting have been approved by the House of Delegates Steering Committee. This is done because the 52nd House of Delegates is not the same as the 53rd.

For the adoption of the agenda. The agenda is printed in the House of Delegates Manual pages 5-6. Give you a moment to find that. Are there any changes to the agenda? Hearing none, the agenda as printed will be the agenda for the 53rd House of Delegates.

The House of Delegates is an integral part of the organization of the National Council for the Social Studies. It gives members of NCSS the opportunity to participate in the development of policies to guide NCSS. It serves as a forum for issues that relate to the profession of social studies and the organization of NCSS. The House of Delegates serves as the business meeting for NCSS and offers the President the opportunity to give a State of the Council address. Finally, it provides an opportunity for delegates to develop, debate and approve resolutions to guide NCSS. Resolutions represent the principles, beliefs and actions of the general membership of NCSS as represented by the House of Delegates. Resolutions express the ideas, recommendations, issues and concerns relevant to NCSS and its work to promote quality teaching and learning of social studies. These resolutions provide direction to the NCSS Board of Directors for current and future work of NCSS.

And in my welcoming letter you will read the bullets of several things that were passed as resolutions that have become activities and policy for our entire organization. I’d like to introduce Charles Vaughan from the South Carolina for the Social Studies representing the Credentials Committee.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

We are waiting on Charles Vaughan. He’s still back there counting to see how many of you all that are actually certified. So, I’m just going to take a second to give him a few more minutes and go ahead and introduce the Steering Committee. I keep watching back there for Charles. Okay. Okay.

At this time, on behalf of the HOD. Oh here he comes. I saw him running. Here comes Charles Vaughan from South Carolina with our report. And you all, if you’ve ever been a part of the Credentials Committee. It is crazy because all of you all are coming in and you’re trying to get credentialed. And Charles has about five minutes to make sure everybody is counted and so we know exact number of who’s in here. And so he’s going to give that report right now.

Charles Vaughan, SC, Chair, Credentials Committee:

I am pleased to introduce the Credentials Committee. Barbara Hairfield from South Carolina and Joan Hollins from Colorado. And they are back there but they are busy. As chair of the Credentials Committee, I am pleased to report that a hundred and seventy delegates are registered and certified to vote in the House of Delegates as of 3:50 today, Friday, November 13th, 2009. On behalf of the Credentials Committee, I move adoption of the Credentials Committee report.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

The motion is on the adoption of the credentials report as just read. Those in favor, please say aye. Opposed say no. The ayes have it. The credentials have been accepted.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

And good afternoon. My name is Tara Sides and I’m the Steering Committee Chair. And I’m going to kind of be taking you through things this afternoon. On behalf of the HOD Steering Committee, welcome to Atlanta, Georgia and the 53rd House of Delegates. We would like to extend a welcome to delegates of affiliated state councils, associated groups, National Council of the Social Studies communities, local and regional councils, as well as affiliated councils. We are excited to have you all here.

At this time I would like to acknowledge a mistake that occurred in your HOD Manual. In the committee section, you were given a pink sheet that shows the revised. But Lois Wolff is incorrectly listed as the chair of the Assignment Committee. The chair is actually Marjorie Hunter. And you all, the Assignment Committee does so much work and I just want to make sure that Marjorie is recognized for that. And I want her to know personally that I’m sorry that this happened. Marjorie where are you? Okay if you’ll just stand so everybody can see you. It’s my mistake that it was left off and the chair was incorrect. And in the words of Pearl Buck, every great mistake has a half way moment, a split second when it can be recalled and remedied. I hope we’ve remedied it, remedied it. I can’t talk today.

At this time I would like to introduce members of the 2009 HOD Steering Committee and extend a special note of gratitude for their time and commitment to making these meetings as smooth and informative and engaging. So first, I’d like the, my vice chair, Ted Banton is not here. He is from Florida. He was called home on a family emergency. So Ted is not here with us, but I wanted you all to know that he is a part of this committee and he will be leading you all next year through this process. Keith Dauer who is from Connecticut. Shelly Singer from Illinois. Anton Schulski from Colorado, who is running our technology. And Elizabeth Hines from CUFA. She is representing CUFA. And I’m sorry, and Anton is representing the Canadian Community even though he is from Colorado. And Ana Post is our NCSS Liaison who serves with us.

This meeting couldn’t happen without them. Anybody who knows me knows this could not happen without them. They did a tremendous job making sure that I really stayed on task in pulling everything together. And they are to definitely be commended for all of their hard work.

Right now we are going to talk about the importance of HOD evaluations. The evaluation form is the goldenrod form that is in your packet. And you all, this is so important, and you won’t fill it out until Saturday. And we’re going to do the first part with clickers. But I just wanted you all to go ahead and be aware of it and be thinking about it because we’re going to take this from you on Saturday and we expect to have one from everyone.

Each year the House of Delegates Steering Committee reviews evaluations and we adjust the procedures of the House of Delegates based on your feedback. Your feedback and recommendations are essential in guiding the work of the Steering Committee in planning next year’s House of Delegates sessions. And when I say, essential you all, I mean we really do look at this and make changes based on what you say. In your packet you’ll find the evaluation sheet that I’ve showed you. It’s printed on the goldenrod paper.

For the second year in a row we will be completing this evaluation using clickers at the end of the second House of Delegates session on Saturday. However, you’re still going to need to complete the written form so you can provide us with open ended comments. The open ended comments are essential. We get some of the best feedback for areas of improvement based on your written comments. Please remember to submit these written comments at the conclusion of the House of Delegates on Saturday.

Now I’d like to share some of the accomplishments this year with the Steering Committee and changes that we made to the House of Delegates based on your feedback. The feedback from the 52nd House of Delegates was analyzed and several changes were made based on your comments. Each session of the House of Delegates will open with the Pledge of Allegiance. Even with our flag that our parliamentarian had. And this was based on a suggestion from a delegate last year. They said we’re social studies teachers, we should be opening our sessions with the Pledge of Allegiance. So that’s a change that was made based on your feedback.

Another change was to the nomination form for the House of Delegates. Last year, you all know that we instituted some changes with the nomination process based on feedback and then just reflection on how that process went. We made changes to that nomination form. And we feel like that’s going to make this process a lot smoother for everyone.

Based on our use of clickers, the electronic clickers last year on the second day, we have instituted time limits on voting for this year for committee and resolutions that will come up on Saturday. We are hoping that these time limits are really going to expedite and clear up confusion during voting, during the voting process.

And in an effort to save paper, we will not be printing one resolution per page as we’ve done in the past. Multiple resolutions will be listed per page and there’ll be page numbers at the bottom. So the House of Delegates has officially gone green.

This year, per your feedback last year, we will be trying to reach out beyond the conference attendees at the House of Delegates sessions to the general NCSS membership in social studies or other public via technology based efforts. For the first time, NCSS hosted two webinars this summer in place of Summer Leadership. One webinar was focused completely on the resolutions process. This webinar was very well received by our council, and community, and group leaders. And we are excited about the collaboration that came out of those webinars and the quality of resolutions that emerged from this process. And I think you all are going to be excited too.

This year speeches for candidates of the Board of Directors will be recorded as is all of the House of Delegates sessions, if you all see the camera over there, with the, and barring any technology glitches, we’re hoping these are going to be posted online so anyone can listen to these sessions, listen to the speeches at anytime. And so this is going to allow membership of, members of NCSS and the general public to see what happens when a bunch of social studies teachers get together.

We will also be investigating the possibility of doing a social networking site for the House of Delegates to post information about accomplishments of the 2009 House of Delegates. And this would be another place you can post feedback about the House of Delegates. If that’s something, or you have some suggestions about how that could look, a good place to put that would be on your evaluation form. If you can think of something that you would like to see technology-wise for the House of Delegates to do, it would be greatly appreciated.

At this time I’m going to go over the nomination and election process for House of Delegate committees. During the first session, and this is the first session, of the House of Delegates, nominations to the House of Delegate committees will be submitted in writing using the nomination forms in your packet. And it is this blue one. This is the form that you’re going to submit nominations on. These need to be turned in. You’re going to have until 4:35. These need to be turned in to the back of the room to a Steering Committee member. And they’ll make themselves available. But if you start waving one of these in the air, somebody is going to come pick it up. Okay? So this just needs to be completed by 4:35.

You must be eligible to run for a committee. Eligibility information is available in the House of Delegates packet. Seated delegates of affiliated councils, associated groups and communities are eligible for all House of Delegates committees in compliance with the eligibility requirements as defined in Article X, Section IV and Article X, Section IX. And these are located in your House of Delegates Manual if you would like, if you would like to read them.

The committee eligibility listing, in compliance with Article X, Section VII, is available in the HOD Manual, Appendix G, pages thirty-three through thirty-five. It’s labeled the Scorecard, Scoreboard for Eligibility for the HOD Committees. And if you look at your state, or you look at your group and it’ll show you what committees you’re eligible to nominate people on.

The process of nominations to committees is available in the HOD Manual on pages twenty-five through twenty six. You’ll see it as Article X, Elections to Steering, Resolutions and Assignment. Please review this section before completing nomination forms to make sure the person you’re nominating is eligible. Please submit nominations to Steering Committee members at the appropriate point in the meeting, which is as soon as you get them filled out.

Nomination forms are due at 4:35 and should be submitted to Steering Committee members. As time approaches, a member of the Steering Committee will hold up a sign that says nominations are due. We will not stop the meeting to make the announcement. And you all, right now, we’re probably running a little bit ahead of schedule. So 4:35 will probably happen when we’re doing something else. So it’s your responsibility to make sure those forms at 4:35 are given to the Steering Committee.

Information from nomination forms will be compiled and organized by the Steering Committee for distribution to the House of Delegates prior to voting in the second House of Delegates session. Candidates for Steering, Resolutions and Assignment will be introduced today at the end of first session.

Candidates will need to let us know. And you all this is a change. We tried it last year and then we’re still working on this. But candidates will let us know their name and the organization they represent. So the affiliated council, the associated group, or the community, or the state at the conclusion of the first session of the House of Delegates. Only the name and the organization candidates are represented will be stated during the first session of the House of Delegates because the candidate qualifications will be given to you at the beginning of the second session of the House of Delegates. So we’re not going to have to go through a long process of everybody introducing. So this way you’ll have the qualifications written in front of you at the second session. No introductions are going to be made in the second session. Candidate information is going to be available at the beginning of that second session, and the names of candidates will be read aloud prior to voting. Voting for the HOD committees will occur at the beginning of second session.

And so that’s why it’s so important that you are here and you are certified by 8:00. Because if you are here after 8:00 when we start the voting, which usually begins at 8:20, you will not be allowed to vote. So you need to make sure tomorrow morning that you are here by 8:00 and you are certified. Because if you are here after 8:20 and after the certification occurs, you will not be eligible to vote. Is everybody clear with that?

The Steering and Credentials Committee are going to verify eligibility of nominees and create an electronic ballot for each committee following the first HOD session.

To be eligible to vote delegates must be registered and certified for the second session tomorrow. Certification of delegates occurs prior to the session. And you must register again tomorrow. And you all were given your card. I think it’s blue for tomorrow. And you’ll bring that back up and recertify. Once certified, you’re going to get a clicker, ‘cause we do our voting by clickers.

And a closed door policy exists where only certified delegates may vote for the HOD committees. Clickers will not be activated after delegates have been certified as of 8:20. And so it’s just really important for you to be here tomorrow before voting begins.

At this time I’d like to turn it back over to the President who is going to give her message and State of the Council Address.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Thanks. Welcome to all. We’re proud to reconvene our newly expanded House of Delegates. This is the second year that we have voting members from our associated groups and our communities. Please stand if you are here representing a community or an associated group. It’s great to have this venue to hear the full voice of NCSS.

Faced with financial constraints, this year we had to think outside the box to reach our affiliates. We did it in a twenty-first century way, as you heard Tara tell you. We held two very popular webinars during the summer and then we met yesterday in a leadership conclave attended by a great many state representatives. We were joined by Della Cronin of Washington Partners, our lobbyist, who gave valued updates on education initiatives in Congress and on the Obama-Duncan horizon. We had sessions on accessing funds from ARRA, on partnerships, and many of us presented to each other the best of what we do.

Outreach to the state organizations has deepened this year as Board of Directors members contact state presidents. My councils were Arizona, of course, but also Michigan. After a great long chat with Tom Webb last spring, I am now on the Michigan Listserve, receiving their newsletters and their mailings. I would never have known about that outstanding Michigan social studies Olympiad without this connection. And we each are developing connections to our assigned states. Each of the Board members has three or four partner state councils and I know that all of us are trying to meet our state presidents face to face. So come find us if we haven’t found you yet. And here’s what we look like.

First our officers: Michael Yell from Wisconsin, Past President. Steve Goldberg from New York, President-Elect. Sue Blanchette of Texas, Vice President. And now BOD members: Karen Burgard of Indiana. Bruce Damasio of Maryland. Michelle Herczog of California. Nan Jones from South Carolina. Mike Koren, Wisconsin. Mert Martens, Oklahoma. Roxanna Mechem from Missouri. Karen York [Muir?] from Maryland. Kim O’Neil of the New York Council. Beth Ratway from Wisconsin. Cynthia Tyson from Ohio. Jack Wilson from Missouri. A lot of Missouri, huh? And Tara Sides of South Carolina. So if your council is, has been contacted by one of these Board members and you’d like to, you know, just say, you know where they are.

Finally, here’s a summary of some NCSS initiatives that are important to me. We could spend a long time giving you a State of the Council Address. I’ve just picked the things I care most about. When we give our reports to our own Board, we organize them by our mission statement goals. So I’ve done that.

The first of them is the education and knowledge goal. And I didn’t write this in this speech last, two weeks ago, but when I looked out at how many people were interested in hearing Eric Phoner, I thought, now there’s a knowledge goal fulfilled. That was wonderful. As the reauthorization of ESEA and the movement towards core standards advance, we benefit from advice from our affiliates on how curriculum is guided by them in several different settings. We are working in collaboration with other subject area organizations, NCTE, NSTA, NCTM and others, National Middle School, to produce a statement called Principles of Learning, which exemplifies the kind of learning we support and which has been jeopardized in the NCLB model. We also plan to produce a position statement on social studies standards and testing. These will be our things we bring to the table when reauthorization does finally occur.

The reissue this spring, that we plan, I hope it happens by spring, of Expectations of Excellence, our NCSS curriculum framework, which we still call standards because that’s the lingual franca, but they’re much more than laundry lists of facts, repeats to the educational community, goals of civic education that transcend rote memory. What our students know and are able to do surpasses mere recall.

We have some plans for ancillary publications. One of them will be called Twenty-First Century Skills Through The NCSS Standards. And the other one I have been likening to a novel written by four women in New York City who just decided they wanted a blockbuster best seller. And they picked the title before they wrote the book. It was called Naked Came the Stranger. Our version of that is Teaching Reading With The NCSS Standards.

In September I had the opportunity to speak and travel in New Zealand where social studies standards consist of curriculum frameworks like those at NCSS. They design curriculum from guiding principles that emphasize the community, their multicultural heritage, the future, and individual students’ needs. For example at Mount Hutt College, which is secondary school there, in the foothills of the Waimakariri River Basin, World History is connected all year this year to water issues. They have created their standards bottom up. Fifteen thousand social studies educators were consulted before any core standards were written for the nation of New Zealand. It’s a great model.

Now for the advocacy and visibility goal. The many initiatives that present the social studies agenda to the constituencies that will write NCLB and frame the next years of educational policy include some that are very high profile. We are working with the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, a collaboration among organizations in many fields, which is writing, rewriting its maps. ICT oriented, but twenty-first century learning is also standards based and content grounded. And we are working on getting our map to look even more content oriented than it was.

We are also collaborating with the National Association for the Education of Young Children to write a position statement on social studies for pre-school children, which will serve both of our organizations as public schooling in many states moves to include pre-schoolers.

Membership goal. This is the heart of what I’d like to say today. We’re launching a campaign that has several different facets to rebuild membership because, like other organizations, we have lost membership in this recession. Our campaign is called Growing Our Numbers and we will feature membership brokering, online outreach and service to pre-service teachers. This is three pronged here at its center. We also are continuing all the efforts like Each One Reach One that we’ve had before.

I’d like to spend some time explaining the two for one membership brokering. This initiative offers for one year only a membership in both NCSS and the state council for just the price of NCSS membership. Depending on which kind of membership, the sixty-two dollar membership, which does not include comprehensive bulletins or the seventy three dollar one that does. This means that anyone who signs up to be an NCSS and let’s say Arizona affiliate member will pay, let’s say they don’t want the comprehensive membership, sixty two dollars. Your council will receive back from NCSS the membership fee which your affiliate charges, in Arizona’s case twenty dollars, or thirty one dollars, half of the sixty two, whichever is more. So we in Arizona stand to make money if we can increase the number of dual members.

