National Council for the Social Studies

Fifty-Sixth Annual House of Delegates

Seattle, Washington

First Session

3:45 through 5:45 p.m.

Friday, November 16, 2012

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: We would like to start at this time. But it's come to my attention that not everyone has turned in their credentials. Gloria, what do we need?

GLORIA MCELROY, TENNESSEE, STEERING COMMITTEE: [Speaking off mic.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: If you have a green card and you still have it in your possession, would you please hold it up.

GLORIA MCELROY, TENNESSEE, STEERING COMMITTEE: Thank you.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: We need these in order to count how many delegates are actually here so that we can take votes that count. Important!

[Simultaneous speaking.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Jordan? Jordan, at this time can you close the doors in the back, please.

GLORIA MCELROY, TENNESSEE, STEERING COMMITTEE: Anybody else?

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Good afternoon.

ATTENDEES: Good afternoon.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: My name is John Moore. I am president of the National Council for the Social Studies. And I am from the Kentucky Council for the Social Studies. At this time I would like for each of us to stand for the pledge of allegiance to the flag.

ATTENDEES: I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you. You may be seated.

I would like to welcome each of you to the 56th Annual House of Delegates Meeting here in Seattle, Washington. And first I would like to introduce you to the members of the platform.

To my immediate right is Maria Sanelli from Middle States, and she serves as our steering committee chair.

Rick Daniel from Kentucky, to my immediate left, serves as our vice chair.

Ron Adams is sitting next to Rick, and he derives from New Hampshire, a member of the steering committee.

Next to Ron is Susan Griffin, the National Council for the Social Studies executive director.

Next to Susan is Sue Blanchette, immediate past president of the National Council for the Social Studies. And Sue is from the Texas council.

To the left \x97 I mean, I'm sorry; to the right of Maria is Paula Mentari [ph] and Paul McClintock. And we thank Paul for joining us today to keep us in order.

All right, good afternoon. Today, prior to beginning our business meeting, we have a very special guest, a treat actually, a resident of Seattle who served as NCSS president in 1964, Dr. Isidore Starr. Dr. Starr is also a past president of the New York City NCSS Local Affiliate Council, the Association of Teachers of Social Studies, United Federation of Teachers.

And at this time, with the representatives from this delegation, please stand. Okay, thank you. You may be seated.

[Applause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Dr. Starr is professor emeritus at Queens College, City University of New York, and is regarded as the father of law-related education for his long-time work in that field.

Without further ado, please join me in welcoming, with a big round of applause, our oldest living NCSS president, Dr. Isidore Starr.

[Applause, cheers.]

ISIDORE STARR, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT (1964): Can you all hear me?

ATTENDEES: Yes.

ISIDORE STARR, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT (1964): Is it okay?

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Yes.

ISIDORE STARR, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT (1964): It has been said that a teacher can lose his eyesight and remain a teacher. A teacher can lose his hearing and remain a teacher. A teacher can even lose his or her mind and be a teacher.

[Laughter.]

ISIDORE STARR, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT (1964): But you cannot lose your voice. That's necessary for a teacher.

My big talk is divided into five quotes, with a brief commentary for each quote.

Quote number one: When President Truman was about to retire from the presidency, he was asked by a newspaper reporter, "Mr. President, now that you are retiring from the highest office in the land, what do you plan to do?" Truman's reply was, "Young man, when I retire from the presidency, I am not retiring from the highest office in the land. I\x92m assuming the highest office in the land, the office of citizen.'" We've just gone through that process of the office of citizen electing a president.

We social studies teachers spend our lives preparing our young people for the office of citizen. We try to convey to them the knowledge and understanding, the analytical skills, the attitudes, the appreciation that\x92s necessary for that office. And we use the social studies hour as our means and we use the extracurricular activities as our aid in preparing our young people for that office.

Quote 2: Professor Hawking of Harvard is reported to have said, "To teach the social studies without the law is like teaching vertebrate anatomy without the backbone.'" He did not mean law school law; he meant law as a humanity.

For our students who understand what John Adams meant when he said, "Ours is a government of laws and not of men," that we live under the rule of law, it is necessary not to ration the teaching of the law. The law is embedded in the social studies and it must be brought to life.

One example. The law illuminates the meaning of liberty, justice, equality, property and power. It illuminates the relationship between those five ideas, the love-hate relationship between power and these other four ideas, and the emphasis is on understanding the nature of law as it affects human life.

Quote three. This is a brief excerpt from Stephen Ben\xE9t's poem, "Nightmare at Noon," just a brief quote: There are certain words, our own and others\x85words we've used, heard, had to recite, forgotten, rubbed shiny in the pocket, left home for keepsakes\x85locked away in the back drawer\x85in the back of the quiet mind. Liberty, equality, fraternity. To none will we sell, refuse or deny, right or justice, we hold these truths to be self-evident. I am merely saying, why do these words pass and are gone\x85and are no more? It took\x85long\x85to buy these words. It took a long time\x85and much pain.

This great poem, written at the start of World War II, conveys the essence of one aspect of social studies, and that is the great historic documents, the voices of the past, the footprints and the march on democracy. These great documents have to be brought to life, and we have to do it with all our imagination and creativity.

For example, imagine the students walking into the first day of your lesson on the Declaration of Independence. They hear music. It's Aaron's Copeland's "Fanfare for the Common Man." This was announced as the appearance of the common man on the stage of history.

You ask, well, what is the relationship between the poem and the declaration? When they leave after the discussion is over, maybe two or three days later you play a selection by the 5th Dimension, a musical group of the '50s and '60s entitled, "We Hold These Truths to Be Self-Evident," sung as a war song. It's such a stimulating thing. It even reverberates in my own mind at this time.

You can also turn to the grievances very briefly, and asking those students whether Jefferson simply listed the grievances as a laundry list or whether the grievances are arranged in some order. Divide the class into committees and ask them to consider that. You'll be surprised at what they come up with.

The fourth quote: "Teaching the social studies is only part of our job. Acting on the basis of our principles is the other half of the job." And this quote I quoted in my presidential speech in '64. We must follow the model of the turtle: To move forward you must stick your neck out.

We've just gone through one of the worst presidential elections in my memory. It was characterized by money madness and political pollution of the worst order. The only real beneficiaries, it seems to me, are the pundits who get paid for their bad advice and the newspapers and preferably the media. It is so important for us to do something about what happened in this past election.

And I would urge the National Council \x97 you, House of Delegates, and the National Council in general, to assume a leadership role in transforming our presidency into a rational system. We can't go through anything like this again. We used to say we have the best Congress money can buy. Now we have the best president money can buy, and this can't go on.

I would urge you to look at the Canadian system of election, the British system, or create your own, but I'd like you to take a leading role in transforming our system so that by \x97 well, by 2016 the election will take place over a period of at most two months.

And I'd like to include a fifth quote, the first 15 words of the preamble to the Constitution: "We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union." I would ask the teachers I taught and the students I taught whether there's anything strange about the wording of those 15 words, and eventually someone would come up and say, yes, the words "more perfect" are not natural. But isn't perfection good enough? Do things have to be more perfect?

And so I would ask them what the framers meant. And of course a classic explanation which I have never forgotten was this: The student stood up, and my recollection is maybe with pomposity, I'm not sure, and he announced: The framers of the Constitution meant by "a more perfect union" a more better union.

[Laughter.]

ISIDORE STARR, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT (1964): And of course it's a laughing matter, but out of the mouths of babes.

Morris Raphael Cohen, one of the great philosophers of the 20th century, once remarked that we are \x97 at least 15 words, by the way \x97 "We are all destined to be born into an imperfect world, but not one of us can abdicate his or her responsibility to try to make it better." This is what we do every day of our lives as teachers. I'd like to wish all of you a long and happy life, and continue to do more better. Thank you.

[Laughter.]

[Applause.]

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: We are so honored to have you here. And we appreciate very much your thoughtful words. I can't tell you how much it means to us to have you with us. And you are a guiding star, truly.

