90th Annual Meeting of the

National Council for the Social Studies

54th House of Delegates

November 12-13, 2010

Denver, Colorado


Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Again, if the delegates would please take their seats. Thank you. Would the House please come to order? Good afternoon. My name is Anton Schulzki. I am the chair of the Steering Committee for the House of Delegates. It’s my pleasure to introduce the NCSS President, Steven Goldberg.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you. Good afternoon. I’d like to call on Dorsee Johnson-Tucker, one of our co-local arrangements chairs to lead us in the Pledge of Allegiance.

Dorsee Johnson-Tucker, CO:

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible with liberty and justice for all.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you Dorsee. I’d like to welcome the delegates to the 54th House of Delegates. I’d like to introduce the people sitting here on the platform. To my immediate right is Anton Schulzki, Steering Committee Chair. To the left is Liz Hind, Steering Committee Vice Chair. To my immediate left is Maria Senelli who is the, on the Steering Committee. To the extreme left is Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director and Secretary of the House of Delegates. And to my extreme right is our parliamentarian, Gloria Coffer.

A reminder that the minutes were approved by the Steering Committee since the 54th HOD is not the same body as the 53rd HOD.

Okay. Our next item of business now is the adoption of the agenda. The agenda is printed in the HOD Manual, which you should have, on pages five and six. A correction to the printed agenda in the HOD Manual. There is one correction, and that is the FASSE report will be given tomorrow morning at the beginning of the session, second session and not this afternoon. At this point I would like to entertain a motion to adopt the agenda with the correction.

Speaker:

So moved.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

There has been accept, motion accepted, agenda. All in favor?

Speakers:

Aye.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Opposed? Okay the agenda is adopted.

Let me just, it’s now customary for me to review for you the purpose of the HOD. So, I’ll do this very quickly. The purpose of the HOD is to provide a means for the members of NCSS to participate in the development of policies for the organization. The HOD serves as a forum for issues relating to both the organization and the profession. The HOD additionally serves as the business meeting of the organization and considers resolutions brought to the House. These resolutions will represent the principles, beliefs and actions that the general membership, as represented by you, recommends to the Board of Directors for current and future work of NCSS. These resolutions shouldn’t [inaudible] guide the business operations of NCSS, address issues in social science inquiry and provide direction on the nature of social studies education. They will also acknowledge the social and political issues which are of concern to social studies educators but do not have direct impact on the nature of social studies education. Importantly, the resolutions may not change the structure of NCSS nor bind NCSS to spend money. In short, resolutions express ideas, recommendations, issues and concerns relevant to NCSS and its work to promote quality teaching and learning of social studies.

It is now my privilege to introduce Joan Hollins, the Chair of the Credentials Committee. Is she here? She’s outside. Should we go out and get her? It would make sense. Mr. Daly could you possibly go out there and see if she’s finished so we can get the Credentials Report?

Apologize. No you don’t want to hear me sing. And you don’t want to watch me dance. Tell us some jokes? Well the weather is nice. Okay. Why don’t we just take a few minutes break in your seats and talk among yourselves until she comes in. Give you a tie. Here she comes, we think, maybe not. Okay, she’s coming.

Okay, so now it’s my pleasure to introduce Joan Hollins from the Colorado Council for the Social Studies, representing the Credentials Committee. Whoops, coming the wrong way, okay.

Joan Hollins, CO, Chair, Credentials Committee:

Okay. I am pleased to introduce the Credentials Committee. We have student volunteers from the University of Wisconsin, from Stephen’s Point, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown and Lockhaven University.

As chair of the Credentials Committee, I am pleased to report that we have a hundred and fifty four delegates that are registered and certified to vote in the House of Delegates as of 3:45 today, Friday, November 12th 2010. I move the adoption of the Credentials Report.

Speaker:

Second.

Joan Hollins, CO, Chair, Credentials Committee:

Motion is seconded. You okay. Thank you.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

All those in favor of approving the Credentials Report, please say aye. Opposed? Okay, the ayes have it and the agenda, the Credentials Report has been approved. Okay.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Good afternoon. My name is Anton Schulzki. I am the chair of the Steering Committee for the HOD. I live in Colorado Springs. I represent the Canada Community. So welcome to all of you from both Canada and Colorado.

I am joined by members of the Steering Committee, Liz Hind, representing CUFA is Vice Chair, Maria Senelli, who has already been introduced, Gloria McElroy from Tennessee, and Shelly Singer from Illinois. Shelly could not be with us today.

What I’d like to do at this point now is basically go through a couple of notions on the Steering, on this report from last year. We took a good deal of time to go through the evaluations. You’ll have the opportunity to evaluate the HOD at the end of the session tomorrow. We went through them and came up with some recommendations from last year’s HOD. And they are as follows.

We will not be choosing to make any grammatical, spelling, or any kind of other typographical corrections on the fly for any of the resolutions. Anything along those lines will be handled by the NCSS staff before those resolutions go to the Board of Directors in March. So we want to make sure that we won’t do that.

Then lastly, one of the things we want to ensure is that the House of Delegates is our business meeting and so therefore we want to be respectful to the speakers. As also, as well as the listeners. Last year, there were, there were several comments that it was often difficult to hear what was going on because of some side conversations. So just as a reminder, we are the House of Delegates and not the House of Commons.

Later today we will go through a nomination process, whereby members will be selected for the various committees of the House of Delegates. And just as a reminder, everyone should have received a blue nomination form in your packet. That blue nomination form is available for you to begin to fill out. Seated delegates of affiliate councils, associated groups and communities are eligible for all the HOD committees in compliance with the eligibility as defined in, in the HOD Manual, Article X, Section 4. And just to review that real quickly. No affiliated delegation, associated group or community shall have more than one representative on any of the committees. No one from an affiliated delegation, associated council or community shall succeed someone on those communities. Candidates must be listed and seated as the delegate for the affiliated delegation, associated group or community in which they are nominated. And to avoid the conflict of interest, current NCSS Board members are not eligible to run for an HOD committee until their term on the Board expires. Any member of the Steering, Resolutions or Assignment Committee who is unable to fulfill obligations may be removed. Committee eligibility listing is in compliance with Article X, Section 7, also available in the HOD Manual. And the process is available on pages twenty five and twenty six in your Manual as well.

The Steering Committee members will select, or collect nominations at approximately 4:30. Gloria McElroy, seated up front here, will come around and take care of that. As the time approaches, we will flash up a sign just to remind you that the time is running near for those nominations. And, but we won’t stop the meeting necessarily to, to go ahead and collect them.

Information forms will be completed and organized by the HOD and you’ll have more information on those individuals tomorrow.

All potential candidates, committee meetings typically take place on the Thursday morning before the NCSS meetings, or the NCSS convention. So one of the things that you need to consider is that you have the time commitment available to you to get to the conference the day before the conference because there is a lot of committee work that happens at that time, particularly Steering and Resolutions. Candidates will introduce themselves later on. What we’re going to ask you to do is simply stand up here. You’ll introduce your name and the community or state that you represent. So example, you might say, my name is Anton Schulzki, I’m from Canada. And we move on.

No introductions will be made tomorrow. The Steering and Credentials Committee will verify the eligibility of anyone who chooses to run for that tomorrow. Voting will take place tomorrow beginning at the second session of the HOD. So it’s important that you’re here at 8:00 because voting will take place quickly. There’s a closed door policy for that voting and the doors will remain closed until after voting takes place. And, again, that will take place almost immediately tomorrow.

At this point, I’d like to turn the meeting back over to Steve for his Presidential Message.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you. Many of you heard my talk this morning, so I’m not going to give it again. But I just want to highlight a couple of things that I think are very important. Well this, I’d like to once again thank everyone who worked on this conference. I think that this was the labor of love for many of us who started this a long time ago. And I just wanted, Dorsee and I were reminded of the fact that last, over a year and a half ago when we were sitting in Atlanta we sort of came up with the theme and then the logo got, we gave birth to the logo sitting in a Starbucks on 7th Street in Chinatown. And it goes on.

So just wanted to again, just a little bit of the, of the, of the conference, next slide. Okay. Again, I wanted, if you hadn’t had the opportunity to see the commemorative posters for the ninetieth anniversary, you should. Again, this was our opportunity to take a good look at ourselves and congratulate ourselves for ninety strong years as a professional organization and hopefully the next ninety years will be as strong. And this was the work of our Archives Committee and our Art Director, Rich Palmer, who did a great job. So again, I want to thank them for this commemoration as well.

The other thing that I want to emphasize, because I think this is really important, is the importance of the communities. This is the result of our restructuring several years ago. And if you haven’t had the chance, it’s hard to miss it actually, the way we physically set it up this year. But walk into the exhibit area, you walk through the area where the communities have tables and sign ups. And I think it’s really exciting because it’s an opportunity for you to see the vibrancy of this group. This is an online opportunity and we have our new website called NCSSConnected [inaudible]. And I just think this is a great opportunity to continue the forum of ideas and the notion that you don’t have to physically be here at the conference in order to be engaged in the important work that we’re doing.

So the communities are another thing that we want to continue to grow. We’ve approved, each year we approve additional communities and I think this says something about our addressing the needs and interests of our membership. So thank you very much for that effort. Many of you are involved in communities and I applaud the work that you’ve done. Of course the communities do meet here at the conference, but one does not have to be present in order to be active in those communities.

The other important thing that we really need to concern ourselves with is advocacy. And again, this is one of the roles that sometimes we’re not as good at as we should be: Promoting our discipline. But right now we are, as we all know, at a very critical stage. And so it’s very important for us to continue whatever efforts on the local, state and national level, to continue to promote the importance of social studies education.

And so for me one of the exciting things has been the, my appointment onto the Commission on Civics Education of the American Bar Association. And I’m the only educator on this group. But I have to tell you, I, you go to something like this with a certain degree of trepidation and say, oh you know, they’re going to look at you and say, oh he’s just a school teacher. And I don’t know about you, whenever I hear someone refer to us as school teachers, right away there’s a certain derogatory stand. I didn’t feel that way. And I was sitting just, these are three of the other members. I was sitting next to Margaret Marshall, who is the Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court. And then I had lunch with Richard Riley, who is the former Secretary of Education in the Clinton administration.

But the one who just, just blew me away was Margaret Rendell, who is the First Lady of Pennsylvania, but she’s also a federal circuit court judge. And at the end of the whole day session in D.C. she came up to me and she said, “Oh, I’m so excited. We really bonded. Didn’t we?” And I’m thinking, oh my God, you know, it’s just little old me. But it, they made me really feel that what I had to say representing all of you was very, very important. And I think this is a very, very important initiative because the ABA has not, until this point, really taken any kind of lobbying role on the Hill. And I think, I applaud them and told them that, for, it’s about time. But I didn’t say it that way. That they really have taked [taken] a step forward. And these are pretty influential people. So hopefully this initiative, we’re meeting next in Philadelphia because it turned out that about three quarters of the people on the committee are in the Philadelphia metropolitan area. So we get to do that next. So that’s another very important initiative.

I don’t want to just reiterate this, but I think you’re all familiar with our National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies, our new addition. After fifteen years, we felt it was time to do a revision. We haven’t changed our themes, but if you haven’t seen this. And you all should have received a copy, please do so. I think this is another good companion as we continue moving forward in our states in redefining what we do as social studies teachers. And again, this was a very important committee that works for several years to get this done. So this is another important step for us.

The other important initiative, and Susan will talk more about this is the Common State Standards. So I just wanted to make sure that we’re aware this is happening. But I’ll wait until Susan gives her report for her to give a little bit more information on this.

And two other things. Again, I want to just reiterate and thank the state of Florida for bringing this to us. And I’m very proud, as I said this morning, that the Board voted that we’re going to nationalize Rowe-Cappa [inaudible], which has been an effective national social studies, will become a national social studies honor society. And once we have all the details in place at every school, and we’re going to use the states as a great vehicle, and associated groups to promote this, we hope that we will be able to get this up and running for the next school year, the 2011-12 school year. And this should really, I think, be a major step in putting us more on the map. I’ve had students in my own class say to me, “How come we’re the only department that doesn’t have an honors society?” ‘Cause we have like every single one you could imagine. And I’m sure that’s true in many of the high schools. So this is another really good step.

And lastly, I just want to reaffirm the idea that we are the discipline of literacy. And I’m just going to show you a couple of images of what literacy in social studies, to me, is all about. And I think if you look at this from maps, to paintings, to photographs, to political cartoons, to text. And I love the one on the bottom left. And that is, that’s the data of the results of the Alaska election. This is literacy, and this is what we do everyday. And I think part of our message as we go forward is to continue to promote our discipline as the discipline of literacy. So I see this is our charge for this year as we continue to advocate for who we are. Thank you.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

At this time, we will entertain any, entertain any questions from the floor for our President. If you have a question, please stand up to the microphone. Seeing no questions then I move that the President’s report be accepted. No motion.

At this point I’d like to call on Lois Wolff to come up here and give a report out on the Assignment Committee. Lois.

Lois Wolff, GA:

Good afternoon. I’d like to introduce the members of the Assignment Committee. If you’ll stand when I name you. Ron Adams from New Hampshire. Sandy Senior Dauer from Connecticut. Susan Locklear, Texas. Don Imler, Pennsylvania. And Justin Lovelace from South Carolina. He could not be with us here today.

The committee reviewed the applications and assigned the following positions. I’d like to present the slate of candidates to the House. For the Archives Committee: Veronica Woodbury from Florida and Joseph Daring from Maryland. The Awards Committee: John Donnaker from Pennsylvania and Jennifer Morgan from Wisconsin. Conference Committee: Dorsee Johnson-Tucker from Colorado and Shirley Lomax from Oregon. The Government and Public Relations Committee: Erica Shanee from Montana and Jim Hill from California. The Membership Committee: Justin Godowski from Wisconsin and Jennifer Jalle from Florida. The Publications Committee: Tim Lintner from South Carolina and Susan Campbell from California. This slate of candidates is approved by presentation. Thank you.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you Lois. At this time I’d like to call on Bob Dytell to come up and talk about the Resolutions Committee. Bob.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you. I’d like to introduce the members of the Resolutions Committee. I’m not positive if everyone is here. Scott Nowak from Minnesota. Is he here? Thank you. Jeannette Stepanski from Tennessee. Lee Soliver from Arkansas. I know Lee is here. William Harris from Ohio. And my vice chair, Brad Barenhart who’s done a wonderful job from Ohio, from, I am sorry, from Kansas. Thank you.