For most councils, that does represent additional profit. We know some of you are sitting there thinking, ah we’re not going to make much on that. But you will because we will not keep any of the money if we can’t match what you, your membership fee is. This will give you an additional voice in the House of Delegates and in the election of leadership and, most of all, in the accessing of really high level professional development and thinking for your state.

For pre-service teaching, we will be offering a community for pre-service teachers. And we have discovered that there are student councils, four of them throughout the country, that may be able a model for having NCSS pre-service councils.

NCSS 2.0. It’ called the Net Working for Social Studies. Our newest website enhancements include our new American History Lessons Index. So everything written about American History can be accessed by topic from the website. There’ll be updates on grant and seminar opportunities and bulletin boards for our communities and community interests that will be increased.

We have many other plans that we can’t really quite advertise yet. But they represent really radical attempts to reach out and get people to join.

As far as Each One Reach One is concerned, I do want to repeat that for anybody who hasn’t been a member very long. We will continue to provide published acknowledgement for you and a chance to win a prize when you register other people to be members of NCSS.

Now for the citizenship goal, which is very near and dear to my heart. Civic alliances in the states are publicizing model projects, gathering data and working toward meaningful performance assessments in civic education subjects. NCSS nominated Mike Horn for a position on the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB), which governs NAPE testing. We don’t know if he’s going to get it. He’d better. But whatever happens, we stand behind more frequent and increased testing samples in history, geography and civics and data disaggregated by states so that there will be a test for social studies even in states that do not have their own.

I always find that when I speak in behalf of citizenship needs and responsibilities and the special role of social studies in the community, teachers come up to me and ask for my PowerPoint or just to shake hands and say that it helped them to hear it. I hope so. In these times, we’ve never been more important.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

At this time I’d like to see if there is any questions from the floor about the report you just heard. Any questions from the floor? You can step up to the microphone. There’s a microphone right there sir.

Male speaker:

[Inaudible].

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

SGolston@NCSS.org

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Okay any other questions? Okay.

At this time we’ll accept the President’s report. And I would also like to thank President Golston for her report and her hard work. Syd has worked tirelessly for this organization this year and I know has visited many of your states and state conferences and just has worked so hard for social studies and for this organization. I would also like to thank the NCSS officers, and Board of Directors, and the staff for the National Council for the Social Studies because they also do a very very hard job and they do an excellent job with everything that relates to social studies. So if everybody could just give all of them a round of applause.

Okay. And at this time I would like to ask Marjorie Hunter, chair of the Assignment Committee, to come to the stage and give her report. And also remind you if you have filled out nomination forms to please give them to a Steering Committee member. If you have anymore, Liz is in the back. Or you can bring them up front to Anna, either way. Thank you.

Marjorie Hunter, AR, Chair, Assignment Committee:

Good afternoon. I’m Marjorie Hunter from the Arkansas Council of Social Studies. I’d like to introduce the Assignments Committee at this time. Justin Lovelace from South Carolina who is not able to be here. He is, again, with a family emergency. Ron Adams from New Hampshire. Sandy Senior Dauer from Connecticut. Robert Nemitz from Illinois and Lois Wolff from Georgia.

We had more applications this year for the Operations Committee than we’ve had in the last two years. We had something like twenty one applications this year. All of them were wonderful. And we had a difficult time making some choices. However, we selected Melinda Odom Staubs from Maryland and Carly J. Mole from Nevada for the Conference Committee. Andrew Potter from Virginia and Whit Grace from Mississippi for Government and Public Relations. David Stewart from Ohio, Deborah, and I’m not sure how to say her name, Clich\xE9 from Colorado for Membership. Jason Stacey from Illinois and Jeffrey Hawkins from Oklahoma for Publications. Rebecca Sanchez from New Mexico, Stacey Anson from Connecticut for Awards. Marjorie Hunter from Arkansas and James McNeil, South Carolina for Archives. I’d like to make the motion to present this slate. It is already approved? Okay. She tells me it is already approved. All right, thank you.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Okay, at this time I’d like to ask Terry Cherry to come forward to introduce the Resolutions Committee and talk to you about the resolutions process and the role it plays in the House of Delegates. So, Terry Cherry from Texas. You all know he is our Chair of Resolutions. He also served as our chair last year.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you. The Resolutions Committee are as follows: Jacqueline Reynolds from Michigan. She is not here. And the rest of you, if you are here would you please stand? Robert Dytell from New York, Jeanette Stepanski from Tennessee, Bill Harris from Ohio, and Brad Burnhide from Kansas.

Now the Resolutions Committee, as you know, had some changes. For the past fifteen years, Summer Leadership, with, NCSS has relied on Summer Leadership to create resolutions. This system has worked and it’s provided great resolutions in the past. And NCSS is thankful for those of you who have worked, and I am sure many of you in this room today have been a part of this method. But as those of us who can remember Bob Dylan singing Times Are a Changing. And of course all of us can remember President Obama’s theme of change. The same goes for NCSS.

Writing resolutions at Summer Leadership primarily had two representatives participating from each state council. This gave limited input from each council. We would like to suggest that state councils and affiliates write resolutions from their members. This can be accomplished at their local conferences, committees, e-mails and many other methods. Following this pattern would allow the state councils and affiliate members to participate and have a broad representation from all members. This method could involve non-NCSS members and allow their input on a national level, which may open their eyes to see the importance of joining NCSS. Remember, the more local NCSS members, the more delegates to the House of Delegates and a larger representation from your council and affiliates.

The future of Summer Leadership is dependent on funding that is uncertain in these changing economic times. Whether Summer Leadership can continue to take place or not, it is time for state councils and affiliates to have their members involved in creating resolutions. Resolutions is our voice to the NCSS Board of Directors. Resolutions give NCSS members opportunity to provide direction, direction for NCSS policymaking. We need to hear from the membership, not just a chosen few. Change is difficult for many. But this change will give a voice to many that will be heard by NCSS. The time to change our resolution writing process is here and will create a better representation and future for NCSS.

Now I’d like to share how we did the resolutions and the process we went through this year. We did have proposed resolutions were developed at the Summer Leadership Webinar for e-mail to affiliates councils, associated groups and communities in October 2009. Then there were three calls for resolution were made prior to October 31st deadline for the electronic submission of resolutions.

A new packet of resolutions were distributed at the opening of today’s HOD session. Resolutions are printed on white paper. This packet includes changes to proposed resolutions, resolutions submitted electronically in October and at the opening hearing of resolutions. Today’s resolutions have been revised, ordered and edited by the Resolutions Committee. And we did that this morning.

For information concerning the resolutions process in the HOD sessions, please refer to the HOD Manual, Article IX, Resolutions, Section III. Resolution numbers, titles and BE IT RESOLVED or actions will be read into record prior to delegates debate and voting during the second HOD session, which is tomorrow, November 14th. Please refer to the New Resolutions packet for the complete version of all proposed resolutions.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

At this time are there any resolutions from the floor? If there is a resolution from the floor, let me refer you to Article IX Resolution, Section V. And I don’t see anybody jumping up to bring a resolution forward with their two hundred and fifty copies in their hand. So I think it’s pretty safe for us to move on.

At this time I would like to present the one NCSS Constitutional Amendment that we have. It’s located on the green sheet in your packet, if you want to look along with me. This year we have one amendment to be presented to the House of Delegates. The process for amending the NCSS Constitution is outlined on page twenty nine of the NCSS Constitution in the House of Delegates Manual.

Per procedures, this amendment was introduced last year to the 52nd House of Delegates. This year it’s presented to you for approval to place on the ballot. It will be sent to the general membership in the spring. Two-thirds of the House of Delegates must approve the amendment for it to be placed on the ballot. Today it will be introduced and tomorrow during the second session it will be voted on. The amendment is printed on this green sheet again in your packet.

And I’m going to read it to you the way it will read if it is amended. It deals with vacancies in the NCSS officer positions. The following policy was approved by the Board of Directors at its February 2007 meeting and confirmed at its May 2008 meeting. This change to the NCSS Constitution requires a constitutional amendment. The amendment changes the procedures for filling officer vacancies. Please look on the green sheet in your packet and I will read the amendment as it will read if amended. It’s Article II, Section III.

The President-Elect and Vice-President shall assume such duties as the President or Board of Directors shall specify. In case of a vacancy in any officer position, the NCSS Executive Committee shall nominate an interim officer to fill the remainder of the vacant term. That nomination must be approved by the entire Board of Directors. If the interim appointment is a currently serving officer, for example, the Vice-President becoming President-Elect, the remaining vacant office shall be filled in the same manner.

If you want to look at the procedure for amendments, it is on page twenty nine of your HOD Manual. Okay, are there any questions? Yes sir.

Male speaker:

[inaudible].

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

The question is what’s the current term of office for President and Vice-President? And it’s one year. One year. Yes sir.

Male speaker:

[inaudible].

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

I can’t answer that. What he wants to know is why it’s going to be by the Board of Directors instead of the entire body, right? Oh. And you all, I’m sorry. This debate is tomorrow. I was wrong in asking for questions. This debate and questions will happen tomorrow. That’s my fault. It’s the teacher in me. Sorry. But this debate will happen tomorrow and so we’ll have some people who can answer your questions about that. Okay?

Okay you all. At this time we’re supposed to continue with the collection of nomination forms that happens at 4:35. We are about six minutes ahead of schedule, so we’re going to jump ahead. And what this means, at 4:35 we’re going to flash something on the screen and at that time nomination forms will be due and they have to be in at that time.

So we’re going to move on to the Candidate Forum for NCSS. So if you are a candidate running for an office, Liz is going to be over in the corner and she’s going to help you all line up. And I’m also going to ask Michael Yell to come to the front. And he is going to do some introductions and lead us through the Candidate Forum. So if you are a candidate running for an NCSS office, you need to come line up in the corner to get ready for your speech and I’m going to turn it over to Michael Yell.

Michael Yell, WI, President, National Council for the Social Studies:

Thank you. The candidates will have, for the vice-presidential candidates, will have five minutes for their presentation. And the other candidates will have three minutes. And Keith Dauer will be keeping time with help from Shelly Singer. So if the candidates could walk over to, walk over to that side of the room and line up, you’ll, I’ll be introducing you.

I’d also like to introduce our 2010 NCSS President and ask him to stand, and that is Steve Goldberg. And our 2010 President-Elect Sue Blanchette.

Okay we’ll start with the speech first vice-presidential speech and that will be Dennis Spanks.

Dennis Spanks, NY, Candidate for NCSS Vice-President:

Wherever the camera is. Hi, my name is Dennis Spanks. For those of you who keep track of these things, I was born in Arkansas, college in Maryland, spent most of my adult life teaching in Florida, yeah okay. And then, proudly moved to the great Empire state of New York where I’ve been for the last twenty years. It would be an honor for me to serve as your Vice-President, President-Elect and President. I have been a proud member of this organization for over twenty-five years, affiliated with state councils in both Florida and New York. I have served previously on the NCSS Board, worked on committees, SIGs, now communities. I have experience as a classroom teacher, college professor, administrator, department chair and non-profit organization president. And just a slight aside, in these days of tight budgets, non-profits are feeling it everywhere. So not just within the education. So I have had experience with how to stretch the dollar.

Since my first NCSS national conference about twenty years ago in Orlando, I’ve been hooked. Thousands of people, it seemed, were in the same space who were just like me. Argumentative, opinionated, strong-willed, you recognize yourselves, kind, caring, just wonderful people who shared a love of debate, a love of thinking, a love of the job. I’ve made some true friends through NCSS. Okay, they’re argumentative, and opinionated, strong-willed people, but dear friends. They and my students will tell you I’m a conciliator, a listener, a consensus builder, all qualities I think important to hold office in this organization.

So, I was talking to a friend, actually, my attorney, the other day, you can be both, and told him I was running for office of NCSS. His response well was what we would hope. This big grin came on his face as he remembered some of the great social studies teachers he had had while growing up. He looked at me and he said, “It’s all about context.” He actually talks that way.

In today’s world of sound bites and tweets, talking heads and battling pundits as Syd said this morning, civil discourse appears to be gone in this country. Students are more likely to get their news from John Stewart or Saturday Night Live than from the network newscasts. Little discussion goes beyond thirty seconds. It is our role as social studies teachers to train the next generation to expect deeper analysis and contextualization. Social studies is not all about facts and figures. It’s about thoughts and concepts, context.

Well somehow our conversation went on its way and ended up with Harry Truman. But most conversations with this friend do. And I have a Truman quote: “There is nothing new in the world except the history you do not know.” Well I don’t know if you will elect me but I do know that I will work hard every day to deserve your trust. Thank you.

Michael Yell, WI, President, National Council for the Social Studies:

And our second vice-presidential candidate, John Moore.

John Moore, KY, Candidate for NCSS Vice-President:

Good afternoon. I’m John Moore from the Kentucky Council and I am delighted and honored to announce my candidacy for Vice-President, President-Elect and President and Past President hopefully of National Council for the Social Studies. I’m originally from Lexington, Kentucky. I currently serve as an Associate Professor of Middle Level and Secondary Education, specifically social studies education, at Western Kentucky University. I have served as a faculty member at Western for twenty years. Two of those years I served as Interim Chair of the Department of Middle Level and Secondary Education. Before coming to Western I taught middle school social studies in Lexington for ten years and before that two years of high school social studies on Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota.

Throughout my twenty-five years of membership and participation in this illustrious organization, I have observed leaders who are visionary, proactive and genuinely devoted to the ideals and purposes of social studies education. My agenda as NCSS Vice-President is to continue the same if not even more enthusiasm and strong work ethic for a stronger NCSS and greater advocacy for social studies education in P-16 schools.

NCSS has identified at least four specific goals that should be regularly planned, implemented, monitored and evaluated. And these goals are social studies education and knowledge, membership, citizenship and advocacy. I would like to briefly discuss an idea for enhancing our membership goal.

Within the past four years NCSS membership has declined by at least four thousand members. Such decline is due heavily to economic difficulties that have confronted our school systems, our institutions of higher learning and individual households. NCSS must aggressively challenge our membership decline by implementing new strategies for the enhancement of membership growth.

One NCSS strategy is to recruit pre-service teachers for NCSS membership and annual conference participation. Pre-service social studies teachers are vital to the future of NCSS. They bring new perspectives to the organization and their presence help identify future NCSS leaders.

During last year’s Houston conference, Terry Cherry, Joe O’Brien and I facilitated a vital issues session entitled, “What Can NCSS Do For Pre-Service Teachers?” Nearly thirty pre-service teachers attended the session and they expressed their strong desire to be visible and active within our organization. NCSS has identified pre-service teachers as an underrepresented group within the organization. On tomorrow, I will chair the underrepresented group task force meeting in which some pre-service teachers will more than likely attend. The task force plans to recommend to the Board of Directors that NCSS support the implementation of university based student organizations on college campuses throughout our nation. A strong NCSS pre-service teacher component will not only contribute to the membership growth, but it will strengthen our efforts in achieving the remaining three goals of social studies education and knowledge, citizenship and advocacy.

In closing, we all know that National Council for the Social Studies is a professional organization that is highly respected by its peers, the school administration and the general public. I would be honored to serve as your Vice-President. And I will put forth my best efforts in enhancing NCSS membership, knowledge and education, citizenship and advocacy. Thank you for your time and I value your vote. Thank you.

Michael Yell, WI, President, National Council for the Social Studies:

And our Elementary candidate is Kim O’Neil.

Kim O’Neil, NY, Candidate for Elementary:

Good afternoon. I’m Kim O’Neil. As a veteran elementary teacher from Central New York, I am passionate about the importance of elementary students receiving a strong social studies education. I feel it is essential to keep social studies as a core subject at this level in order to maintain our foundation of democracy. These students are not future citizens. They are citizens. They require the teaching of social studies in order to best serve that role.

As an NCSS Elementary representative for the past two years, I have worked diligently to improve the teaching and learning of social studies. And in this NCSS leadership role, I’ve met with my New York state Congressman to discuss the impact that NCLB is having on social studies education especially at the elementary level. For if change, for if change is to occur, our political leaders must understand the effect of a citizen without a strong background in social studies.

So let me share my top ten fears if we fail. Ten: a citizen who is helpful only to himself. Nine: a citizen who cannot explain the meaning behind the national holidays other than they make for a long weekend. Eight: a citizen who cannot locate fifty, the fifty states let alone Iraq and Afghanistan on a map. Seven: a citizen who feels that nature’s resources are unlimited. Six: a citizen who believes that Survivor is a simulation of democracy. Five: a citizen who thinks that the world thinks or should think like he thinks. Four: a citizen who does not concern himself with the responsibility of voting. Three: a citizen who does not understand other cultures and finds little value in participating in a global society. Two: a citizen who does not comprehend propaganda, and believes all that he sees and hears regardless of what newspaper, television pundit, or politician says. And one: no citizen at all.