ISIDORE STARR, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT (1964): Yes.

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: Truly. And I want to commend you and to give a token of our appreciation. It says, "We present this award to Isidore Starr in recognition of outstanding contributions to law-related education, social studies, and NCC leadership. Thank you so much.

ISIDORE STARR, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT (1964): Thank you very much.

[Applause.]

ISIDORE STARR, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT (1964): Thank you.

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: I am so inspired.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: What an inspiration. And thank you, Dr. Starr.

Okay, I want to remind you that the agenda is printed in our House of Delegates manual pages 5 through 6. And if there is no objection, the agenda is distributed, and as it is distributed it will be adopted. Are there any objections? There being no objection, the agenda is adopted.

Now, it is customary that the current president at the National Council for the Social Studies review for the delegates the purpose of the House of Delegates. So I would like to review the ideals and purposes of why we are convening this evening and tomorrow morning.

First, our goal is to provide a means whereby the members of NCSS may participate in the development of policies of the organization. Number two, we are expected to serve as a forum for issues relating to the profession and the organization of the council. Number three, it is our intention to serve as the business meeting of the organization. Fourthly, we are to provide a means whereby the president gives the State of Council address. Number five, I would like to explain the purpose of the resolutions process, where they are developed and why they are important.

It should be reminded that Article IX. Resolutions, in the House of Delegates manual pages 22 through 24 states in Section 1 that, "Resolutions represent the principles, beliefs and actions that the general membership of the NCSS, as represented in the House of Delegates, recommend to the NCSS board of directors. Specifically, characteristics of resolutions guide the current or future business operations of NCSS. Resolutions provide direction on the nature of social studies education.

"The resolution process address issues in the fields of history and social science inquiry. Resolutions acknowledge social and political issues which are of concern to social studies educators but do not have direct impact on the nature of social studies education.

"Resolutions do not change the structure of NCSS or bind NCSS to spend money. Resolutions are the processes by which the membership of the council express ideas, recommendations, issues, and concerns relevant to NCSS and its work to promote quality teaching and learning of social studies.

"And lastly, resolutions provide direction to NCSS board of directors for current and future work of NCSS."

So please keep this discussion and summary of the ideals and purpose of revolution \x97 "revolution" \x97 of resolutions \x97

[Laughter.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: \x97 in mind, particularly tomorrow during our consideration of new resolutions that will be presented to the House of Delegates.

Next I would like to introduce Barbara Hairfield, chair from the South Carolina Council for Social Studies, representing the credentials committee. Barbara, would you please come forward?

BARBARA HAIRFIELD, SOUTH CAROLINA, CHAIR, CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE: Dr. Moore, Madam Chairman, and members of the House of Delegates steering committee, at this time I am pleased to introduce the members that serve on the credentials committee. Ana Post and Jordan Grote, both of NCSS, are in the back of the room. I'd like to acknowledge and thank them for their work this year.

[Applause.]

BARBARA HAIRFIELD, SOUTH CAROLINA, CHAIR, CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE: As chair of the credentials committee, I'm pleased to report that 145 delegates are registered and certified to vote in the House of Delegates as of 3:58 p.m. today, Friday, November 16th, 2012.

On behalf of the credentials committee, I move the adoption of the credentials report.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you.

BARBARA HAIRFIELD, SOUTH CAROLINA, CHAIR, CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE: Okay.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you, Barbara. It is moved to adopt the credentials committee report. Those in favor say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Those opposed say no.

ATTENDEE: No.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: The ayes have it. The credentials committee report is adopted.

At this time I would like to recognize Maria Sanelli, chair of this steering committee.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Hello, everybody. On behalf of the House of Delegates steering committee, welcome to Seattle, Washington and the 56th House of Delegates. We would like to extend greetings to all the delegates from the affiliated state councils, the associated groups, and the NCSS communities.

We welcome the delegates and longtime members of affiliated state, local, and regional councils, as well as our affiliated councils. John did a fantastic introduction to what we do in the House of Delegates.

And I'd just like to add a little bit to that, that although this is a democratic house and we are a house of delegates, I would like to remind everybody that this body is a mean by which members can voice their concerns and issues, and we ask for respect and courtesy towards each other and members of the platform as we move through the agenda today and tomorrow. And I thank you for that ahead of time.

At this time I'd like to introduce the members of the 2012 House of Delegates Steering Committee and extend a special note of gratitude for their time and commitment to making these meetings a smooth, informative, and engaging process.

The members of the committee, if you'd please stand, are Rick Daniel from Kentucky Council \x97 he's our vice chair \x97 Gloria L. McElroy from Tennessee; Charles Vaughn from South Carolina, in the back; Ron Adams from New Hampshire; Kathy Uhlich from Texas Council \x97

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: \x97 and Ana Post, as our ex-officio member, is also in the back. Thank you very much, steering committee, for the work that you've done \x97

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: \x97 and continuing throughout our session tonight and tomorrow of course.

Each year the House of Delegates Steering Committee reviews evaluations, which is the yellow paper in your HOD packet, and adjusts the procedures of the House of Delegates, as evidenced in this year's steering committee report and organization of HOD sessions. We truly read those evaluations and they do impact how we change HOD for the following year.

Your feedback and recommendations are essential in guiding the work of the steering committee and planning the next year's House of Delegates. In your packet you'll find this evaluation sheet. The House of Delegates evaluation form is printed on goldenrod paper. The open-ended comments are essential. We get some of our best feedback from that section of the evaluation form. Please remember to submit those evaluation forms at the conclusion of HOD tomorrow.

At this time I would like to present the feedback from the 55th House of Delegates. The results were analyzed and several recommendations were made based upon the comments that the delegates gave last year. If you were here last year you might still have nightmares \x97 I know I do \x97 of the clicker system.

We researched clicker companies, we researched clicker prices, and in the end, to be financially expedient \x97 which goes to the second recommendation \x97 to be financially responsible as NCSS gets back on its feet and secure financially, we decided to not employ electronic voting methods this year.

And we also \x97 I apologize ahead of time \x97 did not provide, or will not provide a continental breakfast tomorrow. So I wanted to give you a heads on that so that you bring some food with you if you need to snack during our two-and-a-half-hour session.

And those are the comments that were made last year. We took them on board and we made the changes as you suggested. So again, remember to make comments on our evaluation forms and we'll make changes for next year, taking your thoughts into consideration.

Let's take a look at the nomination and election process for HOD committees. During the first session of the House of Delegates nominations, we're going to actually have you submit in writing on blue forms \x97 you should have a blue form in your packet \x97 on blue forms we're going to receive your suggestions, your nominations for the three standing committees of the HOD, which are the steering committee, the assignment committee, and the resolutions committee.

Eligibility information is available in the HOD delegate packet. Seated delegates of affiliated councils, associated groups and communities, are all eligible to be HOD committee members. And if you would, please refer to Article X, Section 4 in your handbook to see if you indeed are eligible, and in that way you can be nominated on those blue forms.

Again, one more reminder. Article X, Section 7 gives the eligibility in the listing in compliance with those rules to be able to be eligible to be on those three committees. Nomination forms, those blue sheets, are due at 5:10 this evening \x97 approximately 5:10.

And they should be submitted to steering committee members in the back of the room. You'll see them circulating. Charles and Gloria and Kathy will be coming around collecting blue forms. If you just hold up your blue form and shake it, I'm sure they will see that. As time approaches, you'll see that we will, multiple times, flash a notice on PowerPoint slide letting you know there's only so much time left before nomination forms are due.

Information from nomination forms will be compiled and organized by the steering committee this evening for distribution tomorrow so that when you come into the second session you will have a list of candidates to select from.

Candidates will introduce themselves with their name and their organization they represent, whether it be affiliate council, associated group or community, at the conclusion of this first session of HOD. Unfortunately, time does not allow for speeches. It\x92s a matter of introducing yourself and your affiliation. The steering and credential committees will verify eligibility of nominees and create a ballot for each committee following this first session of HOD.