Okay, so we are talking about resolutions. And the, there are, at this point, there are nine, there are six resolutions and three courtesy, which we’ll talk about. So there are nine resolutions at this point. And we went through a summer webinar and we went through a variety of, of conference calls and these were the resolutions that were turned in at this point. And we are open, we, you can still put a resolution in at this point. They are, you can do it today. You need to have copies of them with you, but we will talk about that in a minute.

I will just like to go through very quickly what, how we categorized the resolutions. I think it’s really important that we understand this. And I will tell you it’s on page twenty two, thank you. It’s on page twenty two. And there are five categories. They, and, just real quick. First category: current or future business operations. Second: the nature of social studies education. The third: on issues of fields of history and social science inquiry. Forth: on social political issues which are of concern to social studies educators but do not have a direct impact on the nature of social studies education. And the fifth is: of courtesy and commendation. So these are the five categories.

We are now open for any, any resolutions that would, can come from the floor. Seeing none, I have nothing more to say at this point. Then we’ll see you tomorrow morning with the resolutions. Thank you.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thanks Bob. I actually shutter to say this because, as of right now, we are actually running ahead of schedule. So at this point if those of you who are thinking about putting forth nominations, it’s really important that you go ahead and really get that information done. We’ll be collecting those information, we’ll be collecting those nominations in just a few short minutes. And we will, I’ll make one more announcement along the way to make sure that we get those. So if you’re considering taking care of that, please take care of it as soon as possible.

We’ll take a brief two minute pause while Gloria collects those and we get ready to introduce the candidates. Would the candidates for office who are going to be speaking today, if you could please line up over on this side of the House. We will arrange you and so that we can go ahead and go through the introductions an0064 time for speeches. So those candidates who are running for office, if you would please line up to my left, that would be the House right.

At this point in the, in the meeting, it is customary for the Past President to address the House and to introduce the delegates. Syd Golston could not be here this afternoon, so we’re going to turn that chore over to Steve to take care of that.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you. Before I begin, let me say a few words. We want to thank the Nominations Committee for its wonderful job in assembling a very strong slate of candidates. And Syd, of course, would ordinarily have done this but, as I said, she couldn’t make it this afternoon.

The other thing I wanted to say, because I think it’s very important for people to understand, is that the process that the Nominations Committee goes through is a very serious one and very significant vetting of the candidates takes place to make sure that each of the nominees that we’re going to hear today meets the criteria as established by the bylaws of the organization. And one of the things that we are very strong about is, in our attempts as we restructure this organization, is to reach out to as diverse and large a group of candidates as we possibly can in all aspects of the organization, starting of course right now here in the HOD where we’ve expanded beyond simply state representation to including all the associated groups, the communities, etc. And that’s our hope as we go on with the nominations as well, is that we have people who come from a variety of fields of social studies education, both in the classroom, at the university, and the teacher training forum, and in non-profit groups, and other groups that are addressing the needs of social studies teachers and educators across the country. So I think that’s very important. It’s a very strong group.

And let me just explain the rules that we’re going to have. Each of the candidates for Vice President will have five minutes to speak. And each of the candidates for Board of Directors will have three minutes. It’s very important that you follow the rules. Our timekeeper, Gloria, will make sure that we are, that you’re doing that. And she’ll, there’ll be little signs held up to give you the correct time. Okay, I am sorry there’s a quick announcement.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Just a quick announcement and a request from the, from the chair. At this point we’ve collected nominations for both the Steering Committee and for the Assignment Committee, but no one has yet stepped up for Resolutions. And we could. Oh, we have some people do so. If you could make sure we take care of that, that would ensure a smooth process for next year. Thank you.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Okay. Before I introduce the candidates for Vice President, just so we know who is going to be our President and President-Elect for next year. Sue Blanchette, Sue stand, from Texas, will be President. And moving into the role of President-Elect from Kentucky will be John Moore.

Okay. And so now I am going to introduce our candidates for Vice President. And first, from the state of Connecticut, Steve Armstrong.

Stephen Armstrong, CT, Candidate for Vice President:

Good afternoon. My name is Steve Armstrong and I’m proudly running for NCSS Vice President. I’m a long time and life time classroom and social studies teacher at both the high school and middle school level and at the college level as well. I presently supervise social studies teachers in the West Hartford, Connecticut public schools. And I’m also an adjunct professor of History at the college level at Central Connecticut State University in New Britain, Connecticut.

Why is this, any of this important? Well from my end, a large part of the NCSS membership is made up of teachers, and university professors, and instructors. I have a deep sensitivity to the issues and needs of both teachers and students at these levels and I, I’ve been there for my entire career. I walk into a school building every day of the school year. And I think that this experience provides me, as a potential leader of NCSS with a critically important perspective. I am constantly in classrooms observing teachers, students and the magnificent interchange between the two.

And I just have to tell you one story. Three weeks ago, I was observing a third grade social studies class. And I’m not making this one up, by the way. There was, they were looking at pictures of important historical figures and a girl was looking at a picture of John Kennedy at his inauguration. And she looks at it and looks over at me and looks at the picture again. She does this to me and calls me over. I go over there. She says, “Is that you?” And, and to be honest with you, my first reaction to myself was thank God somebody noticed the resemblance. But, but after that, you know I was really struck with the wide-eyed wonder that this little girl experienced as she was making in her mind a historical connection. And it’s the helping students make these historical connections that really gives me joy as a teacher.

You can read my bio, but just a couple of things I’d like you to note. With Michael Yell, I’m presently co-editing a special issue ofSocial Education on the teaching of World History. Those of you that for the last two summers may have gone to Yale, we had a Yale-NCSS combined institute on the teaching of World History. I co-chaired those. And also, right now, I’m the chair of the Government Relations/Public Relations Committee. And we want to help teachers advocate for themselves and their profession right now. And we did some stuff at our meeting today to hopefully ensure that.

I’ve also done a few things outside of NCSS that have prepared me for leadership of the organization. You should know, and you do know, I’m sure, planning of the national conference is a crucial part of the job of any chair. And I’ve chaired three Northeast Regional conferences and numerous state conferences. I know how to run a successful conference.

I’ve also been on two standards groups that have revised the Connecticut state standards. Also, I am an author. If you’re an U.S. History teacher, maybe at least some of your students are using the guide that I wrote on getting a five on the AP U.S. History test.

I have for me, three major goals for NCSS. We should continue to be at the forefront of the effort to create state social studies standards and assessments at the national level. We should also provide professional development for our members on these new standards and assessments as they develop. We should also work to develop online professional development for teachers, as fewer teachers are able to come to conferences. We have an obligation to provide online courses and online content for them.

Most importantly, we have to provide the resources and the help for teachers to advocate for themselves and for the profession at the local and state level. Many people interpret the election a couple of weeks ago as saying things are going to become more local. This is going to be true in education as well. We’ve got to help our teachers prepare for that. And if I’m elected, I will work tirelessly on this issue.

The task of NCSS in the, in the future will be difficult ones, but we always must remember our mission to serve the classroom teachers and help those teachers navigate the, an increasing hostile environment.

While leading this organization addressing these tasks, I will never forget my roots as a practicing classroom teacher. That I promise you. And thank you. And, by the way, if anybody here notices the resemblance that little third grade kid noticed, if you’d let me know just to give me some good vibes on that, I’d appreciate it. Thank you very much.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you Steve. Our second candidate for Vice President from Wisconsin, Beth Ratway.

Beth Ratway, WI, Candidate for Vice President:

Good afternoon. I thought to keep you awake and engaged you could count all the acronyms that I’ve had to put in my speech to make it five minutes. You know it’s about keeping kids engaged, seventh hour of the, of the classroom day. And you know how hard that can be. So I thought, you know, if you wanted to entertain yourselves, you could keep track of all the acronyms we use in education as we go through this work.

My name is Beth Ratway. I come to you as a mother, a student, and a teacher. And that’s really at the essence of who I am and at the heart of everything and every decision that I make. My daughter is in third grade. Her school’s in our back yard and I teach there. It’s a K-8 district. And I go and teach there voluntarily on a regular basis, and work with their social studies teachers and English/Language Arts teachers on a weekly basis just to continuously be engaged with social studies and with kids.

You can read my bio and my position statement to find out what I’m about, my experiences, and my background, and what I believe the critical issues are. I just wanted to take some time here, five minutes, to explain how every position that I have has been built off of my experiences, whether I chose to go to these experiences or they came to me. It’s all really helped me clarify and really fight for and make the connections to people that will help me fight for what we all believe in, which is that every child deserves access to a high quality social studies program in order to ensure that we have an engaged citizenry.

In my current position, which confuses everybody, and if you have questions, let me know. It’s a non-profit and I work for Regional Comprehensive Agency. So I work with SEAs. I get to work with a lot of SEAs, which is entertaining and fun. And I used to be at a SEA in Wisconsin. But I really get to frame what I want to do. So I’m working a lot with standards. I’m getting them to understand the importance of social studies standards, whether they be common, whether they are state standards, and how important that is, and how important it is to support teachers and administrators in the classroom to move forward with this work.

I also have been a teacher in high school, a professional development coordinator, a teacher consultant, and a district level coordinator. These positions have really helped me think about how to bring the curricular areas together towards a common purpose. Right, it’s K-12 social studies. It’s not K-5 social studies and then disciplinary studies from there on. It’s K-12 social studies. That’s what I believe in, and that’s what I fight for, and that’s what I work with teachers on. How do you help kids look at the issue like the Depression and look at it from the perspectives of our disciplines? Look at it from a historian’s perspective, political science perspective, geographer’s perspective, economist’s perspective, and really look at things in honor, and try to understand things from different perspectives using our disciplines. That was fast.

So my main goals: Once again it’s the key word: advocacy. I really think we need to work together collaboratively. We have so much power just in this room, but think about other groups that we have internally. We need to build a system of support that we can support each other, use our resources and use our strengths to move our agenda forward. We need a clear purpose that everybody outside of this room, outside of this conference understands. Social studies is this because this. We, these are the non-negotiable things that we bring to the table for college, career, citizenship readiness. We need to talk their talk, yet still stay true to what we believe in. And I think we can do that if we do it together. We need to bring everybody to the table because we all bring something to the table to move us forward and to get more support for the social studies.

I’m concerned, as I say in, in the statement that you have in front of you about perceptions and perspectives. I’m, I’m concerned with them internally and externally. And I think only us working together and bringing the disciplines together for teachers and students is really going to empower everybody.

I think the ten themes that we have are a really good starting point to help us clarify what we believe in, what we work towards, as well as give us some common ground to work on as content organizations. I see these goals of communication and collaboration as steps towards the main goal of social studies, and, which we can work together to prepare students to be active, informed, and engaged global citizens by, by showing them how we can do that, and how we can be engaged with each other and move an agenda forward. Thank you.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you Beth. We’re now going to move on to the candidates for the Board of Directors. This year we have four different slots that we are going to have candidates. The first will be for the Middle Level Teacher position on the Board. And our first candidate is Jennifer Dawson from Georgia.

Jennifer Dawson, GA, Candidate for Board of Directors, Middle Level Teacher:

Good afternoon. This morning at the President’s breakfast a proclamation was read proclaiming today Social Studies Day. I’m here to say that every day needs to be social studies day in our schools. Social studies education matters, and though I never intended to become a teacher, teaching social studies, particularly at the middle school level with those crazy kids, brings more joy and fulfillment than I could ever imagine. You see, twenty five years ago, I was that kid that Steve talked about this morning in that classroom where it didn’t work. My own learning and experiences and difficulties in that process shape who I am as a teacher.

Wednesday I celebrated my birthday. That morning I checked Facebook to find a message from a rather interesting and challenging sixth grader. He’s now a college freshman. His message said to me, “Happy Birthday. I’m planning on seeing the world and your class helped.” Now that made forty a little easier.

Service learning, though, has really emerged as probably the most significant part of my professional journey. Last year in response to the Atlanta floods, my service club spearheaded a school-wide relief effort to provide specific request of Clarkdale Elementary, the school many of you saw under water on the national news.

Earlier this year my students also experienced real life intersections between our standards and what goes on, as an earthquake in Haiti occurred just weeks before we emerged on studying Latin America. They became real life entrepreneurs as they found a grassroots organization to create a business called Mystery Friend and sell carnations and then reveal those carnations. That’s what it’s all about to me at the middle school level, finding ways to make what they’re learning real.

Four years ago I did something with a book by Paul Fleishman called “Seed Folks.” I created a class for accelerated students. And the thrill probably of my teaching career thus far happened three weeks ago today. I received notification that I got a grant from NEA and Target to have those students, current and former students, create a sustainability garden in, at my school. And sadly, actually two weeks ago tonight, students decided to, former students decided to burn down the ISS trailer and that is where that sustainability garden is now going to be built. That is where we see the transformative nature of social studies in the world.

Last evening, though, I visited the Columbine Memorial in Littleton. That experience slapped me cold in the face and made me realize what we do as social studies educators matter. We cannot be relegated to a secondary status as social studies educators. What we do in our classrooms and the wider world that seeks to open is what matters.

It would be a privilege to bring my voice and my passions to advocate for our subject, our organization, and most importantly, our students. Thank you.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you Jennifer. Our second candidate for Middle Level Teacher is Elyse Poller from Connecticut.

Elyse Poller, CT, Candidate for Board of Directors, Middle Level Teacher:

Good afternoon. I am Elyse Poller. I’m a member of the Connecticut Council for the Social Studies and also a middle school social studies teacher in Yukon territory, basketball not dogs. I would be honored to have the opportunity to work on the National Council Board of Directors to further the cause of social studies education.

To tell you just a bit more about me, in addition to my involvement on the Connecticut Board, I presented regularly at state and regional conferences. I am actively involved in our district social studies curriculum council and regularly advocate for a more diverse curricula and for interdisciplinary activities that reinforce the relevance and excitement of social studies. I am an avid supporter of History Day and have been involved in Yukon’s Global Ed Program over the past few years. Global Ed is a simulation similar to Model UN that combines students’ science and social studies knowledge and develops their negotiation and writing skills to address global issues.

I used my position as Student Council Advisor to raise students’ awareness of local and global needs, to develop leadership skills, to help students recognize the challenges and potency of the democratic process, and to instill in them a sense of civic responsibility to the school, the local community and the world.

I would like to work with NCSS to support efforts to have government leaders and the general public recognize that a well rounded social studies education is a cultural necessity and provides an important global perspective for our students. As a middle school teacher I believe social studies has a critical role to play in helping young adolescents to develop their sense of self, at the same time as we reinforce their responsibilities to their peers, their school and the local and global communities. Social studies is an ideal vehicle for the exploration of, of themselves and for their exploration of other people.