With those thoughts in mind, I urge you to think about what you can do to keep social studies education in the forefront of the elementary curriculum as I will do if I were elected. Thank you.

Michael Yell, WI, President, National Council for the Social Studies:

Our first candidate for the Secondary teacher spot is Peggy Jackson.

Peggy Jackson, NM, Candidate for Secondary:

I’m glad I followed Kim. I embrace that idea. Good afternoon. Today, as social studies educators, we know that Congress is still struggling with the healthcare bill. And we don’t know the outcome. We know that President Obama is still pondering what to do about the troop level in Afghanistan. And we don’t know the outcome. My high school seniors weigh in weekly on this discussion on my Twitter through controversial issue format. What we don’t know today is what will be in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act when it is authorized next year by Congress. We know that the goal of our organization is creating effective citizens.

Yesterday at NSSSA an additional enhancement to this definition that an effective citizen is proactive. We as an organization of educators, must be proactive to ensure that social studies is not left behind this time. The strength that I bring is my advocacy for civic education that creates effective citizens who engage in participatory democracy and have learned the art of deliberation with civility. And my promise to you is that I will bring you my experiences in this organization, my passion as a secondary teacher, and my promise of hard work.

I will add, since I have time that I carry my U.S. Constitution with me all the time in my purse. And my daughter tells me it will go with me when I die. This is my passion. And I hope that you will allow me to use my passions, and my experiences, and my work ethic to serve this organization. Thank you.

Michael Yell, WI, President, National Council for the Social Studies:

Our secondary, other Secondary candidate is Hillary Rosenthal.

Hillary Rosenthal, IL, Candidate for Secondary:

I have to lower the microphone. Good afternoon. I’m Hillary Rosenthal. I was born, raised, educated and employed in Illinois. I’m not sure that I should admit that given the reputation of Illinois politics. But I promise not to engage in any of those activities.

I’ve been kind of a, a career gypsy. After one year teaching middle school, which gave me a lifelong appreciation of those of you who teach middle school because I couldn’t do it for more than a year. I’ve taught in seven different high schools and pretty much every subject you could imagine high school students taking. But the one constant thread for me has been NCSS. I am an NCSS groupie. I’m unashamed of that. I have been since my first NCSS conference back in the mid eighties in St. Louis. I also have a passionate belief in giving back to the communities that have nourished me. And certainly NCSS is one of those communities for me. As much my community as the neighborhood I live in.

I have served in various roles already within the state and national council. First, I’ve been a presenter, both at state and national conferences. On the Illinois Council I was a board member at large, I was president, and now I am back to a board member at large, looking forward to our January meeting in Peoria. For NCSS, I’ve been a proposal reviewer. I’ve been on Conference Committee, including a, a stint as Conference Committee chair. I’ve been on the Local Arrangements Committees for the last two Chicago conferences, including co-chair of the last one. And I have always felt that those activities have given me at least as much as I’ve given them.

For the past seven years, I have also been part of the American Psychological TOPSS organization, which is Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools and on the task force for revising the high school psychology standards. I’m really proud to have used this opportunity as a means to promote partnerships between the American Psychological Association and the National Council for the Social Studies. I’m a great believer in alliances. I think that’s going to be very helpful to us in our advocacy role and in many other ways as well. And just in the, the time that APA and NCSS have become partners we’ve increased the number of psychology sessions and attendance by psychology teachers at NCSS. We’ve gained APA as an exhibitor at NCSS. The standards. Sorry.

Michael Yell, WI, President, National Council for the Social Studies:

Our first candidate for K-12 Teacher-at-Large is Terry Cherry.

Terry Cherry, TX, Candidate for K-12 Teacher-at-Large:

From inception to our last breath of life, in many ways our life’s based upon timing. The candidates the Board of Directors present today were chosen because we met someone, accomplished a task, or caught someone’s eye at the right time. The Board of Directors select the nominees who they feel would make a qualified future board member. This, I believe, is a wise process. Who better to know what qualities are needed to be a board member than a board member.

As a member of NCSS, I believe it is our time to begin to let people know what we are as an organization. The differences we make in classrooms, the changes we make in education, the students we mold into citizens. So how do we do this? How do we get our message to the public? What steps must we take to let our communities know the differences we are making and will continue to make in the educational process? NCSS must continue to lead in giving us tools to help us share our message in an effective manner, a process that we as members of NCSS can take to our local communities and spread our message.

The theme of this year’s conference is Dreams and Deeds. We all dream about when social studies will receive recognition equal to the other core subject areas. One way to do this is to let people know the deeds we have done and continue to do with students. Here’s where I believe NCSS can lead by giving us the materials we need and the steps to take to deliver our message and share our deeds with the nation. Knowing the correct way to approach a community group, leaders, and parents takes skill. It also depends on being there at the right time and place. NCSS, with the help of its members, you and I, can begin to make this happen. We can’t do it alone, but we can together.

As we know historical events do not happen at the snap of the fingers. Many activities and behind the scenes meetings take place before the actual event is completed. Making change is a process until the right time comes along and historical events is born. We are in that process with social studies. The time is now to let people know what we do, how we do it, and that we’re good at doing it. We are making a difference. We know it. Now is the time to share our message with the communities we live.

The candidates today before you have been selected for a reason. The decision to select which one should serve is now up to you. You have printed information, flattering photographs, and heard us speak today. The challenge is now to get to know us. Please talk to us in the next couple of days and get to know us up close and personal. After the election the task is still before us. The people in our local communities need to know the dreams and deeds of social studies. Timing is everything. Now is the time for us. I’m Terry Cherry. I have approved this speech.

Michael Yell, WI, President, National Council for the Social Studies:

Our second candidate for K-12 Teacher-at-Large is Marian Madison Jeroser who could not be with us.

At-Large candidate, first At-Large candidate is Melissa Callum.

Melissa Callum, WI, Candidate for At-Large:

You’ll have to trust me. I am behind the podium. My board says I’m small but I’m mighty. I’ve been a classroom teacher for advanced placement in regular high school social studies, a curriculum director, a classroom teacher, and administrator for gifted and talented students. I’ve taught in Kenya. And I’ve done curriculum evaluation in Rwanda. And I am currently a graduate student at Clemson University. Currently I serve on the chair of the NCSS Academic Freedom Community. And serving as the coordinator of the 2008 and 2009 WCSS conferences, it has enabled me to expand upon my talents I will use as a national Board member. In 2008 our keynote speaker was Greg Mortenson. And we raised over ten thousand dollars in an in-class fundraiser for Pennies for Peace. In 2009 NCSS’s convention, sorry, WCSS’s convention turned a profit of over twenty thousand dollars.

You can read my position statement. It’s before you. So I have some other words that I would like to say. There are four words, actually, I would like you to remember about my service to you as a delegate, a delegate to the NCSS Board. And those words are: listen, vision, voice and action. I will listen to your council. I will take heed of your concerns, comments and criticisms. And I will bring them to the NCSS Board. In turn, I will take note of the issues and concerns of the NCSS Board and bring them to you.

Vision: I am a reflection of your council’s goals and aspirations. Not only will I help you implement them on a council level, but with the foresight of a trained observer, I will bring your needs to the NCSS Board.

Voice: I will be the voice of your councils big and small, the NCSS Board and the voice of pre-service teachers, our largest underrepresented minority, the future of our councils and the future of NCSS. I will also be the voice of the NCSS ideal to governments at local, state and national level.

Action: I will bring the needs of all parties concerned, your council, your members, you, to the attention of the NCSS Board and ensure that they will all be put into action. My record in Wisconsin proves it. As a Board member, as a vice president and as a council president. So please remember those four words: Vision, listen, voice and action. I appreciate your vote.

Michael Yell, WI, President, National Council for the Social Studies:

Our second candidate for the At-Large position is Renee Scott. Renee could not be with us. So we will end up with our FASSE candidate, Fred Isley.

Fred Isley, IL, Candidate for FASSE:

I am standing behind the podium, so I hope you can see me. My name is Fred Isley. I’ve been with this organization for forty years. I’m sixty two, so this is my fortieth year as a professional educator. Fourteen years in the classroom, four years as a principal, twenty-five years in institutions of higher learning. And this morning I celebrated my two hundred and fiftieth professional presentation. And I found that out through my wife, Laura, who is active with her new computer. And she’s. I did not realize that. But anyway, as a, just a general background: Born and raised in a navy family surrounded by Swiss, German, Polish and Russian good people, family members. I went into the Jesuit Seminary and a miracle happened, I became an elementary teacher.

I, quite honestly, been part of this organization at multiple areas of opportunity, Board of Directors, chairs of multiple. I should say, I’ve been chair of the Steering Committee, Nominations and Elections Committee, Assessment Committee. I don’t know if you want to listen to this list. Resolutions Committee, been on the Board of Indiana Council for the Social Studies, Board of Illinois Council for the Social Studies, NCATE as a reviewer.

I guess as a FASSE member, I would have to say quite honestly, NCSS and all the affiliated groups of this organization are in very serious trouble with money. I talk with the state council representatives, go over and talk with Michigan in particular and our organization. The only thing I can say is that from my background I would want to point a couple of things out. One would be the fact that I would try to reaffirm what this, what is happening with the status quo with FASSE. Number two, work on the Internet. Also talk with all of you and the vendors with grant possibilities. I’ve been associated with two one million dollar grants that were quite successful in Indiana state and same area of the woods. And also just get into an extensive communications with each council with agendas. Essentially, I’d be trying to accurately represent all of you. And so I ask for your vote. Thank you.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you Michael, and the Nominations and Elections Committee for such a strong slate of candidates for the 2010 elections. It really bodes well for the future leadership of NCSS.

At this time we’re going to have the introduction of candidates for HOD committees. And you all, I’m going to ask the Steering Committee members if somebody could turn around the microphones so when they come up and introduce themselves, they’re not looking at us. They’re looking at you all. So you all can see that. If you are an HOD candidate, please come to the front and line up by committee at the appropriate microphones. I think on this side. I can’t see what signs Liz has. Liz has Steering and Assignment. So if you’re running for either of those two committees, if you could come to that microphone. And then line up behind Shelly if you’re running for Resolutions.

The introductions are going to be made by committee and we’re going to start with Steering. Then it’ll be Resolutions. And then it’ll be Assignments. And I’m going to give everybody just a second to get to their place before I give the candidates their instructions. So we’ll have Steering first, then Resolutions, and then Assignment.

Okay, if you’re a candidate, we want you to turn and face the House of Delegates and only state the full name and whom you are representing in the House of Delegates. For example, if I was running for a committee again this year, I would say, my name is Tara Sides and I’m affiliated with the South Carolina Council for the Social Studies. And that’s all I’m going to say because your qualifications are going to be handed out at the beginning of the second session tomorrow. So you’re just saying your name and who you’re affiliated with. And we’re going to start with Steering.

Gloria McElroy , TN, Candidate for Steering Committee:

Hi I’m Gloria McElroy from Tennessee Council for the Social Studies for Steering. Thank you.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Our second Steering candidate.

Maria Senilly, Candidate for Steering Committee:

Hello I’m Maria Senilly and I’m here representing the Middle States Council for the Social Studies.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Good job you all. Our next committee is Resolutions.

Lee Sullivan, AR, Candidate for Resolutions Committee:

Hello my name is Lee Sullivan and I’m here representing the Arkansas Council of the Social Studies.

Scott Miller, MN, Candidate for Resolutions Committee:

Hi I’m Scott Miller. And I’m here representing Minnesota Council for Social Studies.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Okay. And are we missing? Is that everybody from Resolutions? Okay. And our last committee is Assignment.

Susan Locklear, TX, Candidate for Assignment Committee:

Hi I’m Susan Locklear and I’m representing the Texas Council for the Social Studies.

Don Imler, PA, Candidate for Assignment Committee:

Hello, I’m Don Imler and I’m representing the Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

And you all, tomorrow morning you’ll be voting on these candidates at 8:20. So everybody please make sure that you’re here by 8:20.

Right now I’d like to turn the floor over to Susan Griffin, who is going to recognize our Gold and Silver Councils.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

When we were talking before, in the President’s report about services to pre-service teachers, we mentioned that we do have some pre-service councils already. One of them is here with us today from the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. We’d like to bring them up right now. And I want you to know in the book I wrote called Remembering America, which was written by going to forty-nine states with their WPA guides with the Wisconsin piece is on Stevens Point, an old Polish market town and a lumbering capital of Wisconsin. Very interesting.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

Good afternoon everyone. As you know, the Gold and Silver Stars are not that easy to accomplish, and we certainly appreciate all the hard work that goes into achieving this honor. And we are honored to have you doing this hard work. So we depend on the professionalism and the energy of our affiliate councils to make this organization work. So thank you all for being here.

I’d like to have our Silver Stars come up and get their Silver Star from Syd. New York State Council for the Social Studies. There will be an opportunity at the very end for picture taking. Next Silver Star is Ohio Council for the Social Studies. Someone in our own back yard in Silver Spring, Prince Georges County for the Social Studies, Silver Star. Congratulations. And we’re very pleased to have Southern Nevada Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations. And finally, Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies. You’ve been here before, haven’t you?

And now for the Gold Stars. I have to say that the first Gold Star, I think, is pretty impressive because it’s from the state council for the, that the NCSS President resides in, Arizona Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations. But however, we don’t, we don’t have your Silver, your Gold Star so you have to sit down. Oh we want a hug. So even better than a Gold Star, nice big hug from Syd. The Association of Teachers of the Social Studies/United Federation of Teachers. Congratulations, you’re Gold. These quite retiring types from New York. Now this is fun. These are the people that are going to host us next year, Colorado Council for the Social Studies. Oh, oh, Peggy is at it again. The moose is loose. Now doesn’t this make you excited about going to Colorado, huh? Oh, dear, dear, dear. Florida Council for the Social Studies. You are a Gold Star. And our fantabulous host, the Georgia Council for the Social Studies. Thank you so much, and congratulations. North Carolina Council for the Social Studies. You are Gold. Oregon Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations Oregon. Who’s that little person with the camera? And thank you so much to South Carolina Council for the Social Studies. That is one Gold delegation. And guess what? Texas Council for the Social Studies. Again you are a Gold council. Congratulations. Thank you for hard, all you hard work. No, no, we’ll do at the end.

Terry Tremble, could you please come up? I had a conversation with a, one of our council leaders who had gone to Terry Tremble’s session yesterday afternoon about finances. He called him a visionary.

Terry Trimble, FL:

I presume the person she’s talking about had been drinking a little bit at lunch time. The Fund for the Advancement of Social Studies Education was established in 1984 to promote innovative and dynamic social studies education. FASSE is very pleased this year to have given two McAuliffe grants for the first time. One, our standard McAuliffe grant. The second in recognition of Christine Allen for her years of service, and supported by the Oregon Council. And we appreciate all those who contributed and made that possible.

We were also pleased to institute this past year through the cooperation of the International Assembly. And I’d like to recognize Gloria Alter and Carolyn Omani, in particular, for their assistance in this process of a partnership with FASSE to introduce the International Understanding Grant. We hope to make that an every other year grant in the future. [inaudible] Looking forward, we had tremendously outstanding proposals that we think reflect the interest of National Council for the Social Studies and the International Assembly.

FASSE represents an investment in yourselves and it represents an investment in the future of social studies education, what we’re all about. We appreciate the Board of Directors making FASSE, finally after many years, a component structure in the budgeting process. We hope that we will be able to work with the Board of Directors in the future to explore additional resources and explore other sources of funds in order to help us achieve our goals.

We are pleased to announce that we have a short term goal has been achieved of one hundred thousand dollars. Our next goal is two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Ladies and gentlemen, if we are investing in ourselves, if we are investing in the future of social studies education, we can’t do it by car washes, we can’t do it by bakery sales, we can’t do it by basket auctions as we did in the past. We must be aggressive in our fundraising. We must be visionary. We must go out and promote social studies education, the benefits. And we must find a funding mechanism for this. And we have to count on you, the affiliates, to assist us in the process. Help promote, help join with National Council and move forward.

Two thousand five hundred dollar grants, five thousand dollar grants, ten thousand dollar grants are not going to insure the future of social studies education. We should be giving grants of one hundred thousand dollars minimum for research in social studies education. We should be doing it for the promotion of social studies education. And we should be doing it for the preservation of social studies education.

I hope you will join with FASSE, the FASSE Board and the National Council for the Social Studies in the fundraising effort. When Peggy Jackson says that when she dies, she’s going to have the Constitution in her purse. Hopefully a bequest to the FASSE Board will be in her purse at the same time. Thank you very much. Look forward to it.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

If you’ve got your program with you, would you please open to page twenty-three? Two years ago in San Diego we instituted first timer scholarships. This is the third conference at which we have enabled first timers to attend, especially those who do not have expenses for airfare and for hotel. So we are concentrating on the area around the conference on teachers who represent or teach underrepresented groups. And I just want you to notice that this year we have had state councils sponsor first timers. And I’d like to honor those councils who did it. It also counted in their Gold and Silver Star qualifications.