The committees will occur at the beginning of the second HOD session. The names of the candidates will be read, and read aloud prior to voting. Candidate information will be available at the beginning of the second session.

To be eligible to vote, please remember that you need to be certified tomorrow as well as today, and certification of delegates is at the beginning of HOD. And HOD starts promptly tomorrow morning \x97 I'm sorry \x97 at 8:00 a.m., so you need to get certified before that time. We're going to start at 8:00.

A closed-door policy exists when we're voting where only certified delegates may vote. And we don't allow anyone in and out of the room during the vote to assure that we have an accurate count.

You can see up on the slide right now that we have already two members from a specific council on these three committees, and these three councils are not eligible to run candidates for the committees. And that's South Carolina, Arkansas, Middle States Council of the Social Studies, and Texas.

At this time I'm going to turn over the podium to John Moore, the president, for his address. Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you, Maria.

This morning during the opening presidential breakfast I presented to you information about my experience as a first-year teacher on Standing Rock Indian Reservation in a very small school system. The school system was so small that there was one teacher per content area.

And that one teacher in the social studies content area in that high school was John Moore, meaning that I was responsible for providing instruction in geography, world history, American history, government, elective courses in psychology, sociology, Native American studies.

I found myself always having to defend the ideals and purpose of social studies education among my colleagues in the areas of science, in mathematics, and in the language arts. As a first-year teacher, I sought an avenue, an assistance that I could grab hold of that could help reinforce in a solid way the ideals and purposes of social studies education, to gain respect among parents, the community in Solen, North Dakota, and my colleagues as it relates to social studies education.

The year was 1980, and I looked to NCSS. And whenever I referred to the National Council for the Social Studies in 1980 for assistance in defending the ideals and purposes of social studies education, people listened. The purpose of NCSS today, 32 years later, is loud and clear.

Thanks to NCSS and affiliated state councils, we are respected in a very strong way among the National Council for Teachers of English, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the American Science Teachers Association, Middle School Association, the American Council of Colleges in Teacher Education.

That being said, NCSS is mindful of a strategic plan to help guide us to maintain our respect and recognition as a core academic area in the field of education in preparing students for college, career, and civic life.

We have identified five major goals in our strategic plan, and these goals, as you see before you, have been in existence in the National Council for the Social Studies for the past five years and remain as a vehicle for new teachers, veteran teachers, pre-service teachers to depend on our organization.

We feel that goal A, education and knowledge, with the objective that NCSS will be the leading resource for professionals who seek social studies knowledge, collegiality, and learning opportunities throughout their careers.

Goal B, advocacy, visibility goal. NCSS, we would like to remain strong and mindful of the fact that educators and public policy makers will regard NCSS and its members as shapers of educational policies impacting social studies.

Goal C, membership goal. NCSS, as any other organization, is mindful of the fact that there is indeed strength in numbers, and so our goal is to maintain and enhance membership. We will embrace and unite professionals representing all grade levels and disciplines of social studies education.

Our goal is also citizenry goal. Social studies knowledge and skills will be central to sound decision making and engagement in civic life. And lastly, to maintain social studies excellent, we would like to base our NCSS policies and standards so that our content area will remain prevalent as a core subject area.

I would like to point out and close by giving you three major initiatives that have been taking place in 2012 that supports those particular goals. If you have read the last issue of the Social Studies Professional, my first article focused on how I have established an ad hoc committee to review the status of the community system. And the community system will enhance participation among our members.

Another TSSP article focuses on the enhancement of pre-service teachers. And if you are mindful of the fact that pre-service teachers are the future of our organization, it is clear that pre-service teachers and their role in NCSS aligns with all five of our goals.

And lastly, Susan Griffin tomorrow will present to us an update on how social studies education has been working with the need to establish a framework of common core standards in our academic area.

So I would like to close by pointing out that NCSS is alive and well, and I look forward to your continued support and participation in the organization now and for its future. Thank you very much.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: At this time are there any questions for John? Hearing no questions, we'll move to the next report. Thank you, John, for your report.

Laura Richards is our chair of our assignment committee. She's from the Arkansas Council of the Social Studies. And if you'd welcome her to the podium please.

[Applause.]

LAURA RICHARDS, ARKANSAS, CHAIR, ASSIGNMENT COMMITTEE: I'm Laura Richards from the Arkansas Council for the Social Studies. I would like to introduce the assignment committee members: Donald Imler of Pennsylvania; Susan Locklear of Texas; Mary Davis of Middle States; Megan Gately of Arizona; myself, chair from Arkansas; and Thomas Riddle from South Carolina.

I would like to read the slate of committee assignments, which should be on the screen.

The awards committee: Marilyn Ward and Molly David.

For archives committee: Tiffany Middleton and Scott Roberts.

For conference committee: Shawn Quinn and Jeremy Eddie.

For government/public relations committee: Michael Collazo and Andrew Potter.

For international visitors committee: Misato Yamagachi and Jeffrey Tsyford.

For membership committee: David Stewart and Melissa Seidelman.

And publications committee: Lesa Martin and Brad Magath.

Mr. President, by direction of the assignment committee, I move adoption of this slate of candidates for election to the NCSS operations committees.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you, Laura. It is moved to adopt the assignment committee\x92s slate of candidates. Are there any objections? Hearing no objection, the slate of candidates is adopted. Thank you.

Maria Sanelli, chair.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Thank you, Laura.

The next committee we'd like to get a report from, standing committee \x97 the last standing committee. We've had the steering committee report, the assignment committee report. We'd like to move on to the resolutions committee report. And I'd like to invite Leigh Sullivan, also from the Arkansas Council of the Social Studies, to come up on the podium and talk about resolutions.

LEIGH SULLIVAN, ARKANSAS, CHAIR, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: Hello, everyone. My name is Leigh Sullivan. I represent the Arkansas Council of the Social Studies. I'm currently serving as the chair this year of the resolution committee.

I'd like to introduce other members of the committee, and I'd like them to stand please and be recognized: Scott Noet from Minnesota, Jennifer Morgan from Wisconsin, Cheryl Rehome Dean from California, Eugene Earsom from Oklahoma, and David Houston from Mississippi.

[Applause.]

LEIGH SULLIVAN, ARKANSAS, CHAIR, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: This year the House of Delegates will be considering seven resolutions. Proposed resolutions were developed after NCSS made a call to affiliated councils, associated groups and communities in the summer of 2012. Two calls for resolutions were made prior to the October 1, 2012 deadline for electronic submission of resolutions

New packets of resolutions were distributed at the opening of today\x92s HOD session. They are printed on white paper. And this packet includes changes to proposed resolutions, resolutions submitted electronically in October and at the open hearing for resolutions. Today\x92s resolutions have been revised, ordered, and edited by the resolutions committee.

For information concerning the resolutions process in the House of Delegates session, please refer to the House of Delegates manual, Article IX. Resolutions, Section 3.

Resolution numbers, titles, and be it resolved \x97 or actions \x97 will be read into record prior to delegate debate and voting during the second HOD session, which is tomorrow, Saturday, November 17th. Please refer to the new resolutions packet for the complete version of all proposed resolutions this year.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Thank you for your report, Leigh.

Resolutions, you know, you could send them in in advance. We had a hearing this morning. You could bring resolutions at that time. It's also part of our bylaws that at this time, if someone has a resolution, they can also be introduced on the floor given the rules and regulations that are outlined in the House of Delegates manual.

Are there any resolutions from the floor today? Not seeing any, let me move on, on the agenda. Let me remind you again nominations on your blue forms for nominees for steering committee, assignment committee, and the resolutions committee are due. Please make sure that you fill those out.

Formal introductions to the candidates for those committees will be done at the very end of this session. We will be collating them and typing the names up on the slides to call up the nominees at the end of this session.