As tight budgets force difficult choices, it is critical that NCSS and state councils serve as vocal and visible advocates for social studies education. I don’t think government leaders fully understand the negative impact NCLB has had, ironically, on students’ reading, and writing, and analytical skills, in part due to the loss of time in social studies education. Nor do I think government leaders fully recognize the importance of a broad and challenging social studies education in preparing future global citizens. NCSS can lead by providing lobbying efforts as well as pedagogical, logistical, and moral support to teachers who are trying to keep their programs rich and full.

And while that is all going on, we each much continue to lead by example and spark our students’ fascination with history, democracy and world events. I would be honored to contribute towards this organization’s efforts in that regard. Thank you.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you Elyse. Our first candidate for the College/University position on the Board is Mark Previte from Pennsylvania.

Mark Previte, PA, Candidate for Board of Directors, College/University:

Good afternoon. My name is Mark and I am a teacher. My career has taken place in two ways. For twenty eight years I was a high school secondary teacher at Northern Cambria High School where I taught numerous courses in United States History, contemporary affairs, sociology. My class took an issue centered approach where my students more or less ran the class discussing issues, taking positions, writing position papers.

During that time I became a Board member with the Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies. Since that time, I left Northern Cambria after twenty eight years and I became a university professor at the Pittsburgh at Johnstown where I have been teaching elementary methods, and secondary methods classes, and supervising student teachers. During the course of that time I was encouraged to run for president elect of the Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies, which I did. And in the Pennsylvania Council our terms last for two years. And so I ran two conferences and now I have completed the first year of my presidency of, of our council.

Many, many people have influenced my career as a teacher. Figuratively, they are standing behind me right now. Many of these people are sitting in this audience or have sat here in the past. They all had a role in where I stand today. Many of you can remember your own teachers who had a role in your development over the years. It was with that encouragement that I have been asked to take a leadership position. And here I stand before you today.

My main goal for running for the Board is to speak for the voices of our rookie pre-service teachers. It is so very important now to plant the seed of what it means to be a professional. And in Pennsylvania we have started a program of organizing student chapters on various campuses around the state to get that process started as soon as possible. We need to speak for their voices. We need to show them what being a professional is all about. And we must start this process as soon as possible.

I encourage all of you, as cooperating teachers, as members of your state organization, as members of NCSS to work with them to encourage them to join and to maintain themselves as a professional in both our state and national councils. And this will be the major goal that I will be working for as a Board member of the National Council for the Social Studies. Thank you very much.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you Mark. Our second candidate for the Board in the College/University position is Lorraine Stewart from Virginia.

Lorraine Stewart, VA, Candidate for Board of Directors, College/University:

Good afternoon. My name is Lorraine Moses Stewart and I am an associate professor of education at Virginia Commonwealth University. I have been teaching there for six years now. And prior to teaching there I was a professor at Wake Forest University in North Carolina for thirteen years. So I’ve had a number of years of experience as a professor. But even better than that to me, my first professional love is teaching. And I was a forth grade teacher for five years in North Carolina. And even as a professor, and I know there are many challenges and expectations regarding research, teaching always is number one for me.

In my methods class it is created in a manner that allows students to grow and develop in a very realistic way to know what teaching social studies is all about. I am, and have been for the past fifteen plus years, an advocate for social studies education. Bridging the gap between what happens in methods classes and what happens in the elementary classroom is one of my number one goals at the university level.

I have been an active member of NCSS since 1994, and an active member in our Virginia organization, as well as the North Carolina organization. It is my goal to continue to be an advocate for social studies education at the university level as well as for classroom teachers. Thank you for your time and support.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you Lorraine. We have one candidate for the K-12 Teacher-At-Large position. That’s Terry Cherry from Texas.

Terry Cherry, TX, Candidate for Board of Directors, K-12 Teacher-At-Large:

Those people who I gave the sacks of balloons, if you haven’t passed them out, would you do so now please?

Often times people ask me why I am involved in NCSS. What can a national organization do for me at the local school? Legitimate, honest questions. And I am sure some of you have heard the same. Not yet. I may have an answer, and it may be as simple as the balloon at your table. I need one person who has the balloon close to them be willing to inflate the balloon. Not yet, but be willing to. Would the person from Colorado delegation, and you guys have done a marvelous job with this conference, and the person from Georgia, and you had a great conference last year, blow up your balloons now please? Just blow them up like this. Hold it. Do not tie a knot. Okay. Hold it up high when you’re ready. And if both of you would let them go please. Thank you.

Now, note both Georgia, and let their balloon go. They both went up with gusto and with noise. Now would everyone else who has a balloon inflate yours at the same way and hold it with your fingers. And then hold them up when you’re ready. And then when I count to three let them go. Everybody ready? One, two, three. Notice that our balloons did exactly what Colorado and Georgia’s did. They went up with gusto and made noise.

If you want to make a change in social studies education, would you want one or two balloons or representation from fifty states and communities and associate groups? I want to share the message of the power of the NCSS balloons with local and state social studies organizations. The teacher who feels alone and no one cares about social studies in their school needs to know the power of the NCSS balloon. The lonely social studies teacher who is fighting to keep social studies in the school curriculum needs to know about NCSS. The message needs to be told of what NCSS does for us. There is power in the National Council for the Social Studies for us. Change for social studies is happening because NCSS is working for us. When that message is told, the power of thousands of balloons will be heard in the nation, in the state legislatures and throughout the communities.

In order to begin that process, I need one more action from you. When you get your ballot, vote. My name is Terry Cherry and I approved this message.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you Terry. And the last category is the At-Large and our first candidate is Diane Hart from California.

Diane Hart, CA, Candidate for Board of Directors, At-Large;

Boy, talk about a tough act to follow. Good afternoon, my name’s Diane Heart and I write textbooks. And my guess is that you, or your students, or your children have at some point in your academic career used one of my books.

When I first ran for the Board of NCSS I had a really clear mission in mind. And that was to bring NCSS from the sidelines to the forefront of what I saw as a growing movement to reclaim the civic mission of schools. With the help of this organization, the BOD, the Board of Directors created the NCSS Task Force for Revitalizing Citizenship Education, which I had the honor to co-chair. And that initiative was successful to the point that today NCSS is the institutional home for the national campaign for the civic mission of schools. So I thank you for kicking that off.

More recently, I co-chaired the 2007 conference in San Diego and have been facilitating the online proposal system. And I know that a lot of you have been working in that system as proposal reviewers, online proposal reviews. And I’m gonna hit you again to work on it this year, because it’s made a big difference in how we put our conferences together. This is a solicitation. I agree.

In seeking another term on the Board, I have another very clear goal in mind. And that’s to help move this organization to long term sustainability. I see this as an enterprise with three main goals. One has been mentioned by many people. And that’s to ensure that the core social studies standards are included in the Common Core State Standards movement, in NAEP assessments and the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind however that goes.

Secondly, I am looking for ways for all of us who care about this organization to become more involved as volunteers in service to our Board and to our dedicated staff.

And the third thing I’d like to pay a lot of attention to is the development of a sustained, long term giving program to help the long term viability of NCSS. No one of us can do all of these things alone. And I’m more than aware of that. So I’ve joined with a number of other committed members to create a new community called Friends of NCSS. And we just got approved by the Board yesterday. I invite you to come and find out more about the Friends at the Community Showcase tomorrow from 1-3. We’re right near the exhibit hall. We’ll be online shortly. So you can look for us there. And I hope some of you will join because it’s another way to serve the needs of NCSS.

I’ve always believed that social studies educators do the most important work in the world. I’ve told you that before. I still believe it. For years NCSS has helped me do that work better. And I think it’s helped many of you do that work better. And all of us working together, I think, can make a difference and keep this organization the premier professional organization for social studies teachers around the world. Thank you.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you Diane. And our final candidate in the At-Large position is Linda Wotan from Nebraska.

Linda Wotan, NE, Candidate for Board of Directors, At-Large:

Good afternoon. I wasn’t quite sure what to say. I know you have our bios and our statements and so forth. So I talked to a wise woman from Wisconsin earlier today. And she said just speak from the heart. So here goes.

I am a Polish kid from the south side of Chicago. I got my first lesson, my first civics lesson as a five year old, stamping sample paper ballots for my precinct captain father. And that was the launch, if you will, of a teaching career. So that’s a little bit of who I am.

Why do I want to do this? I worked with NCSS for a number of years. I’ve served on committees and so forth. And over the years it’s become clear to me that this is my, my professional home base, if you will. This is the organization I care very much about. And I think at this point in my career, I would like to serve in a more dedicated capacity on the Board.

Now, what might I want to do? I have three things I’d like to mention. Again, I’ve got them sketched out somewhat in my, in my bio, in my statement rather. But I’d like to just mention them here. The first one is concern for the successor generation. I came across this term young in my career and, quite frankly, it didn’t mean a whole lot to me. At this point in my career, I get it. It’s very important. It’s very important for any organization to worry about and cultivate that successor generation. And specifically I am talking about pre-service teachers, new teachers and those perhaps mid-career who are new to the teaching profession. How to capture those people, how to energize them, get them in as members and sustain them, I think, is a very important challenge for us.

Another thing I’d like to mention as a future challenge would be the preservation of our historical organizational memory. We have long standing members who have a lot to offer to that successor generation. I guess we might call them our predecessor generation. And how to capture that knowledge and wisdom and have them serve as mentors for our successor generation I think is an important challenge.

And then finally, how do we incorporate technology to perhaps achieve those goals? Thanks to being in a, to working this, at this conference, rather, with an exhibit booth, I was able to send, for my first time, two Tweets. I don’t want to say I’m a latter day ludout, luddite, rather. But I’ve never Tweeted. And I did it. And I kept if within the hundred and forty one characters. And it was fun and it worked. And a lot of people saw those Tweets. So, again, how might technology serve us in meeting our challenges?

And I think she’s about, yeah. Time. Okay. Thank you.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

I’d like to thank all the candidates. I’d also like to say a quick thank you, of course, to Syd Golston and all of the people who worked on the Elections and Nominations Committee. And I’d like to turn it back over to Steve because we managed to kind of forget something rather important so.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thanks Anton. One of the things I was a little remiss in doing before, and it’s appropriate at the end of this part, is to really acknowledge the hard work of the Board of Directors, the current Board of Directors. So would the current Board of Directors please stand so we can see who you are and thank you appropriately for the very hard work that you do for the organization? Thank you very much.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you. At this time we would like to have the candidates for the three HOD committees to assemble over here. That would be Steering, Resolutions, and Assignment. So if you could line up over here we can get you lined up and we’ll have an opportunity to have you introduce yourself to the House.

The introductions will be made via their names for the various committees that they are running for. Those three committees are Steering, Resolutions and Assignment. The candidates will actually walk themselves to this microphone at the front of the House where they will introduce themselves. And what we’d like for you to do is to introduce yourself by your name and the community that you represent. And so for example, I would get up and say my name is Anton Schulzki and I represent the Canada community. So at this point, may we have the candidates for the Steering Committee come forward please?

Joe Ramirez, TX, Candidate for the Steering Committee:

My name is Joe Ramirez and I represent the Texas Council for the Social Studies.

Rick Daniel, KY, Candidate for the Steering Committee:

Good afternoon. I’m Rick Daniel. Represent the Kentucky Council for the Social Studies.

Charles Vaughn, SC, Candidate for the Steering Committee:

I’m Charles Vaughan and I represent the South Carolina Council for the Social Studies.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

May we have the nominees for the Resolutions Committee come forward please?

Jennifer Morgan, WI, Candidate for the Resolutions Committee:

Good afternoon. I am Jennifer Morgan and I represent the Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies.

Kelly Carmichael, VA, Candidate for the Resolutions Committee:

Good afternoon. My name is Kelly Carmichael and I represent the Virginia Consortium and short people everywhere.

Marlo Hendrix, MS, Candidate for the Resolutions Committee:

Hello I’m Marlo Hendrix and I represent the Mississippi Council for the Social Studies.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

And now may we have the nominations for the Assignment Committee?

Mary Davis, Middle States, Candidate for the Assignment Committee:

Good afternoon. I’m Mary Davis and I’m here on behalf of the Middle States Council for the Social Studies.

Steve Hench, Instruction, Candidate for the Assignment Committee:

My name is Steve Hench. I represent the Instruction Community.

Sissy Dowdy, AR, Candidate for the Assignment Committee:

Hello. My name is Sissy Dowdy and I represent the Arkansas Council for the Social Studies.

Meagan Gately, AZ, Candidate for the Assignment Committee:

Hello. My name is Meagan Gately and I represent the Arizona Council for the Social Studies.

Michael Collazo, NY, Candidate for the Assignment Committee:

Good afternoon. My name is Michael Collazo. I represent New York State Council for the Social Studies.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you all nominees. Just a reminder to the House: We will be voting on those officers tomorrow at the beginning of the second session of the House of Delegates. Steve.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

It’s now my pleasure to introduce someone who really doesn’t need much of an introduction. And that is our Executive Director, Susan Griffin.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

I was just instructed, and I follow instructions fairly well, to introduce Brenda Luper who is our Financial Director at NCSS. And she’s going to give the financial report first.

Brenda Luper, NCSS Financial Director:

Thank you Susan. Good afternoon. In your packet you should have a handout, which is a two-sided handout, which gives you an overview of three years of financial statements, audited financial statements, in the case of the year ending June 30, 2010, draft statements for both the statement of activities and the statement of financial position for NCSS.

I want to give you just a little highlight, quickly, of our financial situation at the end of June of 2010. What I have done is created a graph of our revenue sources. As you can see, we have a couple of very large revenue sources and the rest are relatively small revenue sources. So we really count on our membership dues and our convention revenue to support the organization. Next slide.

These are our expenses for the year ending June 30, 2010 also by source. As you can see, membership is a smaller share of expense than it is of revenue. There’s also administrative, convention, publications which make up a large portion of our expenses. Next.

We have all been hit by the recession. NCSS is no exception to that rule. Our annual meeting revenue has been up nine percent over 2009. But our membership dues have been declining steadily since 2008. Our publication sales have taken a real hit since 2008. And I think that’s reflective of the economic situation that we’re in. We had an increase in advertising revenue and an increase in special revenue which includes some grant income.

We have on staff and the Board of Directors worked to cut expenses. We have cut some expenses in our membership division, our conference expenses, our publication expenses. And we have held the line on increases in our management expenses, which includes all of our payroll, payroll taxes, and including unemployment taxes, which, as you may know, have risen dramatically since the recession started.