The very first one, my brothers and sisters of the Arizona Council for the Social Studies gave in my honor. And it was wonderful. The Association of Teachers of Social Studies/UFT. The Colorado Council for the Social Studies gave a scholarship in honor of Neil Beason. The Georgia Council for the Social Studies honored Gwen Hutchison. The Kentucky Council for the Social Studies gave a membership, a scholarship in honor of Janna Kirschner. The New Mexico Council for the Social Studies honored Maryann Danfelser. The North Carolina Council for the Social Studies honored Jean Haney. The Oregon Council for the Social Studies. The Tennessee Council for the Social Studies in honor of Dr. James Akinson, TCSS Executive Director. The Texas Council for the Social Studies and the Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies which gave a scholarship in honor of its executive board and members. This is wonderful. Let’s keep it up.

Now we have a few ending announcements. Reminder to delegates that our second session begins tomorrow at eight a.m. There will be no, there will be coffee service but no snacks. So leave time to get food before the meeting. Voting will take place tomorrow at eight twenty a.m. sharp. Clickers will be distributed to credentialed delegates up until this time. You must submit your green delegate certification card to receive a clicker. So don’t leave it in your room. Oh, says green here but it’s blue. Okay. Be sure to allow time to be credentialed prior to the beginning of the HOD session. Include exact criteria for voting for HOD committee members. Oh, I’m supposed to do that. See. The exact criteria, we discussed before. You do have to have your credentials and you have, in order to run for Steering, Resolutions and Assignment committees. And adjust your watch by my time. Bad idea. Not a good one. They don’t keep time on my hand. Who’s got the exact time up here? What? It’s five twenty-one so get here tomorrow by eight and we’ll vote at eight twenty and we will adjourn right now. Thank

Session Two

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

You all, we’d like to start promptly at eight o’clock. So you have about two minutes to be making your way to your seat. Promptly at eight o’clock.

Okay, if everybody could be making their way to their seat. Testing. Okay.

Okay, you all, we’re ready to start. Okay, so I’m going to turn it over to Syd.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Okay, I want to start by telling you, you were welcomed this morning by the Centennial High School Jazz Band from Fulton County here in Atlanta.

We have to remind all delegates, at this point, that you must submit your credentials. If you haven’t checked in at the proper place outside the hall, please do so now. Please silence or turn off your cell phones. We’re glad to see you back early in the morning and we surprised you by actually having breakfast. Didn’t know, but there it was. I hope you, you know, make sure that you get something to eat and something to drink.

Let’s start with the Pledge of Allegiance which will be led by Mickey Boyd, the President of the Georgia Council for the Social Studies.

Michael Boyd, GA, President, Georgia Council for the Social Studies:

We request that all people please stand and face the flag as we open with the Pledge of Allegiance. I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Thank you. It’s now my honor to welcome to the podium, the lifeblood lady of the National Council for the Social Studies, our wonderful Executive Director, Susan Griffin.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

Good morning everybody. I just want to give you a brief message about the state of National Council for the Social Studies, to let you know that we are doing well. We have had, as some other organizations [inaudible] as well as some state organizations, have had a dip in membership over the last few years. But one of the things that Syd mentioned yesterday, we have a very deliberate campaign going on that we hope will both build NCSS membership back to where it should be and beyond and also to build the membership in the state councils. So we’re going at it so that both of us will reap the benefit of this campaign.

I wanted to mention a couple of really fun things that happened in the past year. And we received two awards for our publications. Michael Simpson and his staff do a magnificent job. But in addition to that we are always have a few nominees for the Association for Education Publishing. And this year, we got two awards. One for our anniversary issue of Social Studies and the Young Learner. Very pleased about that and then we also had an article in the Research and Practice, and that was considered the best column.

We’ve been hearing from you for the last several years that we wanted to, thought we should have more professional development opportunities. So we listened to you and we had three summer workshops last year that all did very well. One was on Powerful and Authentic Social Studies Paths. And that was at Santa Clara. We will be doing that one again. We also had a program at the National Archives in Washington, DC. And that was on Teaching with Documents and Art. And we will offer that two times during this summer.

We had a wonderful experience at Yale last year. And Steven Armstrong, who many of you know, organized it. Mike Yell was one of the presenters. Syd Golston was up there. She just, she called me on her, from her cell phone and said, this is fantastic. So we’re hoping to do that again this year as well. And we’ll have a Linking Social Studies and Literature Strategies at Goucher College. So that will be in June.

We were also going to have an online course for the Powerful and Authentic Social Studies. And that should be available sometime in February.

The First Timer scholarships. We did so well and, in large degree because you all came up to the plate and bought scholarships, as some individuals did as well. And the NCSS staff donated a scholarship for a first timer in memory of Marcia Gerran, who is our beloved membership person who succumbed to breast cancer this past year.

We’ve been working very hard trying to figure out what’s going to happen with ESEA. And since our crystal ball is a little cloudy, what we do is we just keep having meetings with the right people, the right committees in Congress. We assure them that it would be a really good idea to have social studies back in the curriculum. And so as this unfolds, we’ll be asking you periodically, probably to contact your representatives, especially people who are on key committees. So if you are not linked into our legislative network, please make sure that somebody in your council is getting those messages.

We’re also paying very close attention to the effort by the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Governors Association to come up with some common core standards in social studies. The English and the Language Arts are finished. They haven’t been adopted yet, but they are done. The math has also been done. Next on board is science. And the happy disciplines of social studies are to be next. We’ve been working with the Chief State School Officers and offered them a plan. And we’re hoping that our offer of help will be gladly taken up. But in any case, just know that we are doing everything we can to make sure that National Council for the Social Studies is at the table. We would like to have consensus from the other disciplinary organizations: history, civics, economics. And we’re trying to make that happen. But it’s too soon for the victory party there.

So the other, I think, very exciting thing that we’re doing. We, we always work with our disciplinary organizations. But we’re now working with the science teachers, the math teachers and English teachers to come up with what we feel are principles of learning that cover all the discipline areas and also guide schools to be organized so that their students get a true twenty-first century education. So we are pulling together, [inaudible] not only a statement of what those principles are, which was adopted by our Board of Directors, but also to provide them with exemplars of what these principles look like in classrooms in math, science, social studies and English language arts. So we’re very pleased about that effort. We hope to have a meeting with Arne Duncan to present our wisdom. And we’re, I’ll let you know if that happens.

We have a very wonderful membership campaign that goes every year. And that was started by the Membership Committee under the leadership of Gayle Thieman. And that’s Each One Reach One. So everybody in this room should be recruiting people for National Council for the Social Studies. Your name will go into a couple of different drawings now. We used to have only one drawing for Each One Reach One recruiters. And they got two free tickets for some place in the continental United States. So we do have that one still. So each time you sign somebody’s membership application with your name as a sponsor. Each time you do that, your name goes into this drawing. So we have those wonderful people who’ve been recruiting and we want to acknowledge them now because we think this combination of continuing to have individuals reach out to their colleagues and encourage them to join National Council for the Social Studies as well as the brokering through our affiliate organizations are going to grow our numbers, which is the point of this. So thank you each person who has gone out and recruited somebody. We very much appreciate that. Thank you.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Hey good morning. Just real quickly, I’m just going to remind you that we’re using clickers for voting. You should have gotten one when you came in. You must be a certified voting delegate to receive a clicker. And they’re going to be activated as soon as Charles Vaughan gives his Credentials report, which will be in about five minutes. I see Charles walking around in the back. And then, if you leave at any time, if you have to leave the House of Delegates, you have to turn your clicker in, in the back. They’ll give you a sheet of paper, then you can get it when you come back in. But it’s just easier during the voting time, once the doors are closed if you would not leave. Right now I’m going to turn it over to Dustin Frank, who is with eInstruction. Those of you that have been in the House of Delegates for a few years know that this is Dustin’s third year with us with using clickers. So I’m going to let him explain the process to you.

Dustin Frank, eInstruction:

Thank you Tara. I am Dustin Frank. We also have Ed Barnes with us in the back of the room. He’ll be our assisting there as we go through the voting process. And we want to thank NCSS. It’s turned out to be a wonderful relationship that started all the way back in Kansas City, if any of you were there. One of the reps came by and said we would love to work with you and ever since then we’ve kind of tweaked and twisted the voting process a little bit to kind of hopefully help out.

So, basically, I’m going to give you just a quick run down of who E-Instruction is. Hopefully you’ll stop by our booth, it’s out there, booth number six thirteen. Hopefully you’ve see we’ve invested a little bit in NCSS. We have, I think, the biggest booth out there, so we’ve got a big giant area. Which is good, lots of people coming by, but. We do have the world’s largest provider of, of response pads. We have about five million, which is more than all the rest of the competitors combined. We do offer a total solution. We have interactive white boards. We have tablets. We have several types of clickers. So, we’d appreciate you guys coming by and checking out, out what’s going on in our booth.

But to kind of help with the process here. I wanted to walk you through how to use your clicker. So. At the very, very bottom of the clicker you should see a power button. If you turn that power button on, actually any button will turn it on. But there is a power button at the bottom. So if you press that button, you should see on screen right up there in the top left your remote number. That’s who you are according to my computer. I just put in generic student one, student six, student one hundred and eighty-four, whoever that is. You’ll also see there’s a remote number on the top of your clicker that should match. If you’re number six or number nine, ask your neighbor which one you are. They may not be sure. The answer keys are there in the center. Okay, you’ll use those keys to make your selection. And the way the voting process will work is, once you’ve selected your choice, it will appear on the screen. You will see your answer. If you decide for some reason you need to change your mind, or you have fat fingers like me and you push the wrong button, then you can do a clear. That will take your answer off and you can change your answer. And in order to submit your vote you must press the send button. When you do that on screen your box number, which you will see in just a moment, will light up dark blue. Okay? People in the back, it has about a three hundred foot radius. So it may take you a second or two to fly up here to my computer. But we tested them all around the room before we started. And we’re going to do a little practice run so you can see it. So.

Here’s how the first one’s going to work. It says from the original Justice League, please select your favorite super hero. So notice across there, there is A-G. These are the original members. So I know there were some extras added, but these are the originals. So I’m going to come down here and I’m going to turn on the first question. When I turn on this question here you should see remotes across the bottom. And I’ll blow it up like that so you can see it a little bit larger. If we need it even larger I can make it larger as well. If your box does not light up dark blue, that means either you haven’t pressed send or it’s still floating to my computer up here. Okay. If you have any issues with your clicker, please stand up. We do have representatives in the back that they can adjust your clicker or get you a new one. The way these little devices work is they are programmed to a specific radio frequency channel and as of one thirty-eight this morning, they were all on the same channel, promise. I tested them this morning. Okay.

When we do the voting process you will have a minute to vote and we can extend that vote if necessary. So we’ll stop this. In the normal process of the committee voting, okay you will not see who the, the winner is. What we will do is we will look privately because we won’t display that information on the committee voting. We will display the information on the resolution voting. But right here you can see that Batman won the first vote. He was the favorite. So now on the committee voting you will now make your second vote for the second member. Okay? If you see a box flashing red like that, all that means is that you were pushing buttons before I asked you the question. So it’s kind of an indicator to the teacher that someone’s kind of goofing around or something like that. This is how we’ll be doing the committee voting today. Okay?

When we do the resolution voting we will be able to display the information. Here’s how this one works. It says that if Popeye were to run for President, how would you vote? You have three choices. You have A as for, B as against or C as abstain. In this process we will show the results immediately. That way you’ll know if the resolution passes or fails as soon as we vote. Again, if you have any difficulties, please stand. We do have reps that can check your remote for you. This is the type of information you’ll see. So it looks like our second one there was Popeye would be President if he was elected [inaudible] there.

We will also do the House of Delegates evaluation at the end. Okay, this will be a very similar process. You will do that at your own pace. The way this one will works is I will initiate that towards the end of the conference. You may notice your clicker doing some things off to the side. If you’re staring at the screen. It’ll be, I’ll be working with it up here. What I will do is set up the evaluation. Whatever, as you’re leaving the room, you simply take your clicker and say number one, send, number two, send. You can walk through those at your own pace. You don’t have to wait for each other. If you pay attention to your LCD panel, it will say on screen. This is the question that you’re on. You do have to submit your answer there. If you do change your mind and want to give someone an A instead of a C or something, just like before you can use the arrow keys, you can clear answers out and send them. But if you look on screen, it’s pretty clear, it say’s question six, or question one, or question ten, whichever one you’re, you’re indicating on the evaluation at the end. Okay? All right. Thank you.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Okay, thank you Dustin. At this time I’d like to introduce Charles Vaughan from South Carolina who is the Credentials Committee chair who is going to tell us how many registered delegates we have in this session.

Charles Vaughan, SC, Chair, Credentials Committee:

Good morning, as chair of the Credentials Committee, I am pleased to report that a hundred and sixty-six delegates are registered and certified to vote in the House of Delegates as of 8:20 today, Saturday, November 14th, 2009. On behalf of the Credentials Committee, I move adoption of the Credentials report.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

The motion is on adoption of the Credentials report as just read. Those in favor, please say aye. Opposed, say no. The ayes have it. The Credentials report is adopted.

At this time I’m just going to review once again the elections process. The clickers have been activated for your use. There are no additional clickers are going to be issued at this point because the voting process is about ready to begin. You’re going to have one minute to cast your vote. There is a clock on the screen. If we see that there’s problems, then we will extend the voting time. But this was one of the things that was made, suggestions made from evaluations last year, was to just limit the voting to one minute.

After we finish committee elections the doors will reopen and people can leave and come back in because we’ll be voting and discussing on resolutions.

Elections for HOD committees are going to occur by committee. You’ve, you were formerly introduced to the committee member, to the people running for committees in the first session. This morning you received a handout, I think it is light blue, about their qualifications, to help guide you with making your selections. The ballots are going to be projected on the screen. And candidates if you will please stand when your name is read. And voting is going to be conducted for the committees after the presentation of the ballot.

We’re going to elect two candidates for Steering, Resolutions and Assignments. We’re going to have the results tabulated immediately and selection is going to be displayed by committee. At this time we’ll begin the election process for the House of Delegates committees. We’re going to start with the Steering Committee, and you all let me just explain this. We’ve got two Steering and Resolutions that we’re electing two members. There is only two members running for it. So we’re going to elect them by an acclimation vote. So and I’ll take you all through that process. If you want to look in the House of Delegates Manual on page twenty-five and it talks about this process with acclimation.

So we are starting with Steering. If Gloria McElroy and Maria Senilly, if they’ll both stand. Since there are no contested positions, the, I need, I need a motion from the floor to elect them by acclimation. Okay, a second? All those in favor please say aye. Opposed? Okay congratulations to Gloria and Maria. Welcome to the Steering Committee.

Okay. Our next is going to be Resolutions, Resolutions. Okay. If Steve Hench, Scott Miller [inaudible Noet] and Lee Sullivan will all please stand so you all can see them. Everybody see them. And you have their qualifications in front of you. Okay. And you all can have a seat now. I won’t make you stand through the whole voting.

And you all what we’re going to do with this is you can only vote for one candidate. So we’re going to vote. You’re going to have your slate with the three candidates. You’re going to vote for your first choice. Then we’re going to remove the one with the highest votes and then you’re going to vote for your second choice. Does that make sense? So there’ll be two rounds of voting. Okay. Are we ready? Okay, so if you will make your first selection. And you have one minute. Please stand if you have a problem with your clicker. Okay on the first round Scott Miller [inaudible Noet] was elected to the Resolutions Committee. Congratulations Scott.

Now we need to vote between Steve Hench and Lee Sullivan. And we’re about to get the second ballot up on the screen, okay. So if you will go ahead and cast your vote for your second choice for Resolutions. Okay and congratulations to Lee Sullivan who was just elected to the Resolutions Committee.

Okay, and our third committee is Assignment. I think I’m getting ahead of my tech people. And just like Steering, there are only two people who have been nominated to serve on the Assignment Committee. So once again we will elect them by acclimation. If I could have a motion, okay. And a second? Thank you. So all those in favor of accepting the slate as presented to you, please say aye. Opposed? Okay, hearing no opposition, Donald Imler and Susan Locklear have been elected to the Assignment Committee.

And as a reminder, if you were just elected to a committee, the new committees will meet at the front at the end of this session. So make sure you meet with your committee at that time.

Okay, I am going to turn the floor over to Syd and she is going to lead you through the first vote on the NCSS amendment.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

We are going to vote for an amendment of the Constitution. Voting choices are for, against and abstain. And the proposed amendment to the NCSS Constitution will be read and then we have ten minutes for debate. If you would like to speak in favor or against the amendment, please go to the microphones. The Steering Committee members will hold signs denoting whether you are speaking for or against. Discussion is limited to two minutes per speaker and ten minutes overall.