Moving the agenda further, this is the time that we actually introduce to you candidates who are running for NCSS vice president and the board of directors. At this time, if you are running for any of the positions on the board of directors or vice president, would you please line up with Charles on \x97

ATTENDEE: Over here.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Over here. Charles will help you line up. We'll have you line up with the vice presidential candidates first, followed by elementary representatives, sec ed representatives, K-12 teacher at large, and at-large representatives, in that order. And Charles has a note as to that effect.

At this time I'd like to introduce our past president of the National Council for the Social Studies, Sue Blanchette, who is the chair of the nominations and elections committee, who will introduce the candidates.

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: Thank you. I'd like to first give a very big thanks to the nominations committee. This year we had to make some very difficult decisions, and I applaud the nominations committee for their diligence and their work that they put into this.

Barbara Hairfield from South Carolina, Mike Koren from Wisconsin, Eddie Bennett from Georgia, Scott McComb from Maryland, Peggy Altoff from Colorado, and Judy Brodigan from Texas, all were absolutely godsends in helping me get this process done.

For the vice presidential candidates you have five minutes. For the board candidates you have three minutes. And Gloria McElroy will be keeping time. And she will drag you off the stage with a fishhook if you go over time.

[Laughter.]

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: Give them a dirty look? So please tend to that.

As you know, we do not elect president or president-elect at this point. In 2013, Steve Armstrong from Connecticut will serve as president of NCSS.

[Applause.]

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: And Michelle Herczog from California will be the president-elect.

[Applause.]

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: At this point I will start with the vice presidential nominees. Gloria, are you ready to go?

GLORIA MCELROY, TENNESSEE, STEERING COMMITTEE: Oh, sure thing.

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: Okay. And we'll go in alphabetic order, so Michael Boucher from Indiana, please.

MICHAEL BOUCHER, INDIANA, CANDIDATE FOR VICE PRESIDENT: Good evening. Good evening.

ATTENDEES: Good evening.

MICHAEL BOUCHER, INDIANA, CANDIDATE FOR VICE PRESIDENT: All right. There we go.

So in 1988 \x97 sorry, 1998, I received a prize in my school mailbox. I had won a free year of membership to the Minnesota Council for the Social Studies, for one year. I had signed up for a drawing at the Minnesota Education Association Conference in the fall. And I found out later that everyone who signed up also received a free membership.

[Laughter.]

MICHAEL BOUCHER, INDIANA, CANDIDATE FOR VICE PRESIDENT: But that didn't matter.

But at my first conference my mentor and cooperating teacher, Bruce Robb, the longtime treasurer of NCSS, asked me to join the board, and from that moment on I have found a home in this organization. It has afforded me opportunities far beyond what I could have imagined as a young social studies teacher from Apple Valley, Minnesota.

At my first NCSS conference I fell in with a good crowd, including Steven Goldberg, Barbara Hairfield, Diane Hart, Kim O'Neil, Bob Dytell, and later on my wife, Karen Burgard. Together we have been on many committees and we've had quite a few adventures.

Since that time, at the state conference in Minneapolis, NCSS has been an integral part of my professional and personal life. As a Minneapolis public schools teacher for 18 years I have taught all the social studies, served as department chair, and been a program coordinator. I have taught middle school, high school, online courses, adult diploma, GED, and social studies methods in universities.

Previously I was president of the Minnesota Council for the Social Studies, an NCSS board member, and served on various committees. Whoa, now it's getting loud. Today I'm president of the Indiana council, where I\x92m working to increase membership at both state and in the national organization.

Going forward into the future, NCSS must meet the needs of less-experienced teachers and bring them into the organization, through a few ways: personal connections, professional development, and mentorship. We can also reach them through technology and we can help them connect with others. We can make their lives easier and we can help them to do an even better job at preparing tomorrow's citizens.

At the same time, we will continue to advocate for social studies at the national and state levels. We will continue to provide curricular support and professional development for teachers and provide a space for research and innovation in the teaching of social studies as a discipline.

Connecting research to practice. This new era of reform and privatization brings new challenges and new opportunities, but the future belongs to those who can meet those challenges and shape their own destinies. For nearly 100 years, NCSS has been the premier organization for social studies teachers.

I stand here today because people believed that through education we can build a better, more democratic nation and world. So I ask for your vote, and together we will meet that future and build that future. Thank you.

[Applause.]

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: Kim O'Neil from New York.

KIM O\x92NEIL, NEW YORK, CANDIDATE FOR VICE PRESIDENT: Good afternoon, President Moore, Madam Chairman, and my fellow delegates at HOD. I'm Kim O'Neil and I am running for the office of vice president. And I'm very proud to say that I'm a national board certified elementary teacher, and I teach social studies.

[Applause.]

KIM O\x92NEIL, NEW YORK, CANDIDATE FOR VICE PRESIDENT: Amazing. I've been a classroom teacher for 35 years in Liverpool, New York, a suburban school district in Upstate New York. And during my first four years I taught social studies at the middle school level, but the majority of my career has been spent teaching social studies in a self-contained, all-inclusive elementary classroom.

And today that\x92s one of the toughest jobs in the field of education since \x97 teaching social studies at the elementary is, well, as you know, under attack. I know this personally because in my 3rd grade classroom my administrator walked in one day and said, you know, Kim, no one cares if you teach any social studies. After all, it's not part of our school's report card and there are no state tests required, so it's just not important. That's a true story.

How can the fundamental structures of a democratic nation be sustained when the foundation is not being built? It's just mind-boggling. If the Cold War as still going on, I would think that this was a plan of enemy espionage. For how can our political leaders support an education act that doesn't support the teaching of social studies? It's an oxymoron.

[Applause.]

KIM O\x92NEIL, NEW YORK, CANDIDATE FOR VICE PRESIDENT: I\x92m currently completing my second term as the elementary representative on the NCSS board of directors, and I've been president of the New York State council and my local Central New York council.

I also sit on the alumni board for the School of Education at my alma mater, SUNY Potsdam. And one of my passions has been international educational exchange, and I helped to form the international visitors committee of NCSS.

In addition, I've been a fellow of several international study travel programs to Europe and Asia. And I'm one of the authors of the new Gerda [ph] Institute books on the teaching about Germany. I'm also the teacher liaison for the Syracuse University's Moynihan Institute for Global Studies.

And recently I was appointed one of 16 educators to serve on the New York State Social Studies Curriculum Advisory Panel to the Commissioner of Education and the Board of Regents to redefine the social studies frameworks K-12 and align them with the common core.

I will bring my varied skills and experience of leadership to the VP position. But most importantly, I will bring a first-hand understanding of the current plight that social studies is facing. My years of teaching have solidified my understanding of the adage attributed to this ancient Greek philosopher, Heraclitus, "Nothing endures but change," but who would have ever thought that the teaching of social studies would be compromised and completely eliminated in some elementary classrooms across the U.S.? As social studies educators, we may feel that we've lost some ground. We may feel that we've lost some battles. But I believe that every one of us sitting out there today know that to lose the war it's just not an option, just not an option.

Under the NCSS umbrella, our diverse discipline allows us to unite and bring forth the clear message that social studies is a core subject. So what can we do? We do what we do best. We teach social studies. But outside the classrooms, teach the public what's going on, teach our colleagues ways to participate in the charge, and teach our political leaders that without social studies, there would be no "they." My opening line at the next meeting with my local congressman is going to be this: If you voted in the November 6th election, thank a social studies teacher.

I feel passionately that by continuing with the united front, continuing to communicate effectively, and continuing to do what we do best, teach the purpose of social studies, we will be heard. So let us not just fear this time but embrace it as an opportunity for us to make social studies education be in the forefront of the minds of our educational policymakers. We can do it together. Thank you.

[Applause.]

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: Okay, now we go to the elementary school representatives for the board. Ladies, you have three minutes each. We'll start with Kim Heckart.