Our net assets are down a hundred and ten percent since 2008. That means we are currently in negative net assets slightly, a trend we need to reverse. Our revenue has dropped, our expenses have dropped, but not enough to keep up with the drop in revenue. We do have a budget for the year ending June 30, 2011 which will put us back in positive net assets if we meet the budget. We are continuing to work with the Board of Directors to search for new revenues for revenue and new ways to cut our expenses.

Once you’ve looked over your financial statement handout, if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me. My e-mail address is on the NCSS website and I will be at the Reg Desk through the end of conference.

Susan Griffin, NCSS Executive Director:

So as you can see, we have a lot of challenges as a national organization in this particular economic climate. But I do want to talk about some of the highlights that are in the Staff Report. And some of those highlights have been mentioned by Steve, but I’d like to repeat them ‘cause I think it’s important to say that these National Curriculum Standards, a number of, of, of sessions here at the conference highlight the way the National Curriculum Standards can be used for different constituent groups. People who are, are trying to show the connection between literacy and the social studies, people who are in school districts who are trying to put together, map out what a K-12 curriculum would look like. And at the university level how to show methods, how to show students who are going to be in classrooms and also in their career possibly in a supervisory position in a school district what curriculum looks like and how to map that out across the social studies disciplines. So I think it’s a valuable tool for everybody and we’re very proud of it.

Another thing that we’re very excited about is the integration of the database and the website. Many of you in the House of Delegates and around the country have been encouraging NCSS to be more robust in terms of our web presence. And one of the ways that we have done that, and with the continued support of the Board, but also the, the talents and commitment of Tim Daly, we’ve been able to merge the database and the website so that it, it can offer opportunities for online communities. It’s one of the things that people have talked about so far. And we also understand that for people coming into the profession, we have to have a robust web presence. And so we’re, we’re happy about that.

We did have a couple of summer webinars for councils. We’re very sad not to be able to afford to bring everybody together in person, but Anna Post has done a marvelous job of bringing people together virtually.

As Brenda has mentioned, we have membership challenges that continue. I had a very good membership committee meeting yesterday. And a lot of great ideas about how to get a message across about what NCSS professional membership can, can help someone with. We are also looking at ways, as Mark Previte had mentioned in his remarks, about bringing pre-service teachers closer to the organization through campus councils. And there are ways that we can use some of the communities to help support these pre-service teachers. So we’re looking at a lot of, of great ideas in order to strengthen the organization and make us a place where people will be drawn.

I’d also like to talk a bit about efforts that National Council for the Social Studies has made to coalesce the field. In January of this year NCSS and the Civic Mission of Schools convened professional organization that represents civics, economics, geography and history. The Civic Mission of Schools was generous to support those people coming in to represent those organizations and we wanted to have a conversation about whether or not these discipline groups could work together to look at the possibility of creating Common State Standards for social studies.

One of the perceptions from other national organizations, for example the Chief State School Officers, was that our discipline areas did not always work together very well. So we wanted to prove them wrong. And we understood that in order to do that we had to bring people together face to face to talk about the challenges ahead.

And happily these groups came together, sat around a table and with the help of Ted McConnell, who helped us put together the, the briefing papers and Beth Ratway, who facilitated a conversation about how important this work was, and to listen to the National Governors Association and the Chief State School Officers tell us that there were not going to be state standards in separate discipline organizations. They would be social studies standards. So we were able to craft a common definition of social studies from these fourteen organizations.

That definition is social studies is an inter-disciplinary exploration of the social sciences and humanities, including civics, history, economics, geography in order to develop responsible, informed, engaged citizens and to foster civic, global, historical, geographic and economic literacy.

We’re very proud of this definition. We’re also very proud of the NCSS definition. And someone said to me, “Well why can’t we just use that?” Because that’s our definition. And what we were trying to do is coalesce these organizations around the idea that we can work together to get this done.

So time passes. These organizations, National Council for the Social Studies approached a couple of different foundations to see if we could get some start up money to bring together a larger group of people to talk about Common State Standards for social studies. We were unable to find that funding.

But in the meantime conversations were also, parallel conversations were happening with a group called SSACI. Now SSACI stands for Social Studies Assessment Curriculum and Instruction. It’s a collaborative that’s running out of the Chief State School Officers. This is a group of people who are made up of social studies folks at the state education level. So a representative, our CS4 people belong, some of them belong to SSACI. So in a conversation I had with Gene Willhoy when we were at a meeting, and, and I’ve been bringing up social studies state standards every time I saw him. And I finally said, “You know we, we brought this group together. We have a common definition of social studies. We’re ready to forge ahead together, but we’re having trouble getting funding for that to happen.” And he said, “Well, you know, as a matter of fact we have this group SSACI and perhaps there was a way to have that group and your group talk to each other. And so, we’re, had a planning meeting in October, just last month. So these now fifteen state organizations and the fourteen professional organizations started to look at what might happen in Common State Standards for social studies. So it’s a very fragile and initial process. But we’re very pleased about the opportunities that might come from it.

In addition to those organizations, we’ve added a representative of the Council of State Social Studies Specialists (CS4), College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) and the National Social Studies Supervisors Association. Since that first meeting we’ve also included the Association of American Geographers. So we’re trying very hard to be inclusive, to make sure that all the voices that need to be at the table are at the table. I wish I had more to report. I don’t at this point, because we’ve only had our one meeting to, to start framing the process. But I assure you that we’re going to work very hard to push this forward. We’re currently looking for fund. And we are proud to think that as a group of vital organizations and state leaders, that we can do this. As soon as I know anything more, believe me, I’m going to tell you about it.

The last thing I’m going to comment on is, is not in the PowerPoint but it’s, it’s something that I know concerns all of you. And that is, in this conversation about education reform we’ve been hearing a lot about career and college preparation. Well we’re circulating, through the Civic Mission of Schools, a petition that will re-frame it so that we have college, career, and citizenship. But we’re going to put citizenship first. So I hope that, that in some of the meetings that you, you see, you’ll be seeing petitions. We have petitions in the Exhibit area and I encourage you to get on board with this advocacy effort. We’ve been a bit disappointed about, because you know as the Congress was looking at the reauthorization a year ago May, they were talking about college, career and citizenship and then all of a sudden citizenship dropped off the radar. Just as in the Gates Foundation, they were doing public service announcements that included college, career, and citizenship. And then citizenship dropped off. Well we have to get it back. And there’s nobody better to do it than social studies teachers. So please look for those petitions and sign them. Thanks very much.

One of the ways that we’re trying to turn membership around is to encourage people to bring their colleagues, their cooperating student teachers and their methods, the, the methods professors to bring their students in. And so these people have been recruiting members one on one, Each One Reach One. Now in addition to strengthening the organization, there’s another slight advantage to recruiting members on behalf of NCSS and that is that each time your name is put into the hat for each person that you recruit, you, there’s the possibility that you might be the winner of two tickets anywhere in the U.S. This year that person was Mark Previte. So I want to thank every person who recruited someone on behalf of NCSS. But we have to be the ones who explain the value of professional organizations. And we have to explain the value of having greater numbers to have a bigger voice to speak on behalf of the profession. So I want to encourage you to get your name up there.

Okay. Now we’re going to talk about Gold and Silver Star Councils. We’re pretty excited this year for a lot of reasons, to be here in Denver with all you great people. But also this is the first year in a long time that we’ve had more Gold Star Councils than Silver Star. So we’re proud of the, very proud of the Silver Star Councils. We’re very proud of the Gold Star Councils ‘cause we’ve made it even harder to do either. Oh, and we’re going to have a photo opportunity with the President after this so that you can have him actually, in all his glory, give you the certificate.

Silver Star Councils: Arizona Council for the Social Studies. Arizona. Hey. Thank you for your hard work. Florida Council for the Social Studies. And I know that Florida just had a very successful conference. So congratulations. Prince Georges County, MD Council for the Social Studies. That’s in Maryland. Okay. And finally Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations. Sally Joe I think I’ve seen you up here before.

Gold Council criteria. Everyone is required to meet seven of eight criteria. All right first on our list: The Association of Teachers of the Social Studies/United Federation of Teachers, New York. Congratulations and thank you. Colorado Council for the Social Studies, our wonderful hosts. Thank you so much. Speaking of hosts, our hosts from last year, Georgia Council for the Social Studies, Gold Star. Congratulations. Kentucky Council for the Social Studies is a Gold Star. Congratulations Kentucky. North Carolina Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations. Oklahoma Council for the Social Studies, again. Congratulations. Gold Star. That’s a nice looking vest you have. Limited edition, good. Oregon Council for the Social Studies. Congratulations. Well done. Tennessee Council for the Social Studies. You are wonderful. Congratulations. Without your good work we would not be the strong organization we are. So thank you very much for your efforts.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Again just a reminder, those Gold and Silver Star winners, please make sure you join us up here to take, to have pictures taken with President Steve Goldberg.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Well this is great. We’ve come in early. I want to, couple of reminders: tomorrow second session of HOD will begin promptly at 8:00am. There will be coffee service, but no other, no snacks. So if you are hungry make sure you secure food before you arrive. The voting will take place tomorrow at 8:20 sharp. That’s voting for the various committees that we heard the candidates. Clickers will be distributed to the credentialed delegates up to this time. I know that’s kind of the highlight. Everybody loves those. You must submit your delegate certification to a Steering Committee member in order to receive a clicker. Be sure to allow time to be credentialed prior to the beginning of the HOD session. There is reference in the Manual for elections and we will review those tomorrow. Another reminder that the, this year for the very first time we’re combining the Presidential Reception and the Teacher of the Year Awards. So we invite you all over to the ballroom at the Hyatt as 6:45 for our new feature combining President’s Reception and the Teacher of the Year Awards. So we hope we’ll see all of you there.

And I guess at this point, are there any other announcements? I don’t think so. At which point, I entertain a motion to adjourn. So moved. Second? All in favor?

Speakers:

Aye.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Opposed? See you tomorrow.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

We’d like to begin the House in just about two minutes. So if you could find your way to your chairs, make sure you have your clickers. And we’ll get started here in about two minutes please. Thank you.

A quick reminder to the delegates of the House: You need to be sure that you turn your clicker in at the table prior to you leaving the room. We need to keep track of the clickers. So please if you have to leave the room for any reason whatsoever, even if it is just for a moment, please go ahead and turn it in. Ladies and gentlemen of the House. May I have your attention please? Again, just a quick reminder that if you do need to leave the room for any reason whatsoever, please make sure that you turn your clicker in at the table in the back. You can retrieve it when you come back in. But we need to keep track of the clickers that way. We’ll get started here in just one moment.

If those at the side could take their seats please. Those at the sides in the back, we’d like for you to take your seats so we can begin.

Good morning ladies and gentlemen. Before we start I have a quick announcement. There were two individuals who came in early this morning to the House who did not check in with the Credentials Committee at the front. And therefore you’re not actually logged in and you will not be able to vote. So if you have not checked in and do not have your names checked off at the Credentials table, there is two of you, and I’m sorry we don’t know who you are because we didn’t quite figure this out, you need to go to the back and get your name checked off.


While that occurs, it is my pleasure to open up the second session of the House of Delegates, the 54th House of Delegates, and to lead us, our President Steve Goldberg.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Good morning everyone. I’d like to call Debby Kliche who will lead us in the pledge.

Debby Kliche, CO:

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible with liberty and justice for all.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Good morning again. Hope everyone had a good evening last night. We’re going to begin. I just want to remind everyone that to make sure by the end of today’s session, you turn in your open ended comments on the evaluation form. It’s very helpful for the HOD Steering Committee to use those to improve procedures for next year, as well as. Evaluations will be facilitated using the clickers for survey questions. And the evaluation forms are the yellow, the yellow paper in the HOD packet. Excuse me. I now going to call on Terry Trimble from FASSE to give a brief FASSE report.

Terry Trimble, FL, Chair, FASSE:

Thank you Steve. First of all I would like to thank all of those of you who’ve been donating to FASSE over the past year and particularly those state councils that contributed from their council funds for FASSE. FASSE, to me in my mind, represents a flagship program for the Florida, for the National Council for the Social Studies. If we don’t believe in ourselves, if we’re not prepared to invest in ourselves, how can we ask other people to invest? How can we ask them to partner with us, when we’re not prepared to step forward and make our own contributions? FASSE has had, traditionally, the McAuliffe Award. It has had the CUFA FASSE Award, most recently, the International Assembly FASSE Award. And we’re constantly looking for partnerships with any other community or organization within or without of NCSS to partner with to provide opportunities for funding, for innovative projects to support worthwhile growth and advancement in social studies education.

Unfortunately in recent years interest in FASSE appears to be declining. Last year we only had one candidate for office. This year we have no candidates for office. This is an outstanding program. It is a program we need to be able to point to and say, “We believe in FASSE. FASSE is a main source that we can use to invest, and grow, and support ourselves.” So step forward individually, step forward as a council. Do everything you can and to regard a) in trying to gain support for FASSE from any funding source that you may know. And number two, make sure everybody within your bailiwick is aware of the FASSE grant programs because we usually only get about ten to twelve applicants. And they’re not that hard to do. So please encourage anyone that has a good idea that’s worth funding to submit an application for a FASSE grant. Timeline is quick, simple process. And we want to create good ideas.

If you had an opportunity to hear the FASSE presentation yesterday. A Growth of an Idea in California is spreading throughout the Los Angeles school district. That’s the kind of thing that we want to see. And tonight you’ll see several FASSE grant award winners being recognized. Hope you’ll be there tonight. Hope you’ll do something in your local area to contribute to FASSE. And I hope that some of you will consider joining the FASSE Board sometime in the future. Thank you very much. Make this the flagship program you believe in yourself. You believe in FASSE. Thank you.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you Terry. We’re going to give a couple of minutes as some of the stragglers begin to come in.

But what we want to do right now is introduce everyone, once again, to the process of our voting, both for candidates as well as for the resolutions. We’ll, of course, be using the electronic clickers that you picked up on the way in. And to help us, remind us how to do this one more time, I am pleased to introduce Dan Larsen from E-Instruction, who will guide us through a brief tutorial before we actually commence voting. So Dan Larsen.