The amendment reads as follows: The President-Elect and the Vice-President shall assume such duties as the President or Board of Directors shall specify. In case of a vacancy in any officer position, the NCSS Executive Committee shall nominate an interim officer to fill the remainder of the vacant term. That nomination must be approved by the entire Board of Directors. If the interim appointment is a currently serving officer, e.g. the Vice-President becoming President-Elect, the remaining vacant office shall be filled in the same manner.

Now if we have discussion for or against, let’s begin.

Jeff Passe, College and University Faculty Assembly:

My name is Jeff Passe from College and University Faculty Assembly. I’m speaking in favor of the amendment. There was a question yesterday. I just thought I’d give a little bit of background. Even though it seems very convenient to have the Vice-President replace the President-Elect and the President-Elect to replace the President. It doesn’t really make sense in a practical manner because people have made arrangements well in advance for time off from their job responsibilities. And really someone who is planning a conference, for instance, as Vice-President can’t easily just move into somebody else’s conference and start planning it. So it makes, not that we’re ruling it out. But it makes more sense to give the Executive Committee the opportunity to research and nominate the person that would best fulfill those duties.

And the question yesterday about the reference to the entire Board, that’s, “the entire Board of Directors” doesn’t mean unanimous, it means as different from the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors. The Executive Committee has six members or seven members and the entire Board has many more. So just some explanation.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Do we have any other speakers for or against the amendment?

Eugene Ersom, OK:

Eugene Ersom from the Oklahoma Council. I would move to amend this by simply striking the word “entire” so as to clarify and remove any doubt about whether it needs to be a unanimous vote or not.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

We would need now to have a second first and then discussion on the amendment only. Is everybody clear where Gene Ersom has indicated he’d like the amendment to read? Instead of by “the entire Board of Directors” just “by the Board of Directors.” Do we have discussion on the amendment? Yes we do.

Jeff Passe, College and University Faculty Assembly:

Jeff Passe, College and University Faculty. Sorry to be up here again but. I, I know it’s very well meaning to make that amendment, but we’ve already started the process. It’s been approved by the Board of Directors, it was approved by this group a couple of years ago. So if you were to amend it we have to start all over again. And it’s well understood what it all means. I’m speaking against the amendment.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Any other discussion on the amendment only? Yes.

Bill O’Sick, VA:

My name is Bill O’Sick. I’m a first timer from Virginia. Virginia Council of Social Studies. I would just like to ask a question on this if possible. If you amend this, it says just the Board of Directors, how many votes are you going to need then to have an executive officer replace a vacancy? Or if you do the entire Board of Directors, do you need all six votes then or the majority of votes to have this vacancy filled? I’m just asking this question from the standpoint that how do you go about, you know, filling this vacancy? Do you need a two-thirds majority or something? If you’re going to amendment, amend it to say without the entire Board of Directors, then you’re, I think you’re a little, you got a little leeway there. And if you had the entire Board of Directors then you still have, you know, the semantics of maybe all six votes, or you need. You know, I think you need to look at do you need just a two-thirds majority of the Board of Directors or do you need half of the Board of Directors something like that case.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

First of all our parliamentarian’s told us the amendment itself right now would need just a majority vote. When we vote, I mean the amendment to the amendment. When we vote on the amendment to the Constitution we must pass by two-thirds. Now as far as how the Board of Directors would vote for a placement, I think that’s a majority.

Bill O’Sick, VA:

Okay, then I would, I’m against taking off “entire.” I would amend it to say “majority” then.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

That is not in order because we haven’t voted on the first. We have an amendment on the floor that we have to vote on first.

Eugene Ersom, OK:

Eugene Ersom with the Oklahoma Council. With all due respect to Jeff, I understand what he’s attempting to say but I don’t think it is clear if you simply say “that nomination must be approved by the entire Board of Directors.” My interpretation of that would be a unanimous vote, the entire Board of Directors. It doesn’t say majority. It doesn’t say two-thirds. And again I would defer to our parliamentarian, but I think if it doesn’t say by a particular margin, then it would be a simple majority. I think that’s what Robert’s would say unless our rules say anything to the contrary. Putting the word entire in there though, I think, raises the issue of whether or not it does require a unanimous vote on the part of the Board of Directors to do so. Therefore I would pursue this even if it does require this to go back to the Board of Directors. I’d rather we did it right the first time than have to go back and change it later.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Our parliamentarian agrees that we need a first vote to take place right now and then all of these other issues can be raised. Do we have any further discussion on Gene’s amendment? Hearing none, I’m going to call for a vote. All those in favor of amending our amendment to the Constitution by striking the word “entire” please say aye. All those opposed? We need to use the, the clickers. We didn’t, the parliamentarian, Miss Coffer has told us she didn’t hear it clearly and neither did I so.

Okay, we are going to put up. Oh, we can do it. No we can’t do it. No, no. Okay, but you do need to use your clickers now. Okay, A on your clicker means yes. B on your clicker means no. We are voting on the amendment to the amendment. If you wish to strike. This, this requires a majority. If you wish to strike the word “entire” please vote A. If you do not wish to strike the word “entire” please vote B. Okay. We have one more clicker to register. The amendment has passed.

Okay, okay so, the new version of the amendment is the same as the old one with the exception of the striking of the word “entire.” So the amendment as written. Did we take the word “entire” off? Okay. Will be on the screen for you to look at and then we will have debate on the amendment as it was amended. Okay. So to read it over. Over here. The change that has been noted is: In case of a vacancy in any officer position, the NCSS Executive Committee shall nominate an interim officer to fill the remainder of the vacant term. That nomination must be approved by the Board of Directors. If the interim appointment is a currently serving officer, e.g. the Vice-President becoming President-Elect, the remaining vacant office shall be filled in the same manner.

Debate is open on the amended amendment.

Dorsee Johnson-Tucker, CO:

Dorsee Johnson-Tucker from Colorado. Having been on the Board of Directors at the time that this whole discussion started, I have a very specific question. And Susan I don’t know if you’re the one that’ll have the answer. Now that we have amended something that has already been approved by the NCSS Board of Directors and approved by House of Delegates a year ago so that this could be voted on to go to the ballot this February, does it have to go all the way back to step one to the Board of Directors?

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

It does not, according to the Executive Director.

Dorsee Johnson-Tucker, CO:

Okay, so we can vote for this to go on the ballot for this year.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Yes. Yes.

Dorsee Johnson-Tucker, CO:

Thank you.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Ray.

Ray Wicks, MO:

Ray Wicks, Missouri Council for the Social Studies. I am concerned about the amendment in general but also an issue of clarification. Concerned that we would have an officer, if this is the only thing we change, who has never stood for election, conceivably, not very likely, but conceivably all of the officers could be appointed in this manner by the Board. Again that’s not very likely.

My, my concern about clarification is the meaning of remaining, of the time remaining in the vacant office since there is a succession process. Is that the end of the year of that particular office, such as Vice-President or President-Elect? Or does it mean because of the succession that that person would stay on in the successive positions?

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

We’re going to ask you some questions. Your question is if the Board of Directors votes in somebody, first of all, who’s never held, held any office in the organization other than just membership. That’s a concern?

Ray Wicks, MO:

I have a concern that we would have somebody in a position who’s never stood for office, never been presented to the membership.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

And the second concern that you have is if that appointment is made, let’s say the Vice-President is incapacitated. Does the person who is appointed become the President-Elect and then the President?

Ray Wicks, MO:

Is the remaining time in that vacant office the remaining time for the position of Vice-President or is it through Past-President?

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

It’s just the one year of the term.

Ray Wicks, MO:

I believe it needs clarification.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

So if the Vice-President were incapacitated. Or Sue we’re doing terrible things to your life. Then that, at the end of that officer year, there would be an election for another President-Elect. Anybody else?

Mike Horn, WI:

Mike Horn, Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies and Board of Directors. I believe that there is a requirement that a person to serve as an officer must have completed a term on the Board of Directors. And I would assume that would be guidance to the Executive Committee and Board in making the appointment.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

That’s right. This, this amendment does not abrogate the original Policy Manual requirement that in order to run for an officer position in NCSS, you have to have served one term or more on the Board of Directors. So you would have been elected at some point.

Other discussion? Okay. Are we ready to vote. Once again, if you vote A you are voting yes on the amended amendment. If you vote press B you are voting no. And this time there is a C for abstention. Please go ahead and vote. The amendment has passed.

I’d like to turn it back over to Tara Sides.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Okay, at this time I just want to remind you if you are new to the House of Delegates this morning and you weren’t in the session yesterday, does anybody need a copy of the resolutions that we’re going to be considering? If you’ll just raise your hand if you need a copy of the resolutions. We will get them to you. Kristen’s coming around. I just see a couple of people. So if you all will give her a second. But those are the resolutions that we’re going to be considering today.

At this time I’d like to introduce the chair of the Resolutions Committee, Terry Cherry. And President Golston and Terry will be leading you through the resolutions process. And I just want to remind you, if you are following the resolutions process, that you can look in the HOD Manual on pages twenty-six through twenty-seven, which once again, explains this process that we’re going through. And if you are going to make an amendment to a resolution and it’s going to be long, please do us a favor and write it out for us and bring it up to Anton up here. That way we can have a written copy rather than just introducing it on the floor. So we’ll have a written copy of it. Okay, and now I’m going to turn it over to Terry and Syd.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

This is Terry Cherry, the chair of the House Resolutions Committee.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

The way we’ll do this is I will read the title of the resolution and then I will read the BE IT RESOLVED and then we’ll have discussion and the voting.

This is Resolution 09-01-1: NCSS To Encourage and Support Summer Leadership Institute.

BE IT RESOLVED NCSS should reinstitute the Summer Leadership Institute utilizing an optimal time commitment, capitalizing on technology and face to face networking including the direct lobbying of our elected officials.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Before we begin debate on the resolution and all of them, I’d like to read a reminder from our parliamentarian, Miss Cofer, before we begin discussing. Can a member make a friendly amendment to a resolution, is the question. The short answer is, if you make what you may call a friendly amendment, we’ll handle it as a formal amendment. All amendments are treated the same way. So be sure to have your exact wording ready. Because that’s what you do with a formal amendment.

Your motion to amend will require a second and the floor will then be opened to debate on only the amendment just as we just did for the Constitutional amendment. It will be voted on by voice vote or by raising hands. And only if we feel we have to make a division will we use the clickers. A majority vote is required to pass the amendment. And then we’ll go back if it is passed to the resolution. Any other questions [inaudible]? Okay. Let’s have debate on this first resolution about Summer Leadership.

Eugene Ersom, OK:

Eugene Ersom with the Oklahoma Council. Mine is really more a point of information than anything else. I know having been the beneficiary of participating in Summer Leadership for at least three summers, I know of the value of that experience. But I’m curious to know how much NCSS generally invests in the Summer Leadership Institute and how much we quote saved end quote by not conducting it this past summer.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

Since that’s Ana Post’s budget I don’t have the exact number in my brain, so I’m asking Ana what that number is.

Ana Post, NCSS Director of External Relations and Council Communication:

Let me see if I can recall correctly. The total cost, if I recall, is thirty thousand, about thirty thousand dollars. I believe that by having Thursday’s program instead, which is not the plan forever, we saved around, I would say in the order of fifty [inaudible: fifteen] thousand dollars. So a little bit more than that probably. I, I can.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

I think that’s about right Anna, because when you consider the stipends and then the food, etc. So I think that, that sounds like a very accurate number.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Thank you.

Steve Armstrong, CT:

Steve Armstrong, Connecticut Council. As many in the room would be able to do, speaking to the benefits of Summer Leadership. But the simple question is can, at this point with membership in a bit of a drop, can, can we afford to do it? That’s the question to be answered.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

We will know pretty clearly after this conference and all of the onsite registration is processed back at the office where we are financially. Because after the conference we are half way through our fiscal year. And our two big revenue streams are the annual conference and membership. So a clear picture after the, after this conference will appear and we’ll be able to make a, an informed decision. I think everybody agrees that the Summer Leadership Institute is a huge benefit, both for NCSS and for the participating councils. But if we can’t afford it, we can’t afford it.

Don Imler, PA:

Don Imler, Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies. I’d like to just talk about Thursday a little bit. I mean I thought Thursday was great. And it was a great opportunity for us. You know, I’m one of those guys that have a pretty committed summer as it is. And though I think that the Leadership Program must be phenomenal, I would think that our leadership is aware that both of these things have value and will continue to do those which make the most sense at the most time. And maybe in some years move forward with both.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

The other thing that Syd mentioned is that we certainly encourage, in addition to visiting in Washington, DC your representatives offices, we want to impress upon you the importance of doing it in their home offices as well. That’s a very effective way to have your voice heard.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

More, more debate on?

Ron Adams, NH:

Yes, I’m Ron Adams from the New Hampshire Council for the Social Studies. I’m speaking for the resolution. I don’t need to say about the benefits, I think, but one, the sharing between states that happens at Leadership that really can’t happen or doesn’t happen that much at this conference simply because of all of the various commitments. Also, I think in the past that resolutions written at the summer conference had been polished and in a appropriate form. It also gives us a chance to take those resolutions back to our state councils to get some feedback. As it is now there’s no way it will be just the people here in Washington voting on the resolutions with virtually no feedback from their states membership. And whereas before in the summer most of the resolutions were finished and we had time to take them back and debate them in our own state councils. Thank you.

Tracy Dussia, VA:

Tracy Dussia from the Virginia Council. This is just a point of information. It seems like this is a very well turned out conference. Do you have registration estimates on how high or low our turn out is this time. So that we can just gauge compared [inaudible].

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

We do not yet. It is successful but the degree of success, we don’t know.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

We came in with thirty-two hundred people. And that is, we budgeted for thirty-two hundred people total. So the onsite registration is really what’s going to make or break us. We did have a significant shortfall in the exhibit area. So it would have to make up for that shortfall in order for us to be flush.

Janna Bremer, MA:

Janna Bremer, Massachusetts Council. While I agree wholeheartedly with my esteemed colleague from New Hampshire, Ron Adams, I feel that, that we should not tie the hands of NCSS. I truly believe, as Susan said that, that they believe wholeheartedly in the Summer Leadership conference and they will do everything in their power to make sure that it happens. But I don’t want to tie their hands and force them into something like that. I assume we really couldn’t force you. But in the event that it provides great trauma. Exactly. So I, I say let’s vote against it. Thank you.

Bill Harris, OH:

Bill Harris from the Ohio Council. We’re the ones who submitted this. And our intent was not to force the hand of the, of NCSS but to express from, at least from the House of Delegates that we as a group want to continue the Summer Institute. And if it’s possible, that’s what we would want. If it’s not financially possible, we also understand that. But I think as a group if we say that this is something that we want, then we’re telling the Board of Directors this is something that we, that the membership wants. That’s the intent of this resolution.

Peggy Altoff, CO:

Hi. Peggy Altoff and I support what Janna said and I urge you to vote against this, not because it’s bad. We all want Summer Leadership. But I guess I was looking at the positive side and the things that happened as a result of the fact that Summer Leadership was cancelled. It made NCSS more innovative. There were two web conferences if you will. There was the, the session here, which was very new and from what I understand, very successful, though I had a very small part in it. I don’t know. I guess I am looking at the positive side and saying almost by voting against this we’re encouraging more innovation and looking at more ways of keeping us all connected and keeping the advocacy piece strong.

I’m also looking ahead at our next sessions, our next conferences and perhaps one of those things we can consider is whatever state we’re in that we go to that state house. And then in two years we’re in Washington. And that all of the leaders can come in on Thursday and make a visit to the Hill so that when we don’t get the opportunity to make those very important visits in the summer time that we can look for other ways to contact our people and to look forward to the future and doing it in different ways. Thank you.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Thank you Peggy. The amount of time that we can debate any resolution is limited to ten minutes unless we vote to extend the time of debate. We just have a few moments left.

Rosella Kirchgaessner, NY:

I’ll only take a couple of seconds. Rosella Kirshkesner, ATSS/UFT, New York City, New York State. I thank the Ohio Council very much for raising this resolution because I think it goes to the point of us speaking to the value of it. I encourage us to vote against the resolution because I think that it does tie the hands in a way. By making this official, it, it, it indicates that we really need to. We agree, I agree we need it. I just think we need to vote against the amendment cause I don’t think we need to make it that formal.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Okay. Unless we have an amendment to extend debate this is going to be the end of debate on this resolution number 09-01-01. I’d like to call for a vote now. If you press A on your clicker you’re voting yes on this amendment. If you press B you are voting no. If you press C you are abstaining.

Dustin is going to show you one of the capabilities of these clickers which is, you could use with students, you can show the number and the percentage of each selection.

Forty-five percent in favor. Fifty-three percent against. And the motion has failed.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

I would like to remind you also that based on the information received from HOD last year, we have done resolutions green-wise as possible. We put the resolutions on both side paper and we have not made one resolutions per page. We’ve just made them continuation. And that was your suggestions.