KIMBERLY HECKART, IOWA, CANDIDATE FOR NCSS BOARD: Good afternoon. I am Kim Heckert, a 3rd grade teacher from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, who has focused on teaching and learning for the past 22 years. I believe the time is now with the core curriculum for social studies to maintain its impact in education and continue to rank it with the same importance as other content areas.

Kids need to know what it means to be a citizen, citizens who take an active role in their community, in the city, their state, their country, and our world. I have been actively involved with two local museum education boards in my community. I teach a social studies methods course at the University of Iowa to pre-service teachers. And I have also been a lead mentor for a Teaching American History Grant for the past 11 years while researching and implementing best practices with elementary students, pre-service teachers, and veteran teachers.

It is through these experiences that I come to you today as a citizen of the educational world. It is my responsibility to take my next steps in my journey to advocate more for students. Like Martin Luther King, Jr., I have a dream.

I have a dream that every school in America has administrators, school board members and parents who support their children's social studies learning and foster and enable those schools to be the best that they can be. More than ever, we need social studies as an avenue to encourage the context of belonging to where the greater good can and will prevail.

I have a dream today. I have a dream that children can have the support and guidance to become national leaders for America, to have people model integrity, honesty, responsibility, respect, trust, and hope to students so that they know and can do the same.

I have a dream today. I have a dream to use social studies to connect to the students' heritage, build a sense of our country's foundation for freedom and democracy, to give a sense of history and gain 21st century skills to succeed in our global world.


I have a dream today. I have a dream to empower teachers with tools and strategies that promote critical thinking, questioning, and a desire to seek answers, strategies that connect the curriculum rather that isolate it.

I have a dream today. I am honored to stand before you today ready to take the challenge of making these dreams come true. United we must stand to advocate for the future of our students with social studies at the forefront. Thank you for your time.

[Applause.]

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: And now we have Ruth King from Utah.

RUTH KING, UTAH, CANDIDATE FOR NCSS BOARD: My name is Ruth King and I'm a 5th grade teacher in Alpine School District in Utah where I'm in my 27th year of teaching, all of which have been in 5th and 6th grade, with the majority of my class sizes ranging from 32 to 36.

Growing up I was very blessed by my parents. My mother, who had been a librarian in the Ogden Utah children's section before marrying my father, shared with me and modeled a love of learning, reading, and history. My father, an Idaho dairy farmer, gave me a love of nature and the out-of-doors, and also instilled in me a great geographic sense of bearing and direction.

Most of our students today are not as lucky as I was to be given those social studies foundations in their own homes. That\x92s where our roles as teachers become important. We can mentor and model what it means to engage in social studies. Colleagues can mentor each other and share excellent teaching strategies.

Teacher organizations such as the Utah Council for the Social Studies, or the other state associations or councils, and the NCSS provide us as teachers professional development opportunities that can help drive our own passion and enthusiasm for social studies and give us the tools to pass that new content on to our students.

I am a member of the Utah Council for the Social Studies and was presented its Elementary Teacher of the Year Award in March of 2011. Last December, in Washington D.C., I was extremely honored to receive the National Council for the Social Studies Outstanding Elementary Teacher of the year for 2011.

While in the District of Columbia, I led a group of Utah educators to visit with all five of our Utah congressional delegates on Capitol Hill. Later, in February, I spearheaded a follow-up meeting with one of the Utah senator's state office to keep a dialogue alive, and I promise I will continue to do that.

Currently I am serving as a member of the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Mentor Advisory Group, the secretary of and the steering committee member for the Utah Geographic Alliance, and a master teacher and in-service trainer for the Alpine School District Teaching American History Grant.

As you can tell, over the past many years I've tried to make things better for my students as well as my fellow teaching colleagues. I was pleased to help prepare for this year's conference by being a member of the planning committee meetings held here in Seattle last April, and to help select presentations that I felt would be most beneficial for the elementary teachers attending this year's conference.

I've worked tirelessly within my district and my state to promote good teaching and help create and encourage the professional opportunities for teachers. I have learned from personal experience that if teachers are given the support they need, social studies will be taught effectively.

I encourage you to read my position statement online on the NCSS website and to visit with me in person. I would consider it a privilege to represent the elementary teachers on the NCSS National Board, and I would appreciate your vote. And have a great day.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: We talked up at the podium and we decided we're going to do an impromptu advertisement. We do not have two nominations for the assignments committee. We only have one and we need two. The assignments committee is the group of people who get applications countrywide for individuals who want to spend their time working on an operations committee such as awards or other committees that you saw the delegate \x97 or the slate passed earlier.

So if you'd be interested in being in the assignments committee \x97 I see one coming up here. We didn't have to twist any arms. If there are anyone else that are interested, we'll give you five more minutes to fill out the paper and bring it up. Thank you.

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: Okay, under the secondary school, Mikki Maddoz is not here, and so Anton Schulski from Colorado.

ANTON SCHULSKI, COLORADO, CANDIDATE FOR NCSS BOARD: I don\x92t get six minutes, do I? Okay.

President Moore, members of the board of directors, Past-President Blanchette, and members of the House of Delegates, my fellow candidates, I love coming here, and I love talking to my students as I'm getting ready to come every year. And tell them, you know, I'm going to meet with several thousand other social studies teachers.

And of course their response is somewhat appropriate on their part, and they wonder, what do you do at these kind of things? And when I tell them that part of what we do is to meet here in the House of Delegates and actually conduct the business of the association, it really begins to kind of give them an introduction to what we do.

Now, I'm honored to stand before you as the candidate for the Board for Secondary Teachers. I've been fortunate to work with a good many of you in the past few years \x97 my friends from the Colorado council, members of the candidate community, as well as members of the LGBTAQ and allies communities \x97 all of those people, as well as members of the HOD steering committee, have really been a source of professional support over the last few years.

Now, even though I live in Colorado, I have to say that I'm a proud son of New Jersey. And over the past few weeks the events there have really torn at my heart. My heart and our thoughts of course go out to all of the people who have been impacted by Superstorm Sandy. It was New Jersey's own Bruce Springsteen who wrote a song many years ago called "The Ties that Bind." And that really, to me, resonates in terms of what we really try to do here within not only the house but within the NCSS. We will strive to connect with each other and our students along the way.

I would like to help continue to make NCSS and to reach out to all of our constituents, including current members, and especially, as I mentioned earlier, our newest teachers. I believe our organization is the wonderful blend of both experience and exuberance, and we are able to work with those new professionals together that vibrancy is the key to sustaining excellence in the classroom, as well as the organization. I'm eager to develop those mentorships, those ties that bind, to lead to innovative ideas in the classroom using experience and exuberance to be truly transformative.

Now, when I entered the profession some 30 years ago, we\x92ve had a lot of things that have impacted us along the way. And I believe as we come together as social studies professionals we'll continue to meet these challenges with a renewed sense of vision and purpose. In the second decade of the 21st century it's crucial that we look to the future with 20/20 vision. We must continue to make our vision clear to the public, politicians and, most importantly, amongst ourselves. As we look forward to the year 2020, it is our collective vision for the future to move our disciplines to the fore of the educational debate.

I welcome your support for the board of directors and look forward to working with you again in the future. Thank you.

[Applause.]

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: The next category we have is the K-12 teacher at large. First one, Bev Smith from Texas.

BEV SMITH, TEXAS, CANDIDATE FOR NCSS BOARD: For those of you who were here last year, I'm back. My name is Beverly Smith. And I was born in West Virginia, I lived six months in Florida, I lived 24 years in Indiana, and I've lived in Texas since 1981. And I have served social studies education for the last 28 years as a middle school and high school educator. Currently I am the secondary social studies curriculum specialist for Lovejoy ISD in Lucas, Texas. Don't you just love that name, Lovejoy? It's just north of Dallas.

I also teach in my position as curriculum specialist. I teach world geography and AP European history. My involvement with NCSS began in 1985 when I first became a member of the Plano Council for the Social Studies. I served as president of PCSS and board rep to the Texas council. In the Texas council I've been a member of the technology, curriculum, teacher standards, membership, and conference committees.