Dan Larsen, E-Instruction:

Good morning everyone. Again, I’m Dan Larsen from E-Instruction. What I’d like to do is teach you, if you’ve, not familiar with this technology, I’m going to give you a little tutorial on how to use it. First of all, just kind of the lay of the land, if you look at the top, you have a prompt screen. When it’s turned on, you’ll see data on there. When it’s off, it’s blank. Down at the very bottom, you’ll notice your power button to turn it on and off. And don’t bother turning it on yet because I have, there is some programming instructions you’ll have to go through. Okay.

When you’re, when you’re sending response it’s important that you use the Send key, which is this right angled arrow. In terms of responses, if you look at the keys, you’ll notice one and A are synonymous. So if you have five choices and it asks you for a one or an A, it’s the same key. If it’s a, a, if you want to send a B or a two, it’s always that same key. So whether it’s one, two, three, four, five or an A, B, C, D, E, it will be the same key.

Now, when you, when you first turn the pads on, of course you use the power button, you’re going to need to watch the screen because some of these pads respond a little differently. And I’m not really, if you turn them on right now it will, the. Everybody, go ahead and power them on right now because you’ll be able to do part of this. Those of you, if you look at your screen prompt. If you see an “SID:” just press the Send key once, and you’ll see it responding. And when you see the SID again, just repeat it and press the Send button again. Now, it may ask you to join. And it won’t join right now because I don’t have the software running. But I’m going to go ahead in a minute and get the software going to where you complete this. But what I’d like you to remember, if, if it prompts you to join, all you do is you enter a twenty one and press the Send key. And when your screen prompt equals “Q:” that means you’re ready to vote.

Now procedurally, from what I understand is going to happen today, there may be some time between the voting for delegates and the voting on the resolutions. If there is enough of a time, these, these pads will shut them self off. So when we’re ready to vote on resolutions, what you’ll need to do is power it back on and follow this same procedure. And if I need to I can display this again and leave it up on the board to make sure everybody gets connected.

And again, when we, at the end of the program, when we’re doing the evaluations, you’ll probably have to go through that again. But again keep in mind, some of these clickers will come on and go right straight to the Q, and which means they are ready to vote.

So I don’t know procedurally, if any of you are having trouble with your clicker and you’re not on the Q: when it’s time to vote. Anton, do you want people to maybe raise their hands if they need help or? Because, you know, for the sake of voting we want everybody to be able to vote.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Okay. What we’re going to do at this time now before we introduce John Hollins and the Credentials Committee, we’re going to do a quick test of the system to make sure that both your clickers are powered on and that you’re using them correctly. So, this is just a practice for voting on resolutions. You’ll note that the choices are: one is For, two is Against, and three is Abstain. So at this time would you just take a moment and vote for the proposed resolution? And just, just another point of how to use: While the question is active, you can always resend your vote or change your vote if you’re not sure that you voted the way you wanted to vote. So feel free to, if you want to resend it, it won’t vote twice. It’ll only record you last vote. So, but you do have a couple of chances to resend.

So what it looks like to me that it’s identified if you voted For, you’re green. If you voted Against, you’re red. If you’ve Abstained, I think you may be yellow. And if you haven’t voted, it’s probably blue. See I don’t know if that’s reliable or not. I don’t know if that feedback. I’m thinking that’s what it says. I don’t know if that’s a reliable answer. When I close it, we’ll see the distribution. It looks like there’s a lot more people that are voting For. What’s your clicker number? Okay. So you’re saying you voted Against. And, and see I don’t know, I don’t know the answer to that. That’s why this feedback grid is more confusing than it’s helpful.

We’re going to do one more practice vote. One of the things we’re going to do to try to work out some of the problems is we’re going to do one more practice vote. So we’ll get an opportunity to iron out, make sure that when you vote you’re voting for what you say you voted for. And then we can kind of clean things up. So hang on just a second. Just one moment please.

We, we appreciate you patience. If I could have the House’s attention. What will help us as this point, and I understand that technologies are what they are and sometimes we just kind of have to deal with the problems as we go. Here’s what I’d like to do at this point: If you’ve voted in that last little test ballot No, would you just kindly raise your hands. We just want to make sure we have an accurate count. And keep your hands raised while we do a quick count please. Thank you, you may put your hands down.

We’re going to try this out one more time to work out the kinks and then we’re going to do another practice vote. So at this point in time, on the resolution BE IT RESOLVED one is For, two is Against, three is Abstained. Please take a moment and go ahead and vote.

Okay, we’re going to do one more practice vote. We’ll hold it. We’ll hold it until we get the results that we need. Again, please make sure you’re pushing the right buttons. And again, if you’re having some problems, raise your hand. We’ll get there soon as we can. Can we wait until we do another practice vote please? Okay. Hang on just one second. Okay. In this particular case, since this will be a quick mock up for the election for the officers for the House, at this point in time, you’re asked to choose two of the three names that are up there. Okay. Please choose two of the three names that are up there. And make sure, and make sure that what you do is you push one, two and then hit Send or two three and then hit Send. Okay? It’s okay you have the opportunity to get it, to redo it. So push the two numbers that you wish to vote for and then hit Send.

When you look at the grid to see if had voted or not, remember that the number that you’re looking for is the number on the very top of your clicker. That is the one that indicates the device that you have sent. Okay?

To test our system one last time, here’s what we’d like everyone to do. We’re going to have you revote, however, however, we need everyone to vote one and two this time around. Everyone please vote one and two and then Send/Enter. Okay? One and two and then Send/Enter. And don’t worry about what it shows up on the screen because we need to make sure that we’re getting our votes tabulated correctly. So one and two and then Enter.

Would the individual who has clicker one four one at the top of it, would you please re-enter and Send. That’s one four one. That’s the sticker at the top.

Thank you ladies and gentlemen. We, again, appreciate your patience as we worked through it. It looked as if that last vote helped clarify what we were looking for. Again, when we get to the actual voting, if there are any problems we’ll attempt to deal with it as best we can in a timely fashion. But we’d appreciate you indulgence as well.

At this time, ladies and gentlemen, it’s my pleasure to introduce the chair of the Credentials Committee, Joan Hollins, of the Colorado Council who will give us a Credentials Report.

Joan Hollins, Chair, Credentials Committee, CO:

Good morning. As chair of the Credentials Committee, I am pleased to report that we have a hundred and fifty six delegates that are registered and certified to vote in the House of Delegates as of 8:20 this morning, Saturday, November 13, 2010. And I move the adoption of the Credentials Report. I hear a second? So moved. Thank you.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Okay. We’re now going to move to the actual election process for the members of the Steering, Nominations and Assignment Committee. Just a reminder that those people who were introduced last night, I do need to make one clarification. There was a, a small paper error on the, on behalf of the Steering Committee and there is an additional candidate who didn’t have the opportunity to introduce herself yesterday to the House. That individual is Cheryl Rehome of California, who is going to be a nominee for the Nominations Committee.

Nominations and qualification information are on sheets on your table. I’m sorry Nominations. It was Resolutions. Again nominee information and qualifications are available on the tables for you to take a look at. Ballots for each of the HOD committees will be projected on the screen and will be read aloud. Candidates, we’re going to ask you to please stand where you are when your name is read on the ballot. Voting will be conducted via the electronic ballot for each committee after the presentation of the ballot, as per the HOD Manual. The electronic voting will be facilitated using the clickers. You’ll be voting for two nominees for each of the, for each of the committees: Steering, Resolutions and Assignment Committees. Results will be tabulated as quick as we can and we’ll make the announcements then as soon as we are able to.

At this time, we’re going to begin the election process for the HOD committees. At this time, we have the nominees for the Steering Committee. Please stand. William Rick Daniel of the Kentucky Council, Joe Ramirez of the Texas Council, and Charles Vaughan of the South Carolina Council. Thank you.

At this time, the voting is now open. Please make your selection using your clickers. Please vote for two candidates and then hit Enter. Please vote for two candidates and then hit Enter. You have thirty seconds to vote. All the votes, all the votes have been tabulated. We had, we had all one hundred and sixty one votes were tabulated. Congratulations to William Rick Daniel and to Charles Vaughan, members of the Steering Committee.

Nominations for Resolutions. Kelly Carmichael, Virginia Consortium. Marlo Hendrix, Mississippi Council. Jennifer Morgan, Wisconsin Council, and Cheryl Rehome, California Council. At this time, please vote for two. Thank you. You have thirty seconds to complete your vote. Congratulations to Jennifer Morgan and Cheryl Rehome.

The nominations for the Assignment Committee. If you would please stand. Michael Collazo, New York State Council. Mary Davis, Middle States. Chris Dowdy, Arkansas. Meagan Gately, Arizona and Steve Hench, Instruction. Apologize. At this time would you please vote for two? Vote for two. You have thirty seconds to complete your vote. Congratulations Mary Davis and Meagan Gately.

Those members who were now elected to their various committees, please note, there will be a brief meeting after the HOD session in the front to meet the remaining members of your committees.

At this point in time we are now going to discuss the NCSS 2010 resolutions. For that I would like to again introduce Bob Dytell, Chair of the Resolutions Committee and President Steve Goldberg.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Good morning everybody. We have six resolutions that we need to vote on and we are going to put them up on there. Okay, we’re, I think we’re going to put the first resolution on now. I’m just going to read the resolution number and the BE IT RESOLVED.

Resolution 10-1-1: Promoting Citizenship Through Philanthropy.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS continue to promote a more friendly planet through, more friendly conference through going green;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that NCSS continue to set an example of expectations for conference giveaways for state and local councils;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED NCSS should incorporate philanthropic giveaways within the construct of the NCSS conference, i.e. promoting sustainable development, going green, paying it forward, see the Wisconsin conference giveaways. These philanthropic giveaways can and should be a reflection of the humanitarian nature promoted by the educational leadership of the NCSS Board of Directors, membership and standards we teach to our student body. The funds raised for the giveaways should support the main cause, i.e. people at a level of no lower than eighty percent.

We have a ten minute time limit to discuss the resolution. Those of you who are for it, the front microphone. Those of you who are against the resolution, the back, the back microphone.

Female speaker:

Mr. Chairman. I just.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Please state your name.

Tracy Dussia, VA:

My name is Tracy Dussia from the Virginia Council. I am, needing some clarification about what you mean. I have no idea what you mean by a giveaway. And maybe if I knew what that was, and the intent of. Is this to just be sustainably green? Or is this to raise money? Or is it together? I would be much easier, it would be easier for me to make a decision.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

I think you’re going to get an answer now. Wisconsin please state your name.

Melissa Collum, WI:

Melissa Collum, Wisconsin Council national delegate. What we mean by the giveaways are the example of the bag that you get when you come in to the national meeting. These are the bags that Wisconsin gives away. They cost five dollars for Wisconsin to purchase. The five dollars goes directly to the group that sews them in Rwanda. It supports one woman to stay in sewing school for a month. All her supplies, all her teaching, so on and so forth. The front of the bag is traditional Katinega [Katanga?] fabric. The back of the bag is able to be printed with our sponsors, our sponsor’s logo and also our logo. It’s our intention that when NCSS have something that it’s giving away like that, that C-SPAN is going to purchase for us, that we are going to promote as a giveaway that we take back, that we look at being philanthropic rather than excuse me, promoting a book publisher or something like that. I think that we, as a social studies organization, need to look at being philanthropic and teaching our students to be philanthropic and also looking global. All right. Does that answer your question? Does anyone want to see these?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Just one second. Those, speakers should speak for two, no longer than two minutes and you could come and speak again after everybody has had a chance within the ten minute framework.

Peggy Altoff, CO:

Hi. Peggy Altoff from Colorado. I guess I have two concerns. First of all, who is going to be the judge of the eighty percent? That’s one thing. And I’m, I’m totally for going green. Second, can NCSS really police our sponsors? I think we could ask whoever is doing the bags to purchase them. But suppose they say no? Do we turn down a sponsor because they haven’t decided to go as green as we would like them to be? So I think this is a goal, but I’m just concerned about, after stuffing bags for three hours the other afternoon, and, you know, is the host council going to throw out, you know, four thousand brochures because they aren’t green, or because they don’t reach the eighty percent mark, and perhaps thus deprive our members of something that may be of benefit to them? That’s my concern.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

You’ve got to wait Melissa because if there’s anybody else who wants to speak for it, they need to speak first. Seeing no one else who wants to speak for it? Melissa.

Melissa Collum, WI:

Thank you Peggy. The issue is, the issue of purchasing and finding who we are going to find a bag or anything else that is our conference giveaway would go to the conference chair. And they would work with whomever the sponsor is. It’s not a set in stone. When we pass a resolution, it’s a guide to NCSS. It’s not something that is set in stone. It’s a way for us to look forward, be forward and be an example to our councils. No we’re not saying throw something away that isn’t green. We’re saying be philanthropic in what we are doing and try to instill in our classrooms the idea of global citizenship.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

State your name and council.

Lynn Galvin, AZ:

Lynn Galvin, Arizona. Do I understand correctly that a sponsor purchases the bags? Is that the way it is?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Yes.

Lynn Galvin, AZ:

Okay, because my, if we were purchasing it, I would want to know cost comparisons also. But I’m not sure you can require someone to purchase specific items when they’re paying for it.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Anybody else for? Anybody else wants to come up and speak for?

Gayle Thieman, International Assembly, OR:

Gayle Thieman, and I’m representing the International Assembly as a delegate, but I’m from Portland, Oregon. I think it may be easier for NCSS to encourage sponsors to give us literature on recycled paper than it would be for NCSS to ask the sponsor of the bags to, to choose a vendor as was represented. I think the, the, the bags that support women in developing countries or the eighty percent is a wonderful idea. But I think very much the sponsor would say, “We’re sorry. We can provide four thousand bags. The cost to us is x amount. If you want us to provide the bags that cost five dollars, we’ll have to pass that on to NCSS.” Which means they’d have to pass it on to all of us in our registration fee. So my question to the House is, would you be willing for your registration fees to be increased four or five dollars so we could have these sustainable bags?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Could you face, face this way and turn the mic around. Thank you and then introduce yourself.

Jennifer Morgan, WI:

Jennifer Morgan, Wisconsin Council. I want to reiterate what Melissa said. This is just a guideline. We’d like to suggest that we consider this. It’s not set in stone that we require this of our vendors. I think you might be surprised when you talk to vendors about giving philanthropically and their willingness to do so. We had amazing response when we gave out these bags in Wisconsin. And there are people who are looking to give back, not just make money.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Any other speakers? Please introduce yourself.

Iris Moretti, International Assembly:

Iris Moretti from the International Assembly. I don’t see a problem with this. We had an international conference in Australia about four years ago and our bags were constructed by recently arrived refugees. So I, I think it’s an excellent idea.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We have about a minute left in the bank. Is there anybody else who wants to come up and say anything for or against?