Resolution 09-01-02: NCSS Webinars

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS will continue to use this process with a goal of at least four times a year or as needed.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Our parliamentarian has suggested that we make an editorial change on the resolution so that the word “this” actually includes “use this webinar process.” Oh, “this NCSS webinars process.” It’s just a, clarifies, okay. Anybody opposed to doing that? So now the resolution will read:

that NCSS will continue to use this NCSS webinar process with a goal of at least four times a year or as needed.

Is there discussion on the amendment? I mean on the resolution?

Peggy Jackson, NM:

Peggy Jackson, New Mexico. This resolution was written during the webinar itself, July 30th. It was the consensus of those on the webinar that we wanted to make a goal, not to tie NCSS into having to do this, but that we wanted to be able to use this process to communicate. It worked well. It was successful and I think we should pass it.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Any other discussion?

Ray Wicks, MO:

Ray Wicks, Missouri Council. I also speak in favor of, of the resolution. I would have wished that it had a little bit more specificity as to the purposes of the webinar and would suggest that this would be an excellent way to have the President and Executive Director on a regular basis communicate with state affiliates and local affiliates on issues that we’re dealing with, such as some of those that, that Susan mentioned.

I participate in a, a monthly webinar with our state education agency. And I find that very effective. It’s an hour long session. Topics are identified ahead of time. Questions are able to be submitted online and answered in real time. And I think this is the kind of technology that we need to consider. And especially in a time of a decline in membership, the National Council can only do so much in making that gap between the national members and the state members grow smaller. It really is the local affiliates and the state affiliates that can impact that membership significantly and to communicate with those folks. So I, I strongly support this concept and would suggest that the issues that we’re dealing with, be topics of those first few seminars. Thank you.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Thanks. Nan.

Nan Jones, SC:

Nan Jones, South Carolina Council for Social Studies, Board of Directors. While the webinar is a great experience, if you’ve never done it, it’s really a learning thing. The concern I have is technology changes faster than we even can blink an eye. Will that be used, can we find something better next year? I hate to tie our hands with something that will be obsolete in another year or two.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Additional discussion? Okay.

Marjorie Hunter, AR:

Marjorie Hunter from the Arkansas Council. I just have a question or point of clarification. It says, goal of at least four times a year or as needed. How do we determine as needed?

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

I would think it would be by the Board of Directors, you know, or the office of NCSS deciding that something needed to be done as a webinar.

Seeing no further discussion, I’d like to call for a vote on Resolution 09-01-02. A for, B against, C abstain. Okay. The resolution has passed seventy-seven percent to twenty-two percent. And you see the numbers are right next to it.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Resolution 09-01-03: Census 2010

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS devote an issue of Social Education on the importance of the census, including lesson plans and it be further

BE IT RESOLVED, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that NCSS maintain a resource list of and links to partnership with the Census Bureau in each state or school districts and teachers post these lists and links on the NCSS website.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT, New York City. I’d like to make a friendly amendment to the first RESOLVE. I need a second on this. I was the original writer of this motion.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Okay, remember that all amendments are the same.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Okay.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

But you’d just like to amend it how?

Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT, New York City, New York State

I’d like to add education for young leader to also be included because I know the articles are in preparation [inaudible].

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Where in the?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

First RESOLVED, issue of Social Education and education for the young leader, young learner, yeah, young learner.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

We want to know exactly where in this amendment, in this resolution?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

[inaudible] That NCSS devote an issue of Social Education and the education of the young learner, social studies for the young learner.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Oh, you just want to add the other journal?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Yeah, cause I know the articles are in preparation.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Okay. Be it resolved that NCSS devote an issue of Social Education and an issue of Social Studies and the Young Learner on the importance of the census. Is that what?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Yes.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Okay. We’re going to need a half of, fifty-one percent vote in favor of the amendment. Is there discussion the amendment?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

May I speak to it?

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Sure.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Okay. I was speaking to the Census Bureau people in the exhibit area. And they told me they were already preparing this material. There’s nothing wrong in having a resolution that includes something that’s in preparation. But I think we should add it since we know it’s in preparation.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Further discussion of the amendment to the resolution?

Rob Dill, SC:

I’m Rob Dill with South Carolina Council for the Social Studies. I just wanted to amend the amendment I guess.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

No, you can’t do that now.

Rob Dill, SC:

[inaudible]. That’s right.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Oh, wait a minute. You can if it is to amend what we’ve just added. If you, if you want to talk about.

Rob Dill, SC:

I want, I did want.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

The addition of the word “and the Young Learner.”

Rob Dill, SC:

Right. Because there.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

“And Social Studies and the Young Learner.”

Rob Dill, SC:

Because I’m a middle school teacher and why should we not add then the middle level. So maybe we need to change it to, to, you know, NCSS devote.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

It would be a separate amendment.

Rob Dill, SC:

Issues of their publications in general.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Okay. It would be a separate amendment. We have to vote on this amendment and then we could see whether we want to include the other, other one. Any further discussion? Okay. Let’s voice vote on the amendment to add “Social Studies and the Young Learner” to the resolution. All in favor, aye? All opposed? Okay I think we are going to add “Social Studies and the Young Learner” as an amendment.

Now we have to go back to the amended resolution which now reads:

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS devote an issue of Social Education and Social Studies and the Young Learner on the importance of the census, including lesson plans and be it further resolved, etc. etc.

Discussion is open on the amended resolution.

Rob Dill, SC:

Okay, now I would say to amend it to add the Middle Level Learner also in that. Because am I correct in saying that?

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Yes.

Rob Dill, SC:

Even though I have, I have a comprehensive membership where I get all of the documents. Some people only get certain ones of those? Is that correct?

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

You have to give us the specific wording. Do we put a comma after Social Studies and the Young Learner and add Middle Level Learning?

Rob Dill, SC:

Yeah.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Is that what you want?

Rob Dill, SC:

That’s, that’s what I would say.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Okay. The suggested amendment to the resolution is that we now list Social Education, Social Studies and the Young Learner, and Middle Level Learning. Discussion on that amendment.

Male speaker:

I have a, [inaudible] Council for the Social Studies. I just have a question on this. We have issues of Social Education, the magazine and the young learner. Do we have an issue that has middle learning?

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Yes, we have.

Male speaker:

Okay. Because I have never seen one.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

It comes with Social Education. It’s bundled with Social Education.

Male speaker:

Okay, thank you.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

More discussion? Okay let’s vote on the resolution, the amendment to the resolution, excuse me, to include Middle Level Learning. We are resetting the clickers. Oh, we should do a voice vote. If you are in favor of adding “Middle Level Learning” please say aye. Opposed? Okay, so we have amended twice this resolution so that it now reads:

NCSS devote an issue of Social Education, Social Studies and the Young Learner, and Middle Level Learning on the importance of the census.

Now discussion of the motion.

Melissa Callum, WI:

Melissa Callum, Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies. I would like to propose an amendment. The last line where it reads: for school districts and teachers. Grammatically it should read “for school districts and teachers and to post these lists and links.”

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

That we don’t need an amendment for. We can just make that another editorial change.

Melissa Callum, WI:

We can just editorially change it please?

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Okay, so you’d, what you’d like to do is have it read:

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that NCSS maintain a resource list of and links to partnerships with the Census Bureau in each state for school districts and teachers to post these lists.

Melissa Callum, WI:

And to.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

And to post. I got it. And to post these lists and links on the NCSS website.

Melissa Callum, WI:

Thank you.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

All right. Okay. That, anybody object to that. I don’t think so. Discussion on the amendment, on the resolution?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Carolyn Herbst again. I’m proposing an editorial change that might make this just a little clearer on the second resolve. The official title of the people that work with the Census Bureau that form partnerships is called Partnership Specialists. So I’m thinking maybe we should change the second RESOLVE, “that NCSS maintain a resource list and links to Partnership Specialists in the Census Bureau” and that would give better guidance to NCSS on what to look for in posts.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

This is not an amendment right, just editorial?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

No it’s an editorial change. That’s what I meant by partnerships. Yeah, Partnership Specialists. It’s the title and I found one by working through the Alliance for Retired Americans. I’m on the newsletter editor of the New York City Chapter of that. And we had a Partnership Specialist speak so I, that’s the title that they were using.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

So Partnership Specialist, that’s the correct title?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Yes, that’s the official title, yes. What?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We’ll take that.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Partnership Specialist. So take off the “s” for partnership and change it to specialist. Yeah.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Specialists, specialist is plural?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Specialists, yeah, specialists.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We’re taking this as.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

There’s a number of them, yeah.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

As an editorial change.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Yeah.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Any other discussion for the discussion?

Mike Koren, WI:

Mike Koren, Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies, NCSS Board of Directors. Susan, is this something that Michael Simpson and the Publications Department would be able to accomplish within the timeframe of the next year?

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

The editorial calendar is probably at least four issues out. I think we’d be able to do it. I’m not sure that we’d be able to do all of the publications. But if, I think Michael will be able to do it.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Go ahead.

Gail Vanderhyde, OR:

Gail Vanderhyde, Oregon Council. An editorial change: U.S. Census Bureau and Census Bureau should be capitalized. It’s a proper noun.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you. Go ahead.

Bill O’Sick, VA:

Bill O’Sick again. Editorial change. I think that you should have “within the Census Bureau,” not “with” the Census Bureau. Specialists within the United States Census Bureau.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Question on that. Say it again. So after.

Male speaker:

Under program specialist, you know, within the Census Bureau.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Are you in the BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED? Okay.

Male speaker:

It says with the Census Bureau in each state as it is now. Shouldn’t that, I would think shouldn’t it say within the Census Bureau of each state?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, I see. And that’s an editorial change?

Any other? Okay. There were no other people coming to the microphone. We’ll call this to a vote. Okay. Let me reread the BE IT RESOLVED with the editorial changes.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS devote an issue of Social Education, and Social Studies and the Young Learner, and Middle Level Learning on the importance of the census including lesson plans and,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that NCSS maintain a resource list of and links to Partnership Specialists within the U.S. Census Bureau in each state for the school district and teachers and to post these lists and to link them on the NCSS website.

Okay. We have somebody?

Tom Webb, MI:

Tom Webb, Michigan Council for the Social Studies. I’m very sorry for this but I thought we were still discussing verbiage. But I’d like to speak a little bit against this, not because I don’t support the census or what they do. But I wonder if it is our position as a House of Delegates to dictate to the publication people exactly what it is we are publishing. Because I think this opens the door to a lot of these types of resolutions.

My second concern is that I see these as two separate resolutions of which I, I can be split on. I would fully support the second, but not the first. Thank you.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

I have a point of clarification. When these resolutions are passed they then go to the Board of Directors. So you are an advisory body to the Board of Directors. But the Board of Directors would have to also pass this.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Does anyone want to extend the, the debate?

Female speaker:

I ask that we extend the debate by one minute please.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

There’s been a motion to extend the debate by one minute. All those in favor say aye. All those opposed say nay. The nays have it. We will now vote on the proposed resolution. Everybody vote. I think next year we need to have some music while we’re [inaudible]. Oh no, we don’t want to do that. And you see the results. The motion passes. The resolution passes.

Okay, we are now to Resolution 09-02-01: Citizenship Education After President Barack Obama’s Speech to America’s Students, September 2009.

RESOLVED that NCSS redouble its efforts to teach students, school staff and supervisors, administrators, state school officials, parents and the general public that citizenship education is important through K-16 and that government is of the people, by the people and for the people by issuing statements approved by the NCSS officers and Board of Directors to chief school officers in each state on the importance of citizenship education and learning about participation in government K-16 in the light of President Barack Obama’s speech to American students of September 8, 2009 and the sometime negative reaction to it, creating special issues of NCSS’ Social Education and Social Studies and the Young Learner that states the importance of participation in government by students of all ages and grade levels. These issues may include research showing the importance of citizenship education in creating an informed citizenry and includes hands-on lessons for teachers to use at different grade levels. Offering upon request educational assistance and the expertise to NCSS affiliated state and local councils to produce their own citizenship education publications, workshops and conferences on citizenship educations and participation in a democracy and identifying expert among NCSS members in citizenship education who will be able to offer educational assistance and expertise to NCSS and state and local councils to produce these various publications and conduct workshops and conferences on citizenship education.

Recognize the lady first.

Tina Elsworth, MO:

My name is Tina Elsworth. I’m from the Missouri delegation. And the first thing I have is a question. I know we’re not debating the WHEREAS so this is just a question. Did NCSS actively support the viewing of the speech?

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

We did not weigh in one way or another.

Tina Elsworth, MO:

Okay. And the second thing is I would like to propose an amendment to the title so that it would read “Citizenship Education Through Presidential Speeches” because I think the way it currently reads it looks like there’s an active endorsement of the candidate or of the current president. And I think that we need to keep that neutral.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

So you would like to change it how again please?

Tina Elsworth, MO:

So that it would read “Citizenship Education Through Presidential Speeches.”

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay.

Tina Elsworth, MO:

And then also on the second paragraph of the RESOLVED after the K.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Wait let’s take.

Tina Elsworth, MO:

I’m sorry.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

This is editorial right?

Tina Elsworth, MO:

Yes sir.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Is that amendment or editorial? We’re going to have to make that an amendment.

Tina Elsworth, MO:

Okay.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

So would you read the amendment again please?

Tina Elsworth, MO:

“Citizenship Education Through Presidential Speeches.”

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

To American students, September 2009?

Tina Elsworth, MO:

No. I would just. Right after Presidential [inaudible].

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

So “Citizenship Education Through.”

Tina Elsworth, MO:

“Through” not “After.”

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

“Through Presidential Speeches.”

Tina Elsworth, MO:

“Through Presidential Speeches” yes.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

There’s a point of order.

Ron Adams, NH:

Ron Adams, New Hampshire. I just. It’s not on this, but you didn’t announce the vote on the last resolution and I couldn’t read it and I would just like to have that vote.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

I thought I did. Okay. The last resolution was fifty-seven percent in favor and forty-one percent against.

So now we’re at the amendment. We need a second for the amendment. And it’s been seconded.

Female speaker:

Can we take out “To America’s Students” please?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, is there any discussion on the amendment. Okay, Peggy, did you want to discuss the amendment?

Peggy:

No sir.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, any discussion on the amendment.

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Yeah, I think that would have to be two amendments because the intent of the motion. To take out Barack Obama, I accept enormously. I tried to write this as a spin off of the idea that the speech took place. And I thought that it didn’t support our idea at NCSS of teaching civics and education and teaching democracy and teaching participation in democracy. So the idea of removing the President’s name is not a problem. But he was speaking to children and somehow there seems to be the feeling that presidents speaking to children should be a no-no. And I don’t think that should be part of the way we look at our government. So if that’s separated out it would make more sense.

I also want to clarify the meaning of NCSS support of the speech is that state and local council leaders got an e-mail alerting us to the speech from NCSS and that was the jump off point to why I wrote this.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Anyone else want to speak for or against the amendment? Is there one coming. We can’t separate it. We have to vote on the amendment first.

Mark Previte, PA:

Mark Previte, Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies. Are we limiting ourselves here just to presidential speeches? As a former high school social studies teacher for twenty-eight years I also allowed my students to watch C-Span speeches of the House of Representatives and the Senate. Do we also include that as well? It’s just a question I wanted to bring up.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

That would have to be another amendment, possibly even another resolution for next year’s committee. My term ends. Go ahead.

Hillary Rosenthal, IL:

Hillary Rosenthal, Illinois. If we take out the reference to that particular speech would just, the resolution could it be titled “Citizenship Education” and nothing else?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We still have. That’s a separate issue okay?

Hillary Rosenthal, IL:

Okay.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Any other discussion about the amendment?

Wick Grace, MS:

Yes this is Wick Grace from Mississippi. I move for a question on the amendment.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Question has been called for the amendment. Second for that? Second. Okay. So now we’ll vote on the amendment. Or we’re voting to stop debate? Okay. Voting to stop debate. We are, have to vote now to stop debate. All those in favor to stop debate say aye. Opposed say nay. The ayes have it.

So now we will vote on the amendment. The amendment is to change the, the title of “Citizenship Education Through Presidential Speeches” for the new title. Okay, this is a voice vote. All those in favor of the amendment say aye. All those opposed say nay. We will vote by clicker. And Peggy and Sue I thank you for your patience standing there respectfully.

Peggy Altoff, CO:

We are the most patient people in the world.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

I understand. That’s why I thanked you.

A is yes, in favor of it. B will be nay, no. Are we ready to vote? Ready to vote. Sixty-four percent yes. Thirty-six percent no. So the title has been changed.

Okay now we’ll have, for the discussion on the resolution.

Peggy Altoff, CO:

Hi. Peggy Altoff, Colorado. For a variety of reasons that have nothing to do with the title, Colorado is withdrawing its support for this resolution.