In 2009, as founder of the Lovejoy Council for the Social Studies, I chaired the state conference committee. At that time I was also president of the Texas Social Studies Supervisors Association. I don't recommend doing that job \x97 doing those two things together. It was a really great year but it was an exhausting one. In January I will become president of the Texas Council for the Social Studies.

As vice president and president-elect of the TCSS, I spearheaded a membership campaign called Just One. If elected I will work tirelessly to bring that campaign to NCSS. There is strength in numbers and that is what we need in this organization.

Please stand and raise your right hand. Please stand and raise your right hand, everyone. Okay, repeat after me: I promise to bring \x97

ATTENDEES: I promise to bring \x97

BEV SMITH, TEXAS, CANDIDATE FOR NCSS BOARD: \x97 just one new member \x97

ATTENDEES: \x97 just one new member \x97

BEV SMITH, TEXAS, CANDIDATE FOR NCSS BOARD: \x97 to NCSS in 2013.

ATTENDEES: \x97 to NCSS in 2013.

BEV SMITH, TEXAS, CANDIDATE FOR NCSS BOARD: Thank you, and go get 'em.

[Applause.]

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: Charles Vaughn from South Carolina.

CHARLES VAUGHN, SOUTH CAROLINA, CANDIDATE FOR NCSS BOARD: Good evening. Last night \x97 I'm Charles Vaughn from South Carolina. I have a speech prepared, but last night kind of changed it. I had an opportunity to go to the movies to see "To Kill a Mockingbird." It was a one-night screening honoring the 50th anniversary of Harper Lee's classic novel.

And one line stood out among many things in the movie, but at the end of the trial scene \x97 and Jem and Scout and Dill go home. They're devastated. Their father has lost this trial, this case. And the neighbor comes across to talk to the children. And she says to them, you don't understand it now but you will one day that there are people in towns who are picked to do difficult jobs.

And I believe that as educators we have all been picked to do difficult jobs that our neighbors don't really realize how difficult our jobs are. And we face on a daily basis children who are homeless, who have sometimes terminal diseases, who come from fractured homes. You know, the list goes on and on. And our neighbors don't really know that. They don't see that.

So as an educator I think we all need to do a better job of highlighting what we do to help our communities and our nation to understand really what we do and how we need to advocate better for the children that we have in our classrooms, and to advocate for our profession as a whole.

So I appreciate your consideration for my candidacy as an at-large board member. Thank you.

[Applause.]

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: Okay, the final category we have is the general at-large, and the first candidate is Elizabeth Hinde from Arizona.

ELIZABETH HINDE, ARIZONA, CANDIDATE FOR NCSS BOARD: Yes, we're almost done. Good afternoon. I am Liz Hinde from Arizona, but I do have a confession: I have represented this body as Arizona in CUFA, but I'm a Jersey girl. And so, like Anton, my heart goes out to Jersey. And I'm from Atlantic City. So most of my family evacuated but I had two that decided they could handle it. And you know what? They did.

I am a little familiar with this podium. Like I said, since I've been a delegate for almost a decade and I was steering committee chair like Maria is, it is my pleasure and a real honor to be back here again. I decided to make a run for the board of directors because I want to represent social studies teachers. I want to represent you and actually all teachers, all teachers who have a passion for social studies, even those who don't know what it is. We in this room know the value of social studies, that it is the heart and soul of our schools.

I was an elementary school teacher for 20 years \x97 actually elementary and middle school. I taught 5th and 6th grade for 20 years. Now I crossed over to the dark side and I'm a college professor. And I'm really on the dark side because I became an administrator, at least for now. But those years I spent as a real teacher, they are what shaped my perspective. They are what shaped my philosophy that I bring to my dealings with state, national leaders, anybody \x97 my college, my students and the board of directors.

Now, we all know the issues facing social studies. And if you don't, there's people around here that can help you. There are issues that we face every day, issues like the marginalization of social studies so that all tested subjects get more curriculum time, issues like the lack of quality and affordable resources, issues like poor teacher training, and other things that take up our time and energy.

But one of my biggest criticisms is that I\x92m an optimist, because I don't want to hear about the issues anymore, to tell you the truth. I want to hear about what we're doing about it, and I see social studies is turning the corner. We are beginning to have \x97 there's glimmers of hope that social studies is beginning to get a little more prominence with the relaxation of AYP, with people contacting me saying, can you help our social studies team that's been lost in the desert for the last 10 years?

The problem, though, is that people don't \x97 these marginalization\x92s, these issues \x97 I thought I had two minutes left \x97 these issues are symptoms of a bigger problem. The bigger problem is that people don't understand what social studies is. It's not a repository of facts to help you do well in the game of "Jeopardy." It's not about teaching kids the states, wars, and map-reading.

Not enough people \x97 it's about creating informed, participating, rational, and humane citizens of our society and of the world. No one disagrees with that purpose but not enough people know about it. Not enough people see the link between what we're doing in the classroom and this broader purpose.

It's not just a matter of lobbing legislators, although that's important. Don\x92t put it aside. But it is a matter of getting our message out to other teachers, to parents, to neighbors, to everyone around us. We are important and what we're doing is important.

I would like to use the board of directors as a forum to communicate this purpose to a broader audience. I'd like to use this position and any other position I have to advocate for you and others like you who know what social studies is and understand its purpose and its potential to make a difference. You who fight the good fight every day and deserve recognition, it would be my honor to serve you.

[Applause.]

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: The next candidate, Shannon Pugh from Maryland.

SHANNON PUGH, MARYLAND, CANDIDATE FOR NCSS BOARD: Good afternoon. My name is Shannon Pugh and currently I serve as the secondary social studies specialist in Anne Arundel County Public Schools in Annapolis, Maryland. Part of that, I worked for 10 years in Dallas ISD as a high school social studies teacher.

Recently, while waiting for a flight in Baltimore, a woman who was obviously distraught sat next to me. In her hand she clutched a condolence book. And after a few friendly exchanges I learned her name was Mary and that she had recently buried her husband in Arlington. Her husband received full military honors, and her face lit up as she told me this.

She then began to tell me the history of Arlington National Cemetery, who was buried there, how it was established, and details and facts about the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Mary had no idea that I was a social studies teacher. She needed to talk so I listened, and she passionately shared her knowledge of U.S. and world history with me.

At one point during Mary's history lesson, she abruptly stopped and said: I just get so mad. My grandson doesn't know any of this. They don't teach this in school anymore. She then began to question how this lack of knowledge on the part of her grandson, how this was going to affect him actually knowing his grandfather and what his grandfather stood for.

About that time calls for flights were made and so we parted ways. And now I find myself in front of you today, really thinking of Mary. Everyone in this room is passionate about social studies, and to us it is professional and personal. But sometimes we might forget that to people not directly involved in social studies, like Mary, it can be very, very personal as well.

Mary never used the words "narrowing of the curriculum" or "marginalization of social studies" but she verbalized very well what the lack of social studies education in this country means, and to her it meant losing the past.

As an organization we know this and we fight for social studies every day, but we have a long and hard road to fight, especially if we try to keep doing it alone. We need to continue to wage a public relations campaign to get policy makers and educational leaders to embrace the social studies and understand its relevance to the lives of our children and adults and to quit seeing social studies as a support course for others.

We need to work to ensure that our voices in our profession are together and that we recruit others, recruit people like Mary. And I hope that if I'm in this position, I can help do that. Thank you.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: At this time I'd like to thank Sue Blanchette very much for the work of the nominations and elections committee, and for the strong slate of candidates for the 2013 elections and the future leadership of the NCSS. Thank you, Sue.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Now here comes the fun. This is the time that we want to introduce the candidates for HOD committees.