Robin De Hollander, NY:

My name is Robin De Hollander. I represent New York State Council. And I just want to remind everyone in the wording it says “should.” It does not say “must.”

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Anybody else? Seeing there is no one else. Make a motion to vote on it. You need your clickers. For would be one, Against would be two. If you Abstain, it would be three. You can vote now. Go ahead.

Female speaker:

I would, I would appreciate if the colors were not up on the screen because I do think it influences votes. Now, but they were previously. Thank you.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

The motion passed. Resolution passed.

Female speaker:

I’m sorry. If the green and red was supposed to be showing for and against, it was incorrect.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

No, the green and red doesn’t mean anything.

Female speaker:

Thank you.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

You’re welcome.

Resolution 10-2-1: Advocating for Social Studies in State Standards and Common Core Standards.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS encourage states and advocate within states that social studies be included in their Common State Standards;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that NCSS help affiliated and associated groups by preparing materials to help them encourage and advocate for the inclusion of social studies in the Common State Standards of their Respective States;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that NCSS work with the U.S. Department of Education and members of the United States Congress to encourage and advocate the inclusion of social studies in Common Core State Standards.

Ten minutes for this resolution. Those who are for it are front. Those who are against in the rear. We start with the for.

Don Imler, PA:

I, I have comment first and I think it’s a point of order. We have started this morning with being told that that red and green did mean something. And my vote was a no, came up green. I changed it back again to a no. It came up red. So it is clearly a point of order that we have been mis-instructed. And with such and the trouble that we seem to be having with the clickers this morning, even though I’ve been here all the years we’ve used clickers and we’ve had wonderful response with them, I think we need to, at the very least, step backwards and call for a vote by voice on the last resolution. Because it was confusing. It was wrong. And we have been mis-instructed.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

The only way that this can happen is if there is a motion made from the floor. Seconded, for a revote on the last vote. That’s the only way we can get this done. That was not a motion. A motion was not made.

Don Imler, PA:

Second point of order. The motion did come from the floor. But I will gladly make the motion from here.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Please do.

Don Imler, PA:

That we make a last, pull the clicker vote and make the last vote by voice.

Female Speakers:

I second that motion.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

We have a second.

Female speaker:

Second. I seconded the motion.

Don Imler, PA:

Excuse me. For the record my name is Don Imler, Pennsylvania Council.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you.

Marjorie Hunter, AR:

Marjorie Hunter from Arkansas seconds the motion. Did, did everybody hear me that time? I feel like Verizon.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

All right. So the procedure we’re going to follow now, the vote is to rescind the previous resolution vote and to redo that now by voice vote. So we must first vote on the motion to rescind the previous and then recast it as a, a voice vote. Right. All of those in favor of the, the motion to rescind the previous vote and to re-vote by voice, signify by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Opposed say no.

Speakers:

No.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Yes. Okay the ayes have it. So we are going to re-vote now on the previous resolution by voice vote. Which, just to remind you, the previous revolution was:

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS continue to promote a more planet friendly conference through going green. All right and it’s back. And so does anyone need to go through all the stipulations of that resolution? I think we’ve had discussion on it. So we will now have a voice vote. All those in favor of the resolution to promote a more planet friendly conference through going green signify by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Those who feel that we should, those against, signify by saying nay.

Speakers:

Nay.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

We cannot tell. So we are going to now have to do it by a counted vote. And I think we’ll do that by. Okay, we’re going to do. Okay we’re going to do this by counting. And the way we’re going to do, I think, easily. If you are in favor of the resolution, please signify by standing up. And we will have to have. Who’s going to count? Steering Committee will count.

Female speaker:

No, they need to say. When they count, they need to. When, when that person has been counted they need to sit down.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

When you’ve been counted please sit down and make sure that the, you are voiced. Okay. Okay. Those who are voting nay please stand and remain standing until you have been counted. Okay, the results, those in favor of the resolution were seventy six. Those opposed to the resolution were sixty eight. The resolution is passed. Okay, thank you very much for your patience with this.

We have now, we think clarified the situation by removing colors from the grid, from the PowerPoint. What we’re trying to see is the. The problem with the colors that come up on the grid with the numbers is that if you click it more than once. If you change it, that may be the indication. Those colors have nothing to do with whether you are going for or against. It’s simply a internally programmed thing. We think, if we. If it comes up again that’s the explanation. That has nothing to do with the way you are voting. Okay. So now we. And by the way, the numbers were exactly the same. So, no one changed their vote on that.

Okay. So now we’re going to go on to Resolution 10-1-1. No go on to the next one.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Next resolution is 10-2-1. It’s up there. We’re already read it. So those who are for it, please front mic. Against it, back mic. Please introduce yourself.

Ray Wicks, MO:

Ray Wicks, Missouri Council for the Social Studies. Given the difficulty we’re having with the electronic voting and the questions that are being raised about the accuracy of it, I move that we abandon electronic voting for the remainder of the resolutions.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Is there a second?

Female speaker:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

There is a second. Yes?

Female speaker:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, we have a second. It’s been moved and seconded to abandon electronic voting for the remainder of this session.

Let’s try a voice vote. Those. Discussion. It’s your time.

Gayle Thieman, Portland, OR:

Gayle Thieman, Portland State University. I think there was some real misconceptions about what the colors meant and I, I have been told that you turned off that function that shows how we vote. But we haven’t, that hasn’t been explained to us. So I think the concern is not that we don’t like using clickers. It’s just that what happened this time in HOD is unlike any previous year. We’ve never had colors that showed voting.

Lois Wolff, GA:

Lois Wolff, Georgia. In the past it is correct that we haven’t had these issues. It took me three times to see that mine registered. We were just told in our, to the House that all the votes remained the same. Although, it didn’t, there were some people that abstained the second time. So the numbers could not have remained the same.

Ray Wicks, MO:

Ray Wicks, Missouri Council. My first clicker this morning during the practice did not record on the screen. I turned it in, I was given a second clicker. And during the first actual votes it did not record on the screen.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you.

Jeff Passe, CUFA:

Jeff Passe, Jeff Passe, representative from College and University Faculty. If it happens, and it often does, that we get into an amendment, and an amendment to the amendment, and an amendment to the amendment to the amendment. You’re not going to want to have voice votes and divisions of the House and you’ll be very thankful that you have the clickers.

Ruth Luevanos, CA:

Ruth Luevanos, Southern California Council. Given that the, the manual, the auditory vote that we had matched the vote that we had on the clickers, I think that proves the validity of the electronic clickers. So I think that we should just continue with the electronic voting.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you. Is there any other discussion?

Tracy Dussia, VA:

Well just to add my own voice. Tracy Dussia from Virginia. There are very few times in the history of this organization, this HOD, that there’s been, you know, a one vote difference. And I believe that the electronic voting is accurate and it will reflect the consensus of this body. I like the speed with which the votes are tallied. And I encourage you not to be afraid just because we had a little bit of a rough start. I think this is going to work if we stick with it and, and, and stay with that learning curve.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you.

Tina Ellsworth, MO:

Tina Ellsworth, Missouri Council. I think that if even one vote cannot be cast correctly then it’s unfair to the entire body given that it can happen to any member throughout the duration of the meeting.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you. Is there any further discussion? The motion before the House is to abandon the use of the clickers for future votes. We’ll take a voice vote. All those in favor of the motion, signify by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

All those opposed say nay.

Speakers:

Nay.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

In the opinion of the chair, the nays have it and we’ll continue to use the clickers.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We’re going back to 10-2-1. I was remiss in reading, should read off the sponsors for that resolution. It’s ATSS/UFT, New York State Council for the Social Studies, Wisconsin. Co-sponsors: Connecticut Council for the Social Studies, NCSS Assessment Community. Carolyn.

Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT, New York City, New York State:

Can you hear me ‘cause this is a little high for me. Okay. The purpose of this resolution is to help NCSS see that social studies is taught in all the states and grade levels. It started in the summer webinar that NCSS ran. I happened to be in Seattle at the time for the AFT convention. And I saw a similar resolution there and I said I would start off by using their language. And then I tweaked it a lot to come up with this. The AFT expects the disciplines to semi-plagiarize what they wrote. And it has since gone through the executive board of ATSS/UFT in New York City and the New York State Council for the Social Studies where it got tweaked some more. Then it went through another webinar at NCSS where it got tweaked again. And it went through some more tweaking yesterday in the Resolutions Committee. And we’ve hope we’ve tweaked it appropriately so that all the language matches what it’s supposed to be. You should be aware, the Common Core Standards is national, is national and that refers to English, Language Arts and math. And when we talk about the state social studies standards, the common state social studies standards, they’re going to be state by state. And that’s why you see the difference in the two things. So I’m for this and I want you to vote for it.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Gentleman in the back. Please state your name.

Beth Ratway, WI:

I’m a lady. I’m a lady last time. [inaudible]

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Lady in the back, sorry.

Beth Ratway, WI:

No worries, I got my hair cut. It’s okay.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

My eyes are failing me. I’m getting old. I’m sorry.

Beth Ratway, WI:

It doesn’t count on my two minutes does it? All right. Beth Ratway from Wisconsin. Sorry. I just need to do some points of clarification for you. The common core, currently, the Common Core State Standards, are a state led effort. It’s not federal, it’s not specifically supported by DOE except through funding. They do not use that verbiage in Race to the Top. They say, you know, come together to develop standards. So the Common Core State Standards is a CCSSO/NGA effort. And it only includes ELA, (sorry, I only have two minutes). It only includes ELA and mathematics. And there’s a reason. And they want to focus on implementation of those two. So that’s separate. So the social studies work can’t be called common core.

And, particularly with the third bullet. The USDOE and the, and the legislatures and Congress are not and cannot be involved in the effort because it needs to be state led. If you understand how standards are currently adopted. States in particularly need to be at the table and leading the effort in order for it to go through the states. So it has to be really clear that it’s state led and it’s not, they are not national standards even though we all think they are. But, it has to be state led, a state led effort, and we are not working with the DOE and Congress because they, CCSSO and NGA aren’t looking for their support right now. So just clarification. And if you have questions, just ask. I’m steeped in working with CCSSO on this.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Anybody speaking for, against, for, for, against? Nobody for? Okay. Please introduce yourself. Go ahead.

Mert Martens, OK and Michelle Herczog, CA:

Oh, I’m Mert Martens from Oklahoma and Michelle Herczog from California and our two states would like to offer a friendly amendment. We would like the word [inaudible].

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

There is no such thing as a friendly amendment. It’s an amendment and then we will have to deal with the amendment first. Am I correct?

Mert Martens, OK and Michelle Herczog, CA:

But we’re friendly. Yeah we are friendly. We’d like, we’d like to strike.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

It’s an amendment.

Mert Martens, OK and Michelle Herczog, CA:

Okay, then we move to strike the word “core” everywhere that it is in the, in the resolution. And we would like to strike “be it further resolved that NCSS work the U.S. Department of Education and members of Congress” because they are not funding it right now.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

You, let’s, you have two amendments that you have just put down. So we can only deal with one amendment. So let’s deal with one at a time. State the amendment.

Mert Martens, OK and Michelle Herczog, CA:

We would like to, we would move that we strike the word “core” from Resolution 10-2-1.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay.

Mert Martens, OK and Michelle Herczog, CA:

Everywhere that it is.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Everywhere it is?

Mert Martens, OK and Michelle Herczog, CA:

M-m-m [yes].

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Okay, so after clarification, the amendment is to strike the word “core” in all instances in that resolution. Is there a second for this amendment? It’s been moved and seconded. We have discussion now. For the amendment, please come up to the front. Thank you and just state your name and.

Kelly Curtright, CS4, OK:

Kelly Curtright, CS4 delegate from Oklahoma. What Beth was clarifying is that Common Core does not want anything to do with social studies. And so SSACI and the Steering Committee and others have decided that since they don’t want to deal with us, that we will call our standards Common State Standards for Social Studies. And so we want the resolution to reflect that decision.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Against the amendment. Anybody else for the amendment? Is somebody standing up to speak? Okay.

Ollie Fields Thacker, NY:

Good morning. Ollie Fields Thacker, ATSS/UFT, New York City. Just a point of clarification: I think that with the language of these core standards, it is not, as the lady from Wisconsin mentioned, it is not a federal mandate but it is a national movement. And I think sometimes many of us can get the confusion between national and federal. It’s a national movement that’s been initiated by NGA, the National Governors Association in reference to the state education departments. Thank you.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Gayle.

Gayle Thieman, Portland, International Assembly, OR:

Gayle Thieman, a delegate from the International Assembly. How we understand this national movement is with the words “common core.” And as you read the rest of the resolution, it does ask the National Council for the Social Studies to have some involvement, and we’re not speaking to the resolution about advocating in Congress. But if we want people to know what we’re talking about, if we want social studies included in the common core, then the resolution needs to use the words “common core” so people know what we’re talking about. So I am against this resolution.

Female speaker:

Common core only refers to ELA and Math.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We have less than two minutes on the resolution and the amendment. Let’s go.

Female speaker:

This is a very important initiative for NCSS. It’s very fragile. It’s very contentious. We have to get the language right. We have to get the message right. We all know what we want. So we have to eliminate the word “core” so that it doesn’t diminish or upset our effort to really move this forward. So it’s important that the work move forward with the correct terminology.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Go ahead.

Greg Spielman, CA:

Greg Spielman, California. I move to extend the time for discussion.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

How much?

Greg Spielman, CA:

Five minutes.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We’ll move to extend it for five minutes. Okay we still have one minute left on the old time. Go ahead. No, somebody in the against.

Mounir Farah, International Assembly, AK:

Mounir Farah, I’m University of Arkansas, and representing the International Assembly. I just have a, I mean, are we really asking for standards examinations and testings for social studies if it is to be included in the core? Because, as far as I know, every state requires social studies. Every state has some kind of framework or curricular outlines that requires social studies. Every state requires certain units for graduation from high school to be in social studies. So what are we asking for? Are we asking really so it will be, we will have testing like in math, and science, or reading, or just inclusion of social studies, which is already included?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Time has expired.

Male speaker:

Point of order

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We now have to move to either extend the time or close it.

Kelly Curtright, CS4, OK:

Point of order, Kelly Curtright. I understand we’re talking about the amendment to strike “core” not talking about the resolution itself. Is that correct?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

The amendment is on the screen. That’s correct.