Secondly, and I’m a firm believer in the messiness of democracy. And nothing is a better example than this House of Delegates, but I would. I love it, you know? And this is like my twenty-first year or something in the House. And other people have beat me. But I’ve never seen as, as much editorial comments. And I would like to suggest to the body that unless it’s a substantive amendment, that we leave the editorializing to staff because they do. We have the best editors in the world. And that’s from someone who just loves to edit everything. So thank you.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you. Sue.

Sue Blanchette, TX:

Sue Blanchette from Texas. As much as I am in favor of the content and the concepts behind this, I move to table this amendment, this resolution until it can be less politicized.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Sue, we are not able to table it. Okay. We can vote to defeat it. We can postpone it indefinitely. We can vote for it. We can vote against it. And postponing it indefinitely will defeat the bill, or the resolution.

Sue Blanchette, TX:

May I ask a point of order?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Yes, please go ahead.

Sue Blanchette, TX:

Can we refer it back to committee?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We can refer it back to committee.

Sue Blanchette, TX:

Then may I please withdraw my previous statement and request that it be returned to committee?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We need a second. Second is heard. Okay. It is moved and seconded to refer the resolution back to the Resolutions Committee. Any discussion on this? Okay. So any, this is, this is on the change that Sue bought up, take it to, send it back to the Resolutions Committee. Any discussion on this?

Rosella Kirshkesner, NY:

Rosella Kirshkesner, ATSS/UFT, NYC, New York State. And we’re one of the sponsors of this resolution. And I think that one of the reasons why this resolution came out, and it resonates with me as I listened to John Lewis’ speech yesterday, is that there is an undercurrent of racism that still exists in our society. And I strongly feel that the reaction to the President’s speech.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Well hold it.

Rosella Kirshkesner, NY:

Okay, so I’m talking in favor of keeping this on the table now, not referring it back to committee. And that’s why I’m, that is why I think that it is important for us as a social studies organization to be able to discuss this openly and honestly. And to send this back to committee at this point in time would cut off that discussion, which I think is valuable.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Bob.

Bob:

Hi Terry. I don’t want this job next year. Let me just ask a question. It’s a point of order, if you’re sending it back to committee, it’s going back to Resolutions Committee. We don’t write resolutions. We get resolutions and we rework them without changing meaning. So, I, I just want a point of order on this. What committee is getting this?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

But Bob I think, somebody help me out with this, I think it would go to Resolutions because during our time, like yesterday morning when we, people could bring resolutions and help with the editing of it and clarification like we had. That process would probably happen at that time.

Bob:

Fine.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

So, yes, there’d be another hearing.

Marjorie Hunter, AR:

Marjorie Hunter from Arkansas Council of the Social Studies and I am agreeing with the returning it to committee. This is messy and needs a lot of editorial. It needs a lot of work to make it clear exactly what this resolution is.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Sue.

Sue Blanchette, TX:

Sue Blanchette from Texas. She basically said what I wanted to say but I’ll reiterate it. It is not that I am opposed to this. It is not that I am not cognizant of the national underlying racism. It is simply that I feel this right now is ungainly, is un, un, ungainly is the wrong word. But it is too wordy and too convoluted and I’d like to see it cleaned up so that we get the intent across without the verbiage.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Any further? Okay.

Male speaker:

Just a question about point of order. It’s my understanding that some people want to table the refer back to committee, but my understanding, I thought, of the Robert’s Rules of Order is before you could do that you had to hear a debate on the resolution itself. And then to send it back to committee or to ask the people that proposed it to take it back and readmit it to the Resolutions Committee.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We have had debate and according to the parliamentarian.

Male speaker:

Well I mean debate on the amend, on the resolution itself.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

That’s, that’s.

Male speaker:

We had debate on the title, but not debate on the resolution itself.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Oh, we first of all opened up debate for the resolution, okay. And according to the parliamentarian. Okay. A referral is in order at any time, okay, prior to debate or after debate. Okay.

Lois Wolff, GA:

Lois Wolff, Georgia Council for Social Studies. Having served on the Resolutions Committee, we were charged with cleaning up resolutions, making them so that they would read more easily or combine resolutions when we saw that possibility. But I don’t believe it was ever our purpose to clarify an intent of the resolution. That would be from the folks that submitted it. Is that not the purpose of the Resolutions Committee to just, you know, clean it up, make it more easily read? But when we are messing with the intent, we’re assuming what that council said. And I didn’t believe that that was our purpose in the Resolutions Committee.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

I believe you’re correct. I think Thursday, when we read these resolutions at our meeting on Thursday, that was the time when people could support it or ask a lot of questions about that for clarification such as what you mentioned. And when we meet Friday mornings we do editorialize and try to clean up language, you know, wordsmith, etc.

From the House of Delegates Manual, if I may read please. Resolutions resolve, receive resolutions, Resolutions Committee receive resolutions from NCSS members, affiliates, associate groups and community representatives prior to the annual conference. And during the conference at times designated for hearings, and this was Friday morning from nine to eleven thirty, during the hearing members of the committee, the Resolutions Committee, meet with sponsors of resolutions, accept, return for revision, or reject resolutions in accordance of the House rules. That’s what we did Friday morning.

Lois Wolff, GA:

So then is this the appropriate time though then to say that this resolution can be returned or?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

That’s what the vote will, will determine.

Lois Wolff, GA:

Okay, thank you.

Melissa Callum, WI:

Melissa Callum, Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies. I support the vote on the floor to return the resolution to committee. The National Council for the Social Studies is an apolitical organization. I strongly feel that the wording of this resolution makes us look biased. We cannot afford, during this political time, to look biased. We must maintain our political anonymity. Thank you.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Anyone speak for the referral or against it? Okay, we’ll take a vote. We will vote. We are voting to send this resolution back to the Resolution Committee. All those in favor say aye. All those opposed nay. The ayes have it. It will go back to the Resolutions Committee.

You’ve all heard of a person, your right hand person. She’s sitting on my right side. This lady is it. She is a wonderful parliamentarian and we owe her a great debt.

Gloria Cofer, Parliamentarian:

Thank you so much.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We’re not half way through yet. So we’re still going to use you.

Resolution 09-02-02: Teaching About American Indian Culture and Current Events.

We need to change one thing before we go further. Where it says cosponsored, should be “Canada Community” not “Canadian.” Would that be changed please? Okay.

BE IT RESOLVED the, BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies call for a new commitment to the tenants of Title VII by schools across the nation and encourage the producers of teaching materials related to the History, Culture and Current Events of American Indians, Alaskan Natives, and including Native Hawaiians to enable classroom teachers to fulfill their obligation to the unique cultural challenges facing these students.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that NCSS issue a strongly worded position statement endorsing the tenants of Title VII in recognizing the increased urbanization of native peoples whose children are often being educated in the public schools of this nation.

Any questions or, or speak for or against this resolution? We have someone, okay, point of order.

Female speaker:

My question is why did we capitalize culture and current events? Because that’s the name of the committee?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay.

Female speaker:

Current Events?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Are they editorial? That’s the way that the title is written? Yeah, we, we I remember we did look that up. That’s how Title VII is written.

Anyone else? Okay, then we will vote on this resolution. We’ll use our clickers. A is for and B is against. And C abstain. The results are eighty-eight percent in favor, nine percent against and three percent abstain.

Okay we move on to Resolution 09-02-03: NCSS Supports Common Core Standards for the Social Studies. Turn the page for the BE IT RESOLVED.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS urge the President of the United States, the leadership of the United States Department of Education, the National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices and The Council of Chief State School Officers to develop and establish common core standards for social studies that will bring together social studies experts from the National Council for the Social Studies and other professional organizations to develop and review common core social studies standards that underscore the critical importance of social studies as an indispensible aspect of every child’s educational experience; and demonstrate the need for social studies to be adopted by the U.S. Department of Education and individual states and territories as an essential part of any core curriculum; and be framed by The Partnership for 21st Century Skills to include critical thinking, problem solving and communication skills in the context of civil, civic literacy, economic, financial literacy and global awareness and thereby advance the cause of student success in the social studies in order that they become competent, responsible citizens and productive working members in domestic and international society.

Speak for or against the resolution?

Monir Farrah:

Yes, Monir Farrah, The International Assembly. I have an amendment to make here, just wording here. Under BE IT RESOLVED and going all the way to the CCSSO to, to make it to instead of “to develop and establish” to have it.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Excuse me, you’re in the fourth paragraph of the BE IT RESOLVED?

Monir Farrah:

The first paragraph of BE IT RESOLVED.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

The first paragraph, okay.

Monir Farrah:

Yes. Instead of “to develop and establish a common core” “to support the establishment and the development.” Because with all due respect and to the high position, highly esteemed position, of any president and governor, they should not be developing and establishing. They should be supporting the development and the establishment.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Could you repeat that wording please?

Monir Farrah:

The wording becomes instead of “to develop and establish common core” it would be “to support the, the establishment and development of common core standards for social studies.”

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, so “to support in the development.”

Monir Farrah:

Establish the, to, “to support the establishment and development of common core standards.”

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

To support the establishment and development.

Monir Farrah:

Yes.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Of common core standards.

Monir Farrah:

Yeah, because this way, otherwise.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

To support and establish the development. Is that correct?

Monir Farrah:

Yes.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

To support the established?

Monir Farrah:

Well, to support the development and establishment, I’m sorry.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

To support the development and establishment.

Monir Farrah:

Right.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay.

Monir Farrah:

Of common core.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Do you have that so we can see it? Okay, the yellow represents it. Is that correct sir?

Monir Farrah:

That’s correct.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Is there a second for this? There is a second. Any. We’ll have now a debate on the amendment. Speaking for or against it. We’ve got one person coming. And this, and you’re speaking for the amendment or against it?

Michelle Herczog, CA:

We’re speaking against the amendment. I’d like to explain why.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay.

Michelle Herczog, CA:

My name is Michelle Herczog. I’m representing California Council for Social Studies. Our president, Cheryl Rehome-Dean, is back there. She was injured and is having trouble walking. So she’s asked me to represent the. Here’s our situation and what brought, brought this forth. We realize now that Arne Duncan, Secretary of Education, and the U.S. Department of Ed has this Race to the Top money and for states to apply for that money we have the conditions [inaudible].

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, Michelle, remember just to speak about the amendment.

Michelle Herczog, CA:

Okay, the amendment. So the amendment is about to apply for that money states have to adopt common core standards. And right now there are common core standards for English, Language Arts and Math. But there are none that exist for social studies. So what this, what this, what we’re trying to say is we want NCSS to urge them to establish those common core standards, not necessarily to support the development of them. But we want them to establish common core standards for social studies so that we’re not left behind.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Speaking against.

Marsha Ingrao, CA:

I’m Marsha Ingrao also from California Council for the Social Studies and I’m just here to support Michelle’s against speech. It seems like when you, the more supports that you put in, the less work that get’s done. I think what we’re urging is that we want to have it done and therefore just support it weakens it a little bit.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you. Anyone else to speak for or against the amendment? If not, then we will take a vote on the amendment. And we’ll do a voice vote. And the amendment is to change the wording “to support the development and establishment of common core standards” as it says there in the yellow. All those in favor say aye. All those opposed say nay. Get the clickers out. You know we may laugh at this but if we didn’t have the clickers, we’d be doing this by paper ballot, so. A is for the amendment and B is against. We’re ready. The amendment is fifty-eight percent in favor and forty-two percent against. So the amendment passes.

Now we’ll go back to debate for or against the resolution. Anyone speaking for or against it?

Brenda Barr, CO:

So we’d like to. And we’re sorry, but we’re not from. I’m Brenda Barr from Colorado. And the president-elect from CS4.

Mert Martens, OK:

And I’m Mert Martens representing NSSSA in Oklahoma.

Brenda Barr, CO:

And we’re not from Canada. But we want to apologize. We would like to do an affiliated. We would like to make a friendly amendment on the second paragraph.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Just remember there is no friendly amendment.

Brenda Barr, CO:

Okay.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Just the amendment.

Mert Martens, OK:

Okay.

Brenda Barr, CO:

Okay. A disgruntled amendment? No, I’m just kidding. It’s really not, it’s really not. We just want to make an amendment that on paragraph two where it says “the National Council of Social Studies” that we add “and its affiliate organizations.”

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Instead of other professional organizations?

Mert Martens, OK:

No, no, in addition to.

Brenda Barr, CO:

In addition to.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, so then, say it again.

Brenda Barr, CO:

Social Studies. Let’s see. National Council for the Social Studies [comma].

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Comma.

Brenda Barr, CO:

It’s affiliate organizations.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Comma.

Brenda Barr, CO:

Comma.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Or not comma but and then.

Brenda Barr, CO:

And other professional organizations.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Is there a second for this? Second. Any discussion? Question’s been called. Just wait ‘til he gets, the amendment comes up before we vote. That’s the second paragraph there in the yellow, “bring together social studies experts from the National Council for the Social Studies, it’s affiliate organizations and other professional organizations.” Okay. All those in favor say aye. All those opposed, nay. The ayes have it.

Now back to debate on the resolution. Anyone speaking for or against it or point of orders?

Michelle Herczog, CA:

I’m back thank you. As I said before, you know, the common core standards initiative, that train is on the track [inaudible].

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Michelle, please speak into the microphone.

Michelle Herczog, CA:

Oh, I’m sorry. Michelle Herczog. The common core standards initiative, the train is on the track, and I know many of us who lived through the nineteen eighties national standards debates, the hair goes up on the back of our necks when we think about returning to that. But the reality is that English, Language Arts and Math common core standards are virtually completed. And if states are going to be required to adopt those, we want them to also be required to adopt, or have the option to voluntarily adopt common core standards for social studies. Cause if not, we’re going to get left behind again. And so that’s the major point and purpose of this resolution is to encourage that development of common core standards for social studies. That was the first point. That NCSS and our affiliate organizations and the experts that we work with are a part of that from the get go in the development of those standards, and that it incorporate some of those Partnership for 21st Century Skills that are so powerful to our work, that builds critical thinking, innovative thinking, creativity and makes the application of social studies alive for all students. So we’re hoping that NCSS, that if this is passed, NCSS can take the proactive position and be out in front instead of lagging behind and being reactive. We need to be a leader in this effort. Thank you.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. And I would like to make an amendment to Michelle’s speech. The hair doesn’t go on the back, rise on the back of everyone’s neck. Next.

Scott Wiley:

My name is Scott Wiley. I represent the Issues Centered Education Community. And, while I agree.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Please speak in the microphone.

Scott Wiley:

Sorry. While I agree that we don’t want to be left behind and that we do need to make sure that social studies is considered on the table, I feel like that when we start supporting common core standards and potentially national standards along the same lines, that we are just falling more into the trap of the standardized testing that goes along with that and all of the other negative aspects that come with that. I don’t think that we should follow along English, Math, etc. I think that we should take a stand and say, there are different ways of doing this than common core standards to make sure that we are not left behind.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you.

Peggy Jackson, NM:

Peggy Jackson, New Mexico. I stand in support of this resolution. And my rationale here is that one point where it says “demonstrate the need for social studies to be adopted by the Department of Ed and individual states and territories as an essential part of any core curriculum.” In my state fifth graders are not taught social studies but one period every two weeks. This does not happen in states where we have strong standards or where those standards that are written are enforced. We have to have this support. And this is asking the Board of Directors to ask NCSS to do this. I stand in support of the amendment for my state and other states like it that do not have strong core curriculum standards.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you and debate is over. Time is up unless anyone wants to propose that we extend the debate. Seeing. Are you coming to extend? Okay. Okay. Then we’re ready to take a vote on the resolution with the amendment. And we’ll vote by clickers. You have twenty seconds. The motion passes, or the resolution passes. It is eighty-five percent in favor and fifteen percent, fifteen percent against.

If you would please, we are going to, we’re going to come back. Because of a prior commitment, if you would skip to page seven, we’re going to read Resolution 09-05-01: Recognition of NCSS President Syd Golston.

BE IT RESOLVED and please take time to read all of the WHEREAS’ because you can find out all of the wonderful things Syd has done. But BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies formally recognize and thank Syd Golston for her service and value to, to all in the social studies community and especially the NCSS membership. Anyone want to speak for or against the [inaudible]? Okay we just acknowledge this. Okay.

Syd Golston, AZ, President NCSS:

Thank you. I hate to have to leave early, but as soon as you finish here, I’m going over to introduce Greg Mortenson and he’ll be receiving the Spirit of American Award. So get on over.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

And now if you’d turn back to page six. Resolution 09-04-01: Teaching About Anti-Semitism Today. And page seven has the BE IT RESOLVED.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS regularly include in it’s conference program and publication material on teaching about anti-Semitism today. Anyone want to speak in favor or against it?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT, New York City. This resolution is in no way an attempt to take away from the wonderful things NCSS has done in teaching about the Holocaust, in teaching about respect for religions, in teaching about genocide. And as the need arises and respect and against prejudice. And as we saw in the resolution we just passed on American Indian, Native Americans, we have added to what NCSS is doing in, as part of social studies education. And I urge you to support this resolution because anti-Semitism is ripe and around the country and the world and that it needs be addressed. Is there a time limit to when this is done or where or how except that it should be at our conferences and it should be in our publications from time to time? And I urge you to support this.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you Carolyn. Anyone else choose to speak for or against this amendment? Okay. Then we will vote on the amendment, or the, not the amendment, the resolution. Oh.