I would like to invite my steering committee members to have their little signs. Do you guys have a sign that says steering committee and assignment committee and resolutions committee? We're going to turn the microphones around and we're going to ask the nominees to come up to a microphone and to introduce themselves and the council that they're from.

So, Gloria, you need one sign. Charles needs a sign. Okay, well, we've got people in the back that will help \x97 Ana and Jordan. Do you have all the names on one side or three sides?

ATTENDEE: They're all on one side. I put them all on one.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Good. Good work.

If your name is up on a slide, you are a nominee. If you're a nominee for assignment committee, Gloria has the sign. Actually it's Ana holding the sign. Please go over to Ana. If you're a nominee for the resolutions committee, Charles is holding a sign. Please go over there. And if you are a steering committee nominee, go over to Kathy. She's holding a sign.

Again, no speeches please. Today we would like to know who you are and what your affiliation is, whether it be a council, an associated group, or a community. Let's start with \x97 woops, we've got flying things. Let's start with the steering committee, candidates for the steering committee first.

MELISSA COLLUM, WISCONSIN, NCSS BOARD OF DIRECTORS/STEERING COMMITTEE CANDIDATE: Melissa Collum, Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies, NCSS board of directors.

KEN DE MASI, ARIZONA, STEERING COMMITTEE CANDIDATE: Ken de Masi, Arizona Council for the Social Studies.

TIM POTTS, NEW YORK, STEERING COMMITTEE CANDIDATE: Tim Potts, president of New York State Council for the Social Studies.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Thank you. And those are your nominees for the steering committee. Tomorrow when you come into the HOD we'll have a write-up, what these individuals shared on their nomination form, so that you can read more about them.

At this time, Charles, you have the resolutions committee, candidates for the resolutions committee.

DIANE BRANTLEY, ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE CANDIDATE: My name is Diane Brantley. I'm the co-chair of the assessment community.

BRAD BURENHEIDE. KANSAS, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE CANDIDATE: I'm Brad Burenheide, Kansas Council for the Social Studies.

SCOTT NOET, MINNESOTA, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE CANDIDATE: I'm Scott Noet, Minnesota Council for the Social Studies.

LYNN ROMERO, NEW MEXICO, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE CANDIDATE: Lynn Romero, New Mexico Council for the Social Studies.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Thank you. Those are your nominees for the resolutions committee.

Last but not least, the assignment committee. If you would please introduce yourself.

GLORIA MCELROY, TENNESSEE, STEERING COMMITTEE: I'm Gloria McElroy, Tennessee Council for the Social Studies.

ROZELLA CLYDE, ATSS/UFT, ASSIGNMENT COMMITTEE CANDIDATE: I'm Rozella Clyde, once known as Kirchgaessner, Association of Teachers of Social Studies, UFT, New York State Council for the Social Studies.

JOHN HINES, WASHINGTON, ASSIGNMENT COMMITTEE CANDIDATE: My name is John Hines and I'm the vice president of the Washington State Council for the Social Studies. Welcome to the Pacific Northwest.

JEROME HOYNES, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNMENT COMMITTEE CANDIDATE: My name is Jerome Hoynes and I currently serve as \x97 enthusiastically as the Illinois council president.

[Laughter.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Thank you. Those are your candidates for the assignment committee.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: We have a special treat for you. One moment. We have a special treat for you today. As a member of the \x97 being the chair of the steering committee, I'm also on the board of directors by nature of this position, and I had the unique privilege of being part of a legislative report and a sharing of information as well as visiting my Congress representatives in D.C. at the last board meeting this past September.

And at that time I met Catriona McDonald. And at this time we're going to ask her to come on up and give a report for us as to what's going on in D.C. Please welcome her.

[Applause.]

CATRIONA MCDONALD, NCSS LEGISLATIVE CONSULTANT: Thank you. It's a long walk from the back of the room. I thought I started on time but I was a little slow.

Good afternoon, and thank you so much for allowing me just a couple of minutes to talk about our future path together now that the elections are behind us and working to promote the social studies in Washington, D.C.

It's been really inspiring to me to hear all of the candidates coming up and speaking, because we have so many passionate, articulate advocates for the social studies, and we need to make sure that our decision makers at the local level, at the state level, and particularly at the federal level hear those messages, whether we take those messages to them in Washington, D.C. or they are hearing from you at home in their communities, your communities, in their congressional districts.

This election has been described by many as a status quo election because it returned President Obama to the White House and the same parties took control of the House and Senate. I am very hopeful and feel like there are many signs to suggest that we're going to have some new opportunities in the next two years to pass legislation that has been log-jammed over the last two years, in some cases longer than that.

Obviously the partisan freeze that has blocked legislation in Congress is not going to melt in a great flood, but there are certainly signs that the parties are beginning to come together and hopefully work together in a way that has not been possible over the last couple of years. So what do we need to be doing as the NCSS and as social studies teachers and leaders in our communities to take advantage of any potential thaws and maybe apply a little heat to help melt that ice?

I think there are three things that we need to be focused on and working on. One is relationship building. We want to make sure that we are not talking to congressional decision makers and their staffs just once ever year or once every two years when we think there's something we would like to have in the elementary and secondary education act, or when they're getting ready to submit funding requests to Congress.

We need to be developing relationships so that when there is an issue related to social studies that congressional members are making decisions on, or your state leaders are making decisions about, that they know who you are and they are picking up the phone or sending an e-mail to check in with you to ask what the impact would be on students and schools in their districts. You know you have arrived in developing those relationships when they are coming to you to use you as a resource.

So how do you make that happen? You do that by getting in touch, by requesting opportunities to sit down and meet with them in the home community if you can't go to Washington or to your state capital, inviting them to come and see innovative and exciting things that you're doing in the classroom on your school campus, inviting them to be a part of those innovative and exciting things that you are doing.

Staying in touch with articles, information about what's going on at home that is going to be useful to them in doing their jobs in the state legislature or in Washington, D.C., but that they might have a hard time accessing or knowing about because they are too far away. If there's an article in the paper that talks about something that's relevant, if there is a business leader who's got a quote talking about something that relates to social studies, clip it out and stick it in an e-mail and send it off to your representative or to the staff person who handles this issue.

It is as important to develop relationships with the key staff who are advising your legislators on these issues as it is to develop a relationship with the legislators themselves. If you don't know who the person is in Washington, D.C. who is handling education issues for your two United States senators and your representative, pick up the phone, call the office, ask for the name, get the correct spelling and the e-mail address, and develop a relationship with that person so that you can be a resource.

We also want to make sure that we're developing networks of support, not just social studies teachers who are advocating for social studies. That is critically important, but it also feels a little self-interested and we need to bring to our defense folks from other communities who value the social studies.

This is how STEM got itself back on the radar screen for funding and political priority in Washington, D.C. It wasn't because the math teachers and the science teachers were talking about the importance of science technology engineering and mathematics, although they did that and they did that very effectively. But the money didn't flow. The priority on the teaching of STEM didn't happen in Washington, D.C. until the business community rallied and started to talk about how important it was for students to be graduating with those skills.

Now, I would posit \x97 and I think that you would agree with me \x97 that the critical thinking skills that are taught through the social studies are as important to employers in hiring highly qualified and productive employees as math and science. But they don't view it through that lens, and we need to work on building our network of other advocates who can work with us to come to the defense of the social studies.

We also want to think about our message and how can we find messengers who go with messages that are going to be persuasive to members of Congress? And that message is not the same for a liberal Democrat from San Francisco and a conservative Republican from Oklahoma.

Having said that, social studies is critically important to the future of our democracy. We know that and there are people in Washington who acknowledge that as well. And that's why the co-sponsors of the Sandra Day O'Connor act, for example, are a conservative Republican from Oklahoma and a liberal Californian from the Bay area.

We have messages that both Republican conservatives and liberal Democrats can and do respond to. We need to make sure that we are refining those messages and matching our messages to our political audience. But as one of the candidates said, if ever there were an audience, legislators who care enough about civics and our representative democracy to want to do that professionally should be a natural audience for us.