Kelly Curtright, CS4, OK:

Okay.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We need an extension of time. Could somebody put a motion in if they want an extension of time? Then we call for the vote if there is no motion. There was no motion. Somebody had mentioned let’s put it in. Please.

Female speaker:

I make a motion that we have an extension, a five minute extension of time on this resolution.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you. There’s a motion to extend time for five minutes. We need to vote on it. Is there a second?

Male speakers:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Well let’s do a voice vote. Those in favor of extending it five minutes, please raise your. Please stand up. Let’s do it that way. Stand up. Thank you. Those who are opposed. Okay, I think we’re going to have to. We’re extending the time five minutes. My colleague said [inaudible]. Let’s go.

Jeff Passe, CUFA:

Jeff Pass, Past President. I’d like to remind the House that the purpose of the resolutions is to advise the Board of Directors. I know people love debating the technical wording and so forth. But the Board of Directors gets the message. And basically what we’re trying to do is come up with a resolution that says we want more social studies. I think we can all agree on that. And I, I advise that, recommend to the House that we not get so caught up in the picayune issues and let’s move this thing along because the Board will get the message if we pass this resolution.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Go ahead.

Beth Ratway, WI:

I’m closer now so I look like a lady, lovely. I just want you to know that we also had this.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

I apologize again.

Beth Ratway, WI:

We also had the same discussion. It was really difficult for us to get to this point ‘cause we thought common core, it needs to be part of it. And it doesn’t. If we want to be part of the national movement.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Please speak to us up here. Thank you.

Beth Ratway, WI:

If we need. I’m actually talking. Well anyway. If we needed and we wanted to be part of the national movement, it has to not say “core.” And that’s the only way the Board can support it.

Female speaker:

I’d like to move to call the question on the amendment.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Question has been called. Is there a second?

Speakers:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

All in. Okay. We need a two thirds vote to stop the time. Let’s do it by voice. All in favor of calling the question now, say aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

All opposed say nay. Great the ayes have it. So the question has been called on the amendment to strike the word “core” for the resolution. We’re going to do a voice vote on that. All in favor of striking the word “core” from the resolution, please say aye. All opposed, please say nay. Great. So now let’s go back to the resolution. The ayes. Excuse me, the ayes have it. “Core” is now struck from the resolution.

All right we still have two minutes for discussion on the amended resolution. There is a motion to call the question. Is there a second?

Speakers:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Great. All in favor, please say aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Opposed, please say nay.

Speakers:

Nay.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

I think the ayes have it. Now we are voting on Resolution 10-2-1 that has been revised with the word “core” out. It’s not going to show up on the screen, but the word “core” will be out. We’re using the clickers for this resolution. Those in favor of the resolution, it’s one. Two is Against. Three is Abstain. You can vote now. Thirty seconds. The resolution has passed. Total votes. I can’t read that. One nineteen For and twenty three Against.

Moving on. 10-2-2. Resolution 10-2-2: Development and Dissemination of Implementation Examples to the Newly Published National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies, A Framework for Teaching, Learning, and Assessment. This is sponsored by the Canada Community.

BE IT RESOLVED that NCSS communities, associated and affiliated groups and councils be afforded the opportunity to submit examples to this volume and that these submissions be available to NCSS members via a specific location on the NCSS website related to this volume;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that NCSS communities, associated and affiliated groups and councils submit the examples as early as a web page location can be practicably developed and that the submissions be accepted on an ongoing basis.

Discussion is now open. Those who are for it, the front microphone. Against it, the back microphone.

Ruth Writer, Canada Community, MI:

Good morning. I’m Rudy Writer, representing the Canada Community. I am not Canadian. I am from Michigan. And our organization, our community felt that there may be wonderful examples that the various organizations have that may not have been included and we can have this ongoing. Teachers always love ways to implement the standards. So we felt that this would be a way that we could do economically and on an ongoing basis. Thank you.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you.

Hillary Rosenthal, IL:

Hillary Rosenthal, Illinois. I’m in favor of this but I do have a question. This, we’re using this model for the new version of psychology standards through APA. But my question is: Who is going to vet the submissions because you can’t just have people posting to this website. There needs to be some consideration of who’s going to have the approval before they’re posted. So I’d like to see that question addressed before we vote.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

In the, in the rear.

Walt Herscher, WI:

Walt Herscher, Wisconsin. I’ve got a similar concern on the last Resolved where it says submissions will be accepted on an ongoing basis. Would the NCSS be able to put like a disclaimer at the beginning essentially saying we don’t consider these responsible for all of our things that we’re doing?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Any other for or against? We still have time left.

Male speaker:

Call the question.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

The question has been called. Okay. Go ahead.

Ruth Luevanos [inaudible]:

Ruth Luevanos [inaudible] Southern California Social Science Council would like to co-sponsor this resolution. I don’t know if I need to make a motion.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We got it.

Female speaker:

Okay.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We got it. Any other comments? Is there a second to stop debate and vote? We need. Hearing no seconds, we go on with debate. Oh, thank you, all right. Those in favor of calling the question, please say aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Those opposed, please say nay. The ayes have it. The question has been called. Please take your clickers out. You vote now. For is one. Against is two. Three is Abstain. Please re-do your vote because some of you may have voted before we started this. So, we’re just going to ask you, everyone to re-do their vote. Thank you. Apologize for that. Please re-do it. Okay the, the resolution has passed. One eleven to thirty two. Thank you.

Moving on. Resolution 10-3-1: Development of Inquiry Based Pedagogy in Common State Standards. Sponsored, Connecticut Council for the Social Studies. Co-sponsors: ATSS/UFT, New York City, New York State Council for the Social Studies, Tennessee Council for the Social Studies.

I’m going to read the BE IT RESOLVED now.

BE IT RESOLVED as it develops Common State Standards for social studies, NCSS should seek to develop and support social studies standards that challenge students to explore a range of points of view when considering historical interpretations and contemporary issues;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED NCSS should seek to develop and support social studies standards that encourage students to research and evaluate evidence, analyze and debate alternative viewpoints and reach defensible conclusions;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED NCSS should collaborate with its partners in developing Common State Standards for social studies, to make every effort to encourage diverse perspectives, alternate viewpoints and inquiry;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED NCSS should provide regular reports to its membership on the adoption and implementation of Common State Standards that support and promote inquiry for both teachers and students.

Those who are for it, front. Rear, for those against it.

Stephen Armstrong, CT:

Steve Armstrong, Connecticut Council for the Social Studies. This motion actually came out of an extensive discussion among a group of teachers, high school and college teachers, who are engaged in the review of the Connecticut state standards. And that, that discussion led to this motion. The motion simply asks that, as we consider the development of, not core, but Common State Standards, that in the context of these standards, that students be continually and constantly asked to be considering different points of view, alternative viewpoints, and diverse perspectives. That the group felt strongly that, that these should be fundamental aspects of any development of any standards and all units in those state standards. So that’s. In essence, what the motion asks is that diversity and diverse viewpoints, and alternative viewpoints be constantly considered in the development of these standards. Thank you very much.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you.

Peggy Altoff, CO:

Really a point of information, in the first BE IT RESOLVED it says, “as it develops Common State Standards, NCSS should seek to develop.” NCSS is not developing the Common State Standards.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

You can’t speak unless some. Well you’ve got to make sure somebody else is not speaking first. For. Steven.

Stephen Armstrong, CT:

Sure, I think the makers of the motion would, would not be opposed to any alternative wording. That is a little awkward there. So Peggy if you have an alternative wording of that it would be appreciated, or if someone does.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

It’s going to have to be in the form of an amendment, and that’s fine, but we need alternative wording. Let’s move it along.

Jeff Passe, CUFA:

Jeff Passe, College and University Faculty. I move that we amend the statement, the first BE IT RESOLVED to say, As Common State Standards for social studies are developed” rather than “as it develops.”

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Wait a second. Don’t. Let’s, let’s.

Jeff Passe, CUFA:

Would you like for me to repeat that?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Is that the motion?

Jeff Passe, CUFA:

That is the motion to amend.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Let’s repeat that.

Jeff Passe, CUFA:

And remove the words, remove the words “it develops.” And therefore it would read “BE IT RESOLVED as Common State Standards for social studies are developed.” So I’m adding the words “are developed” and removing the words “it develops.”

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

So we have an amendment on the floor. We need to have discussion on the amendment. This gentleman was in the back, had something he wanted to say. Go ahead. I’m sorry.

Lewis Huffman, SC, CS4:

Lewis Huffman, South Carolina, representing CS4. I would concur with Peggy Altoff that this, that NCSS is not the group that is doing this. This is a state-led initiative. And therefore, by representing a state, I would say that this is, this is not in the purview of NCSS to do this because NCSS is a facilitator of this movement, if you will. So I don’t even know if you can encourage NCSS to support this. But I don’t think they are the decision makers in this process.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We need to speak to the amendment first and then we can speak to that. So let’s go back to the amendment and that’s what we need to deal with. Go ahead.

Male speaker:

Speaking for the original, where that amendment came from.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

The amendment only at this point.

Male speaker:

Correct. The original makers of the amendment, of the original motion would support the amendment.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. So let’s, let’s do a voice vote on the amendment. We need to have the question called because we still have time. I’m sorry.

Female speaker:

Call the question.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Question has been called. Second?

Speakers:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Fine. All in favor of the amendment, please signify by. I’m sorry. Sorry. All in favor of stopping debate, please signify by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Opposed? The, the ayes have it.

Move on to the amendment. Those in favor of the amendment, signify by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Those opposed, say no. The ayes have it.

So we are now back to 10-3-1 as amended. Discussion.

Kelly Curtright, CS4, OK:

Kelly Curtright, Oklahoma Council for the Social Studies. In the one section that we were dealing with, we’d like to offer an amendment to clarify and back up what both Peggy and Lewis Huffman said about, this is a state-led initiative. Would like to after what we have just amended, where if I understand right, it says it’s now: “BE IT RESOLVED as Common State Standards for the social studies are developed, NCSS.” And this is where I would like to change the language: “would continue to support social studies standards that challenge students,” etc. So simply strike the words “seek to develop and” and replace it with “continue to.”

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We need a second for that.

Speaker:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Discussion on the amendment only. Peggy.

Peggy:

All I want to say is, for those of us who are visual learners, and it has been the practice of HOD in the past, could we have the changes put on the screen please in the script so that we can see?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Working on it.

Peggy:

Have we, have we done it?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We’re working on it.

Peggy:

Oh. We’re work, it’s a work in progress. Thank you sir.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

You’re welcome. Steven.

Stephen Armstrong, CT:

The original makers of that, of the original motion would not oppose the amendment.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you.

Male speaker:

Call for the question.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

The question has been called. Do we have a second?

Speakers:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay, we’ve moved and seconded to stop debate. So those in favor of stopping debate, please say aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Opposed, nay. Ayes have it. So the amendment is now going to be voted on. Those in favor of the amendment, please signify by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Those opposed, by saying nay. The amendment has been passed. We’re back to the original resolution as amended twice.

Male speaker:

Call the question.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Question has been called. Do we have a second?

Speaker:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Do we have any discussion? Go ahead. No discussion on calling the question.

Male speaker:

Point of order.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Point of order is fine.

Male speaker:

Can we have the wording before people vote?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

You’re going to get it.

Male speaker:

No, you’re rushing this along. We didn’t have [inaudible] before we voted.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

That’s okay. Give us about thirty seconds. So we’ll just sit here and wait because I don’t want any. One second. You should have it in your screen in a second.

We need a clarification. The person who made the second amendment. Is this? Which paragraph were you dealing with? We. The first or the second? Top one. Okay.

I think it’s up there now.

Male speaker:

Point of order Mr. Chair. The, the move to close debate has been moved and seconded and that shouldn’t be delayed. We should be. We should be voting on that regardless of the wording.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

The move to close debate has been voted and seconded. It has to be voted on now. That is correct.

Male speaker:

Right [inaudible].

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Those in favor of closing debate, signify by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Those opposed, by saying nay. The ayes have it. Debate has been closed. Debate has been closed. It better be a point of information.

Female speaker:

It is a point of information.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you.

Female speaker:

And it is a, a point of order question Mr. Chairman. The point of order question is, you are not calling for abstentions when you are calling for the vote.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

I, you are correct. What, you don’t have to call for abstentions on a closing debate according to the parliamentarian.

Female speaker:

I understand that sir. But you have not been calling for abstentions all day.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Will do. Thank you. I have been told it’s not required to call for abstentions.

Okay the motion is on the floor. Is this a point of order?

Male speaker:

Just to check. Is the wording of the. Is the wording of the first sentence what was voted on?

Speakers:

No.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Yes.

Speakers:

No.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

One second. Is this correct now?

Male speaker:

Okay.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. I’ll read. I’m going to read the whole thing now so we all know what it is. This is the amended and amended resolution.

BE IT RESOLVED as it develops as Common State Standards (don’t do that to me) are developed for social studies NCSS should seek to develop and to, (I’m sorry) NCSS should continue to support social studies standards that challenge students to explore a range of points of view when considering historical interpretations and contemporary issues.

I’m going to read this second one because that has been changed too. Third and forth have not.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED NCSS should seek to develop, okay. So the other one? The only one that has been changed is the first BE IT RESOLVED. So we can vote on it. The whole thing now. Both amendments have been approved. We are now voting on the resolution as it has been amended. And the question has been called. Those in favor of the resolution. No, we’re not going to do this by clicker. Okay. It’s for, against and abstain on one for For. Two is Against. Three is Abstain. On the clicker. On the resolution as amended. Okay. We’re finished. One zero two For. Thirty two Against. No Abstentions. The resolution has passed.

Moving on to Resolution 10-3-2: Honoring Our Veterans, Understanding, Conflicts Through Multiple Perspectives. Sponsored by the Middle States Council for the Social Studies. Co-sponsored by Arkansas Council for the Social Studies, Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies.

BE IT RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies, (in) is in support of our veterans and advocates curriculum and materials addressing multiple perspectives related to American conflicts.

Discussion for and against the amendment. Front microphone for the amendments. Rear microphone against the amendment. Go ahead.

Ruth Stas, Middle States:

I’m Ruth Stas with the Middle States Council for the Social Studies. And just, the sponsor is not the mid states. It’s the Middle States. Okay.

And the other thing is, I have a problem with the use “American” throughout the resolution. Which American?

Ruth Luevanos, CA:

Ruth Luevanos, Southern California Social Sciences Association. I’m asking for a point of clarification to the sponsors of this resolution as to what the definition of American conflicts is.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay. Is there somebody who would like to speak to that who wrote the resolution? Anybody else? Go ahead. You can go Ruth since there’s no. Go ahead. Nobody else is there.