Ron Adams, NH:

Ron Adams, New Hampshire. At the risk of being targeted as anti-Semitic, I am opposed to the resolution simply because I think it, it is really narrow. We should be speaking out at the conference and all of our materials about racism, prejudice against religions, different religions, be they Muslim, Christian, Catholic, whatever, Jewish. And I think it, it’s rather narrow. I think it should really be broader. Thank you.

Arlene Gardner, NJ:

I really, I support this.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Fix the microphone.

Arlene Gardner, NJ:

I’m sorry. I have to make it lower. Yes. Arlene Gardner from the New Jersey Council for Social Studies. I, I agree with the last person’s comment. I wouldn’t oppose this, but I would suggest, and I actually have a page of amendments written out, that it really should be expanded. I can read it for you. Where it starts with the first WHEREAS NCSS has actively encouraged particular values and respect for all religions and should continue to do so. After religions, I would add race, ethnicities, gender and sexual orientation. I would continue that through the document.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, now hold on. Tell us where you’re at again please. But which one? Okay. So you’re reading the?

Arlene Gardner, NJ:

Yeah, I’m sorry, I, I really was only going to do this if the issue was raised. But I do think it should be broader. If you go to the one, two, three, fourth WHEREAS. Neither anti-Semitism nor discrimination have vanished with the Holocaust or the Civil Rights Movement is what I’ve added for you. On the last WHEREAS I would again edit the end. Discrimination on the basis of religion, race, ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation have continued. And for the BE IT RESOLVED, I think it’s very consistent. NCSS regularly include in its conference program and publications material on teaching about anti-Semitism and discrimination today. And this may be pushing it too far but, the need for every individual to take responsibility to combat discrimination. And I’m sorry, it’s, it’s a lot of changes, but it really is making one point, which is to make it broader.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Right.

Arlene Gardner, NJ:

Okay, thank you.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

So now are you making that as an amendment?

Arlene Gardner, NJ:

I am proposing all of those changes as an amendment.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Is there a second? There is a second. We’re going to try to bring up the WHEREASs. In that process we’ll have debate on the amendment. Okay? Okay.

Bill O’Sick, VA:

I’m Bill O’Sick again from Virginia Council Social Studies. I’m against changing it as it stands now. First of all, my understanding was we were debating something else when she voted to change the editorial [inaudible]. Unless New York would want to change it, I vote that we keep it as it is. My father liberated Dachau Concentration in World War II. And to the day he died in 1994 he saw in the United States anti-Semitism more rampant than he did when he was in Germany he told me before he died. So I think we need, there need to be more readings, more publications on the anti-Semitism itself. I teach in a ninety percent black school district and when I told them when we were talking about the Holocaust, they had no idea what anti-Semitism meant. They had no idea what the Holocaust meant, so I think we need to leave the wording as it is and vote on it like it is. Thank you.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you. Go ahead.

Female speaker:

This is a procedural question. If, I was asking the maker, if you want to change the title does that become a separate motion? Not changing the WHEREAS, but changing the title. Which supersedes which?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Technically we need to do the amendment first. Then we could bring your issue up later.

Female speaker:

Okay.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

This will be another amendment.

We’re working on typing up the changes to the WHEREASs. Would the author of the amendment come up please?

Female speaker:

I’m here.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

No.

Female speaker:

Oh the other [inaudible].

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Not the. The author of the amendment. Come up to the front please, not to the microphone.

Arlene Gardner, NJ:

Oh, I’m sorry.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Up to the front, I’m sorry. Okay. Hey don’t apologize. Carolyn do you want to speak for or against the amendment? Carolyn? You want to speak for or against the amendment?

Carolyn Herbst, NY:

Look, there was no need to add or subtract things about the American Indian. We knew that it was important to do. The intent of this is to deal with anti-Semitism cause we know it’s important to do. I would have no objection if we could create another amendment, another resolution from the floor using all the wording of this and adding all the other things that the person to the amendment wanted to make. And if that would be considered a written amendment that everybody could see, I have no objection to having another resolution. I agree with everything the person wanted to add to this as being important for NCSS to do. But that’s not the resolution at hand. If we can have a resolution from the floor that has all the wordings of this except add those other things instead and take away anti-Semitism and [inaudible] and become another resolution, that’s fine with me. But the topic of this was anti-Semitism.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We’re going to, we’re going to take a voice vote on this suggestion. Would you be comfortable on voting on the amendment without seeing it? Okay. That, that’s what I needed to hear. We’re just trying to speed up the process.

To remind you of a resolution cannot be introduced during this session. It had to be introduced yesterday. So no new resolutions can come before the HOD today.

Imagine you up here typing under pressure okay? And I sincerely do appreciate your patience. I mean, I think we have pretty much the same number here as we’ve started out, which is good. We know the session has probably gone longer than most of us thought. So appreciate you hanging in there with us [inaudible].

Male speaker:

Excuse me. Can I ask a question?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Sure.

Male speaker:

Are we changing this now without voting on it yet? I thought we were voting to [inaudible].

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We’re voting on the amendment of the WHEREASs. And we’re typing them up right now so you can see them.

Male speaker:

Oh, okay.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. The changes are in blue. If you look on the screen. We’re changing them to red. It’s easier to see. Yes. Red will work? Okay. And I would like to make, I’m not taking a vote, I’m asking you. Please recognize Anton our editor.

Male speaker:

Point of order. Yeah, I had a problem here this morning and I think, I think I’d like to address this to the Robert’s Rules of Order. It seems to me that in the past and it also seems to be on another council that I sit, Pennsylvania State Educations Associations Resolutions Committee, that before we can adjust somebody’s resolution, it has to be accepted by the people who, the, the adjustment, the amendment has be accepted by the people that put the resolution forward. These people, I think, have the right to have their resolution either amended or voted on as it is put forward. And in previous years, I think that this House has used friendly amendments. And, and so I’m struggling with that today. I’m a seven year veteran here and I’m pretty positive that these people have the right to say no, we reject that amendment to our resolution. And so if I could have that point of order checked please.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

You are correct.

Male speaker:

Excuse me Terry. I.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Just a moment. Hold on. I’m sorry. The body decides on the amendment, not the author.

Male speaker:

I would like to make a. I would wonder if we could vote on the original resolution without voting on the amendment.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

I don’t think we can. We have to vote on the amendment first.

Male speaker:

Okay.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Cause that’s up.

Male speaker:

Let’s vote on the amendment then.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Let’s. We’re ready for it. You ready? Okay. We’re voting on the amendment, which are the changes in red. You look at it on the screen. We’re going to start with verbal. The title please. Okay, thank you. Okay, everybody see the last part? Like to read it? Okay. Why don’t we just, just scroll down from the top please.

Female speaker:

Resolutions chair? I’d also, I’d like to know where in this point we can ask for a clicker vote after you’ve read it, rather than a vote? It’s controversial and I’ve heard several on the floor ask for a clicker vote. How than can be done? Thank you.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

I’ll just consider it done. Thank you. All right. The technical term is someone called for division. Okay. Sorry we have to do voice vote first. Okay, it reads: Resolution 09-04-01: Teaching About Anti-Semitism and Discrimination Today.

WHEREAS NCSS has actively encouraged teaching of values and respect for all religions, races, ethnicities, gender and sexual orientation and should continue to do so, and

WHEREAS NCSS has done an excellent job of providing materials for teaching about genocide and violation of the human rights in the world and should continue to do so,

WHEREAS NCSS has gone, has done an excellent job of including Holocaust education prominently at its annual conference program and should continue to do so, and

WHEREAS neither anti-Semitism nor discrimination vanished with the Holocaust or the Civil Rights Movement, and

WHEREAS bombing attacks, (discretions?) discretions, such as painting the Swastikas on synagogues and other buildings in Jewish communities, desecration, I’m sorry. Bombing attacks, desecrations, such as painting of Swastikas on synagogues and other buildings in Jewish communities and physical attacks on Jews throughout the United States, Europe, South America and other parts of the world, and discrimination on the basis of religion, race, ethnicity gender or sexual orientation have continued.

BE IT RESOLVED, BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS regularly include in its conference program and publications materials on teaching about anti-Semitism and discrimination and the need for every individual to combat them today.

So this is the amendment. Point of order.

Male speaker:

Robert’s Rules: How do you deal with the friendly amendment? Answer: On occasion while a motion is being debated someone will get up and offer what he or she terms a friendly amendment to the motion. The maker of the original motion will accept the amendment and the chair will treat the motion as amended. It says this is wrong. Once a motion has been stated by the chair it is no longer the property of the mover. That the assembly, any amendment friendly or otherwise must be adopted on by the full body vote. So I apologize for my previous discussion.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you. It takes a big person to do that in front of this group. So now we are going to a voice, voice vote on the amendment. All those in favor say aye. All those opposed say nay. Division? Okay. Then we will use the clickers. A is in favor. B is against. The amendment passes. Fifty-eight percent in favor. Forty-two against.

Since the time is after ten thirty. It is about ten thirty-five, we need to, to vote to extend time. Okay. We’re going to, we’re going to ask for an extension of fifteen minutes. All those in favor? All those opposed? We’re not going to use the clickers. Ayes have it. So the time has been extended for fifteen minutes. And that will be ‘til ten fifty? Fifty, okay?

So we have, we’re going back to debate now on the current resolution with the amendment change. And there’s four minutes left to debate. Change the title please? Okay. Thank you. We’ll take care of that. Go ahead.

Becky Griffith, NC:

Becky Griffith from the North Carolina Council. And as was my fear when you start listing specific groups, you will always omit something. And I would like to make a motion to add age please with that list because age discrimination is real in this country. So you need to include age if you are going to list all the other groups.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

That’s age?

Becky Griffith, NC:

Age. Yes. And it’s a very real problem in this country today.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. If you could, you’re going to have to tell us where you would like that added on the list.

Becky Griffith, NC:

Well, we can’t see it until you put it up there.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Can you bring that back up please?

Becky Griffith, NC:

In the first WHEREAS, you’ve got to add it “respect for all religions, races, ethnicities, genders, age and sexual orientation. I guess there.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. So we have an amendment.

Becky Griffith, NC:

Ages.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Oh, yes.

Becky Griffith, NC:

Ages.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, thank you.

Becky Griffith, NC:

And I realize that has to be voted on, but I’d also, here again, same point. On the last WHEREAS. Half the world’s population lives in Africa and Asia and you’ve omitted that from the list.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Other parts of the world wouldn’t include that?

Becky Griffith, NC:

Well if you’re going to specify United States and Europe and South America what about the Eastern Hemisphere?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. That has to be made, that has to be made as an amendment. All you’re adding is the age.

Becky Griffith, NC:

That’s what I, I said though, that would need to be a separate vote there.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Yeah. Okay, it will have to be done separately. Now do you have all the places in the resolution where you want to add the word age?

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We have to have a vote before you speak against it. Before.

Are you happy with that now, are you pleased? Got to make sure she’s.

Becky Griffith, NC:

Yes. Yes sir.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, okay? So there’s the amendment. We need a second for this. Second. Okay. Any discussion on the amendment? On the amendment of adding the age? Go ahead.

Marjorie Hunter, AR:

All right, it’s Marjorie Hunter from Arkansas. Like the one previously, I suggest that we return this to committee for clarification, cleaning it up. It’s getting too wordy. It’s too cumbersome. I would suggest we move it back to the committee.

Terry Cherry, TX, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Is there a second for that motion, refer to committee? It has been seconded. Motion is to refer this resolution back to the Resolutions Committee. And with this resolution, it will take with it all pending amendments and all that have been approved. Okay? Any discussion on the motion? Okay. Call the vote. We’re voting on the motion to send this resolution back to the Resolutions Committee with amendments and changes made. All those in favor say aye. All those opposed say nay? The ayes have it. The resolution will be sent back to the Resolutions Committee.

And if you would please, turn to the last page, page eight. Resolution 09-05-02: Recognition of NCSS Conference Committee Chair.

BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies staff and membership honor and thank these members for their outstanding work and service to all our national and international colleagues and friends.

Thanks to Atlanta and the committee and we recognize that by applause. Stand up Betty and the committee.

Now as you know, we don’t know about Summer Leadership and Resolutions is taking a change. I think it’s sort of like family. If you remember when we were all young, we would always go to Aunt Betty’s house or whatever it was for Thanksgiving. It was comfortable, we were there. And when we were children, it seemed like we did it forever. And then all of a sudden Aunt Betty gets ill and what are we going to do. And so the adults decided, hey we’re going to share this. We’re going to have it at my house this year. We’ll have it at my house the next year, your house the other year like that.

And that’s where we are with writing the resolutions. We can no longer depend on Summer Institute to do that for us. We as the councils have to take that responsibility. We have to start scheduling this in our state conferences and let the members bring the resolutions to us, just not two representatives from your council or affiliates. So I would encourage you to go back today when you go back to your state councils and affiliates, schedule in resolutions in your conferences. You can all fit them in. And may have to squeeze, but please try to do this so that when we do resolutions, they will represent your whole total state. And again I would encourage you, if non NCSS members do this, this will get them involved.

And again, I also want to thank those who are new to this House of Delegates and the younger members that came up here and spoke for that. It’s always great to see young faces up here participating in the House of Delegates. I thank you.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you Terry and your committee for guiding us through that process. And I also just want to make sure Atlanta that this was a great conference. We really appreciate everything you did.

And you all we have a special treat for those of you that stayed. Not only do you get to fill out your evaluation form but Dustin has a door prize for us. So he is going to randomly draw a number and you are going to win your own set of clickers. So it’s only people who are eligible, who still have a clicker. So your chances are a lot better now.

Dustin Frank, eInstruction:

Thank you. As an old math teacher, kind of a math nerd, this process in here amazes me every year. It’s pretty interesting to watch and participate in that. But thank you again for letting us come. Please come by and visit us. Again you’re going to get. Who, if you’re still here, just let us know who you are, acknowledge that you’re still here so we know who the winner is. What you’re going to get is a class pack of thirty-two clickers for your classroom. And also a portable tablet. So if you don’t have interactive whiteboards in your class, you’ll have a portable tablet to take with you. It’s about a three thousand dollar package. So if you will come and make contact with either myself or Mr. Ed Barnes in the back, we will get some information with you and make sure and get you in touch with your local rep so you can. It, it’s nice to get them, but it’s nice to know how they work too. So we’ll hopefully get you in touch with somebody. So here’s how this works. I’m just going to come down here and draw a random person from the class. So student twenty-five, is remote number twenty-five still in use? Right back there? Okay. Make sure and see us. I’ll get the evaluation up and running and that way as you exit you can actually take part in the evaluation on your clicker.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Okay you all, real quickly we’re going to do evaluations. If you do it on your clicker, don’t do, don’t circle the numbers on your sheet. We just want the sheet though for the formative evaluation where you can really give us some comments about things that we can do to improve to make this process smoother. Any suggestions that you have we would love those to be written down. And if you can just hand it to a Steering Committee member on your way out.

But right now, Dustin are you ready for the evaluation? Okay, as soon as your clicker says question one, you can start. And you just complete. Okay you just answer and send. And then when you get finished, if you’ll just pass your. I guess you can hand your click in, out as you leave. Just make sure a Steering Committee member gets it.

Dustin Frank, eInstruction:

Your clicker should say sending and then receiving. My computer sends the evaluation out to yours. It will eventually say question one. Then you can migrate through the evaluation at your own pace as you decide to leave. Just push the arrow at the top to skip it. The right arrow key.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

And while you all are doing this, I’m going to ask Sue Blanchette to come to the front and she’s going to close out the meeting. Oh and then Susan Griffin.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

This is a thank you to Tara Sides for doing such a phenomenal job. It’s from the Steering Committee and the staff.

Tara Sides, SC, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you Susan. I appreciate it. Thank you. I appreciate. Thank you.

Sue Blanchette, TX:

This is what happens when you’re low man on the totem pole. You get to close out the meeting. Absolutely. What can I tell you? Okay. This is just a reminder that the Steering Committee will collect the evaluation forms and as soon as you’ve finished with your clickers or your forms, please take them to the back. And please don’t leave with the clickers cause they’ll come hunt you down I’m sure.

Are there any other announcements to be made at this time? Committee members, the new committee members please come up front. Or, and please come to Denver next year. If there are no other, no other business, I declare this meeting adjourned.

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