Ruth Stas, Middle States:

I’m back again with the American issue. And I don’t have. I guess they all got. You can’t say American. It makes us seem ethnocentric. And I would like to substitute the word “United States” for the word “American.”

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

You want a substitute amendment?

Ruth Stas, Middle States:

Yes.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Could you just speak.

Ruth Stas, Middle States:

Yes, as an amendment to replace the “American” with “United States.”

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

To strike the word “American” and replace it with “United States.” That is your amendment? So is there a second on the amendment?

Speaker:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Yes, we have a second. Let’s get. Discussion on the amendment only. Okay. The question, question is called. So. Okay, we’re going to vote on the amendment. Those in favor of the amendment, signify by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Those opposed, say nay. The ayes have it. The amendment is now reads “United States” and not “American.”

Back to the original motion, the original resolution which now says, “United States” and not “American” in all the places where it was. Discussion on the resolution as it has been amended now. For. In the back, I’m sorry. In the back first.

Avi Black, CA:

Oh, that’s okay. Thank you. My name is Avi Black from California Council. I’m just asking for some clarification on the last WHEREAS statement. Excuse me. It says that there is coverage from one perspective. I’m just not clear on what the, what that one perspective is that’s being written into this.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Does somebody want to? Okay. You’re correct. Go ahead. We’re only discussing. We discuss the resolution. Not the WHEREAS, so.

Mounir Farah, International Assembly, AR:

Yeah. Mounir Farah representing the International Assembly. I’m also from Arkansas. The, you know that brings to my mind before the days of many people here when we were involved in the war in Viet Nam. Many people were taking it on the Veterans who were coming back from the war, associating the war, their attitudes towards the war with the Veterans who fought there. And so this, this is basically, no matter how we view the, the conflict. And we should be encouraged to see multiple perspectives of the conflict. Whatever, we, we feel about the conflict the Veterans should be honored because they were not the ones who made, the ones who made the decision. Thank you.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Is there any further discussion? Yes sir.

Greg Spielman, CA:

Craig Steelman from California. I’m torn like crazy. I’m from San Diego, a military town. And I’m a family of Veterans, I. But I won’t be able to support this amendment when it says one perspective. I’m not sure what that one perspective is. It’s kind of a, a loaded question. And so I’m going to have to urge people, on that, it’s very difficult to do, but on that one point, that we not vote for this resolution.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Anyone want to speak on the for issue? Go ahead.

Caroline Sheffield, CUFA:

My name is Caroline Sheffield. I’m with College and University Faculty Assembly. We’re not debating the WHEREAS. What we should be debating is the BE IT RESOLVED.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

That is correct. We said that about three minutes ago. Yes sir.

Lewis Huffman, CS4, SC:

Again, Lewis Huffman, South Carolina and CS4. I’m having difficulty seeing the connection between supporting the Veterans and advocating curriculum materials addressing multiple perspectives. I don’t see the connection between those two things. I’m, I’m kind of in favor of both of them. But there’s no connection.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We’ve got less than, we’ve got about three and a half minutes left for discussion. Go ahead.

Jim Lane, OH:

Jim Lane from the International Assembly and from Ohio. I also agree with the last statement. And this is not just an issue if you’re talking about multiple perspectives in, in the United States conflicts. It’s in World History as well. So when it says something about American History, you can be talking about World History. It seems like there’s a dual purpose in this resolution. To support or Veterans is one point and another point to have multiple perspectives. And it should be on all conflicts. Not just American History concerns with United States conflicts.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you.

Scott Wiley, Issue Centered Community:

Hi, I’m Scott Wiley from the Issue Centered Community. And I would just like to strongly encourage us to think if you’re considering voting against this bill, to maybe make a motion to table it. I’m not making this motion, but consider making a motion to table it for rewrite. And here’s why.

When things like this get reported in the media if we were to vote against, this is dangerous language that we’re using. When we vote against, if we were to vote against this, the National Council for the Social Studies House of Delegates voted against a bill supporting the Veterans. All right? So think about that. And I’m not saying, you know, this bill. Basically my point is, if you’re considering voting against it, consider making a motion to table it for rewrite instead. Thank you.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Go ahead.

Female speaker:

In lieu of that commentary, I move to table the motion for a rewrite.

Speakers:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Could you explain what, what that means? Please tell us what you mean by tabling it.

Female speaker:

Tabling the motion to edit and, and reword the resolution. And send it back to Resolutions Committee to be reworded. [inaudible]

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Do you want to postpone it to a specific time and have these people rewrite it for next year?

Female speaker:

Yes.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Can’t be done now. So you’re voting. Could we. We could. Point of clarification on this from the parliamentarian. We can have the motion withdrawn. We can’t have it tabled. We can’t have it postponed. We can have it withdrawn and if they would like to rewrite it next year, they can rewrite it next year. That they can do. But that. Okay. We can’t, we can have the motion postponed, postponed indefinitely or we can have the motion withdrawn. So which one do you want to put on the table?

Female speaker:

Move to withdraw the motion.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Move to withdraw the motion. Is there a second for that?

Speakers:

Second.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

It’s been moved and seconded to withdraw Resolution 10-3-2. Do we have some discussion on this? Okay. We need to call the question on this. Those in favor on having the motion withdrawn, please signify by voting, by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Those opposed, say nay. The motion has been voted to be withdrawn.

Okay. We’re moving on to 10-4-1. I’m sorry. 10-4-1: Teaching About Anti-Semitism Today. Sponsors are ATSS/UFT. Co-sponsor New York State Council for the Social Studies.

I’m only reading the BE IT RESOLVED. The WHEREAS do not get read. We don’t discuss the WHEREAS.

BE IT RESOLVED THAT NCSS include in its conference program a workshop or speaker on teaching about current anti-Semitism;

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that NCSS include in its publications material on teaching about current anti-Semitism.

Discussion on the motion for and against. The for in the front. Carolyn.

Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT, New York City:

Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT, New York City. This is a rewrite from last year, something that was tabled which seemed to generate a great deal of confusion. And this is to clarify it. First of all, it is not about the Holocaust. It is about anti-Semitism today. And there really is anti-Semitism today in this country and other parts of the world. And people brought to my attention that they really didn’t know that.

I’m going to give you two examples. On the day that ATSS/UFT this year approved this resolution I came home, turned on the radio and there is a report of desecration of a synagogue in Teaneck, NJ.

You might have heard about the group that was picketing the military funerals and it’s a Supreme Court case now. Well that very same group on October 12th came to Brooklyn, NY and with signs in the most, the largest Hasidic Orthodox community in the world, came there with picket signs that said Christ killed Jews.

This is something that is current but you may not be aware of it. And the purpose of this motion is that NCSS make materials available to teachers so that they can teach about anti-Semitism whenever they choose, in any way that it fits the curriculum, the way they want to do it. It’s not a manifesto and it’s not something where they’re required to do it. But it provides material for them to be able to do it because they don’t get it in other ways. Thank you. I, I urge that you vote to support this here.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

In the back. In the rear.

Mounir Farah, International Assembly, AR:

Yes. Mounir Farah, International Assembly. I am, I’m supporting the resolution, however I would like to propose a, a friendly amendment.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

No such thing as a friendly amendment. It’s an amendment.

Mounir Farah, International Assembly, AR:

Well, amendment, amendment, amendment. Okay. In an amicable way, but an amendment. Okay. The, the, at the, what I would say is BE IT RESOLVED, at the end [inaudible] “teaching about current anti-Semitism” and then comma “violation of a human right and respect and understanding of all religions.” This will be in line with the first and second WHEREAS. The WHEREAS, the first WHEREAS was, was “genocide and violation of human rights in the world today.” The second WHEREAS “NCSS encourages the teaching of [inaudible] all religions and respect for it” and, and so, and then anti-Semitism. So in line with that, I would say the, would like to have the amendment to add violation of the, after anti-Semitism, “violation of the human rights and respect and understanding of all religions.”

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We have an amendment on the floor. Do we have a second to the amendment? Just, bring up the wording here please. The gentleman who came up with the amendment. Please bring up the wording. We have. This way we can get it up there. We have an amendment on the floor. Those in favor of the. We need to repeat. Okay. If I have this correct, we’re adding after the first BE IT RESOLVED “violation of human rights and respect and understanding of all religions.” Is that correct? That is correct. It was seconded. There’s discussion on it now. We’re discussing the amendment to the Resolution 10-4-1. Steve.

Stephen Armstrong, CT:

Yes. Steve Armstrong, Connecticut Council for the Social Studies. I’m not standing to disagree with the word of the original motion. Supporting the original motion one hundred percent. But I think adding where we are right now in America that the part about respecting and, and validating all religions is a crucial part to put into this motion.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you. Any further discussion on this? Carolyn.

Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT, New York City:

The maker of the motion agrees with it.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Thank you. Any further discussion on the motion? Call the question. We do a voice vote on the amendment. Those in favor of the amendment as. It’s not up there. If you like, I will read it once more. So it’s. Oh, it’s up there now. Okay. There it is. Immediate gratification guys. So it’s up there. So we are voting on the amendment only. Those in favor of the amendment, please signify by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Those opposed, please signify by saying nay. The amendment passes. Are there any abstentions? Okay. We can go back to the original, the original motion as amended. We have five minutes time left for discussion on the original motion as amended. Original resolution as amended.

Speaker:

Call for question.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Okay the question has been called. Do I have a second? Those in favor of calling the question, please signify by saying aye.

Speakers:

Aye.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Opposed by saying nay. The, the ayes have it. So now we’re going to go to the clickers and vote on Resolution 10-4-1 as amended. Thank you. The ayes have it. A hundred and twenty ayes, twelve nays.

Stephen Armstrong, CT:

Point of information.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

The resolution has been passed. You have a point of information?

Stephen Armstrong, CT:

Steve Armstrong. I suspect not, but would it be possible to change the title of a resolution that we just passed?

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Nope. No.

Stephen Armstrong, CT:

The title may seem slightly inappropriate, but. Okay.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

We are going to Resolution 10-5-1. These are courtesy resolutions, so we don’t vote on them. Recognition of NCSS President Steven Goldberg, sitting [inaudible]. Let’s give him a round of applause before I even read it.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you.

Robert Dytell, NY, Chair, Resolutions Committee:

Steve. BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the National Council for the Social Studies fully recognizes and thanks Steve Goldberg for his dedication, diligence, and commitment to the advancement of social studies and the NCSS.

It’s passed. We don’t vote on these.

Second resolution. Resolution 10-5-2: Recognition of NCSS Past President, Peggy Altoff as Conference Co-Chair.

And I keep seeing Peggy running around here. So, it’s, we all know it.

BE IT RESOLVED THAT the National Council for the Social Studies staff and membership thank Peggy for hard work and dedication in making "Vistas, Visions & Voices" a successful conference.

And Resolution 10-5-3: Recognition of NCSS Local Arrangements Committee Co-Chairs, Dorsee Johnson-Tucker and Chris Elnicki.

BE IT RESOLVED THAT the National Council for the Social Studies staff and membership honor and thank these members for their exemplary work, commitment and service to our national and international colleagues. Thank you very much.

Anton Schulzki, Canada and CO, Chair, Steering Committee:

Thank you once again for your patience as we worked through some of the discussions and the voting. We have one last thing that we’re going to actually use the clickers for and that is the evaluations. And it’s actually very important that you take the time to vote using the clickers for each of the questions. It is also really important that you also take the time to also make comments on the sheets. They will be collected. The Steering Committee will go through those and make adjustments for the 55th House of Delegates.

So at this point in time please hang on for just a second please. For question one, please make your vote. That’s question one. Ten seconds to vote please. Would you please now vote on question two. If you would please re-vote on question two. A couple of people may have jumped the gun a little early before we were able to start collecting it. So question two, would you please re-vote. Thank you. Question three, it’s just a reminder that it’s only for first year delegates, are answering question three. That’s just for first year delegates. Thank you. Question four. One moment please. Question four, go ahead and vote. Ten seconds. Would you now vote on question five? Ten seconds. Go ahead and vote on question six please. Wait a moment. Hang on. Hang on just a second. Hang on just a second please. Now please vote on question six. Thank you. Ten seconds on question six. Thank you. Now would you please vote on question number seven? Ten seconds. Thank you. Please vote on question number eight. Ten seconds. Question nine is open. Ten seconds. Question ten, please vote. Ten seconds. Question eleven. And ten seconds on that. Question twelve. Ten seconds. Just a few more. Question thirteen. Ten seconds. Question fourteen please. Ten seconds. Question fifteen please. Ten seconds. Question sixteen. Ten seconds. Question seventeen, please vote. Could we, we’re going to ask people to just hang on for one minute please. We do need to do one re-vote. We have one re-vote and then Steve has a few quick announcements and recognitions. Would you please, we need to re-vote on question number fourteen, on question number fourteen. And so if you get an opportunity, would you please re-vote on question fourteen starting now. Thank you. Ten seconds. Thank you.

Just a couple of quick announcements before we get, before everyone starts moving around. Steve has some important recognitions as well as the meeting has to be closed. Two things, two quick announcements before I give it to Steve. Please be sure that when you leave the House of Delegates you turn in both the yellow evaluation form as well as your clicker. And you can turn those in to the back table. I’m sorry, and the green questionnaire. Steve.

Steven Goldberg, NY, NCSS President:

Thank you. Thank you much Anton. And thank you all for your indulgence this morning. Before we adjourn, a couple of things. I would like to take this time to recognize the students who many of you had the opportunity to greet when you came to get, pick up your materials. These are students from one of our student NCSS chapters. And this is particular is from the Students Point Chapter in Wisconsin. So I want to thank you very much for your involvement. And I really. Would you guys stand up please? We really appreciate that. And I think this is a good indication of, of the future. And what we’re trying to do is encourage the establishment of student chapters on many of the universities across the country. And this is one of the groups that’s serving as a good model for that. And also John Moore is coordinating a lot of effort in that direction. So if you’re working at a university and you want to get involved in establishing student chapters, you might want to see John.

In addition, those people who are Council Presidents are reminded that this afternoon at 3:15 we have the Council Presidents Meeting in the Convention Center in room 608.

Please make sure that if you are elected to any of our committees, new members, please just come forward to meet and get your marching orders.

And I would like to hereby adjourn this meeting. We will reconvene in Washington, DC on December 2nd. You’ll be able to register starting on December 1st. Meeting is adjourned.
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