And at the end of the day, the most successful approach, the single most important thing we can do to help refocus attention on the social studies, is increase the noise. We need our own community, our parents, our teachers and others who care about the social studies to be talking more and more loudly. In a democracy, it's boots on the ground that make the difference at the end of the day, and we need to start marching together. Thank you so much.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Catriona, do you want to come up and answer a question? We have time for one.

There's a microphone over here in the aisle.

JIM LANE, OHIO: Okay. I'm Jim Lane from the council from Ohio, Ohio Council for the Social Studies. I would personally like to thank you on our behalf, if I can, for the work that you're doing and what NCSS is doing. And I would ask you, as a service to all those others who are our membership who aren't here \x97 we can reach some of them \x97 would you do two things for us?

One, would you consider doing an article \x97 a short article outlining the same things that you talked about that could appear in either the Social Studies Professional or in Social Education, or both, and the middle school publication for young learners as well?

And then, secondly, recraft that information and send it in a slightly different form to each of the state councils so that we can put it in our publications, we can reach our people, and we can also work with our legislative advocates and to link you and NCSS and our advocates at the state level together.

[Applause.]

CATRIONA MCDONALD, NCSS LEGISLATIVE CONSULTANT: Thank you very much for those suggestions. And one of the things that the government relations committee has been talking about at this conference and working on is tools that we can be providing from the central office to help you do this work both in Washington and at home.

I hope that everybody picked up, as you came in, a couple of documents that were put together. And Michelle Herczog is waving them around because I don\x92t have them up here. There is a set of talking points that we have put together about the importance of the social studies. They are \x97 thank you \x97 broad and generic enough that you should be able to use them both at the state level and at the federal level.

And then we have also put together a document on our federal legislative priorities. So this is specific to what we would like to do in Washington legislation and our asks in D.C., but the white sheet that has the advocacy related meetings and this conference on the backside has a set of generic points and information that you can use to promote the social studies.

Again, at the state level or the federal level, they're designed to work with Democrats or Republicans. But again, it's not a script. You should take that information, meld it and craft it to \x97 you know, again, to match your audience.

The government relations committee is also talking about additional tools that might be helpful, whether it's videos that we could post on YouTube, how-tos to find your member of Congress, how to find your congressional staff that are working on these. If there are other tools like that that would be helpful, Brian Traxler is the chair of the government relations committee. Please feel free to send your suggestions to him or to the NCSS staff. We want to do everything we can to help you do this important work. Thank you.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: And last but not least I'd like to invite the chair of FASSE, Fred Isely, up to the podium to give us an update on FASSE and what's going on.

I surfed the Internet and I found all the pictures that you saw today, including the 1920s bathing suit pictures of Seattle Beach.

FRED ISELY, ILLINOIS, CHAIR, FASSE BOARD: By the way, this is before I had my stroke in July. So anyway, I'm with Rocky the Leatherneck, Western Illinois University. By the way, it's just wonderful to be looking at all of you. Yeah, you\x92re saying "stroke"? Yeah, about four or five days ago the lights went back on. I'm pitching for Mayo Clinic here.

But anyway, first of all, could I have Terry Trimble, members of our FASSE committee, stand and be recognized? Terry Trimble from the Florida council. Peggy Jackson from the New Mexico council. Marvin \x97 I don't know if you're out there \x97 Marvin Awbrey from the California council. I don\x92t know if he's here. Bob Dytell from New York council, please stand. And Steve Sato [ph], if he's here, from Massachusetts council.

Brenda Luper, our financial director, who did outstanding work for FASSE, you know, please \x97 and by the way, if there is anyone here that's served on the FASSE committee, could you please stand and be recognized? And if all of you could just say thank you very much.

[Applause.]

FRED ISELY, ILLINOIS, CHAIR, FASSE BOARD: I cannot really give a report because we\x92re giving \x97 today\x92s deliberations are being forwarded to the NCSS board meeting Sunday morning, but it\x92s a very happy picture for FASSE, I\x92ll be honest with you. We\x92re reinstating all the awards, the Christa McAuliffe award. There will be more information that\x92s forthcoming in the publications, but it\x92s all very, very happy information.

Also Brenda Luper\x92s outstanding work in providing a financial framework that will firewall a lot of financial investments in FASSE for the future. It was outstanding and that information will be forthcoming. But like I said, it\x92s all formative information right now and it will be with you on our next e-mail out to all of you.

One thing I\x92d have to say in running for this particular position \x97 and thank you for your vote two years ago \x97 is the fact that I really think that, you know, playing tag team with our previous presenter \x97 and I can\x92t even pronounce your name, Ms. McDonald \x97 but anyway \x97 your first name \x97 the idea of putting a FASSE at each state and affiliated council would be a great idea, not only politically but also with your heritage groups.

I know tomorrow at our Great Lakes breakfast we\x92re going to be submitting about 600 heritage sites throughout all seven states. I mean, it\x92s not a bad thing for you to knock on the door of the Field Museum and say, can we work together in a partnership, Shedd Aquarium. Or for that matter go to McDonald \x92s or Boeing or Allstate or Caterpillar or John Deere, all the big groups here in Illinois.

But for that matter \x97 I\x92ve got one minute \x97 but to be honest with you, I would highly recommend this FASSE NCSS to spread out through all of us so that you \x97 and by the way, if you would like a framework on how that\x92s done, please talk with Terry Trimble who\x92s actually \x97 as a matter of fact, through Terry\x92s leadership I think \x97 I don\x92t know how many hundreds of thousands of dollars have come through the Florida council. You might want to talk with him about generating that amount of funds.

Thirty seconds. Do any of you have any questions about this picture, by the way?

[Laughter.]

FRED ISELY, ILLINOIS, CHAIR, FASSE BOARD: People, thank you very much.

[Applause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you so much, Fred, for your comprehensive and detailed report as it relates to FASSE.

At this time I would like to thank each and every one of you for the time and your patience that you have contributed to our first session of the 56th Session of the House of Delegates Meeting.

I would like to ask, are there any announcements from the floor? Any announcements? All right, hearing none I have one announcement. I invite each and every one of you to the presidential reception that will take place from 6:45 to 8:45 in the Cirrus Ballroom, 35th floor, Sheraton Hotel, Pike Street Tower tonight. I would love to have you and to meet with you. And so each of you are cordially invited to that reception tonight.

And I would like to remind you that the House of Delegates next session begins at 8:00 a.m. sharp tomorrow. Voting will take place tomorrow at 8:30 a.m. sharp. And I would like for you to be sure to allow time to be credentialed prior to the beginning of the House of Delegates session.

You want to include exact criteria for voting for HOD committee members. Be sure that you check and register. Reference your House of Delegates manual for elections to steering, resolutions and assignment committees.

At this time I'm taking my cellphone \x97 tradition \x97 this is a tradition. And my cell phone is more accurate than my watch.

[Laughter.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: And according to my watch, I have 5:42. And so you need to adjust your watch accordingly to 5:42. And we will begin according to this time at 8:00 a.m. sharp, according to my watch. And so as \x97 8:43 now \x97 I consider this meeting adjourned. Thank you.

[Applause.]

National Council for the Social Studies

Fifty-Sixth Annual House of Delegates

Seattle, Washington

Second Session

8:00 through 10:15 a.m.

Saturday, November 17, 2012

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: A this time if you would please take your seats. Check your cellphones. Make sure they're on silent or off. And if still have a blue credential card, would you please make sure that the persons at the door have that card of yours? Thank you. We will be starting momentarily.

[Pause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: At this time if you would please take your seats. I have a few logistical announcements to make before we get started today. And I'll explain this further after the beginning of the agenda today.

Due to the logistics of this room, this facility, and having written ballots, we can't have people just going in and out of the room all of the time, okay? Obviously if you have a personal emergency and you need to leave, you may, okay, but we don't want ballots wandering around the facility, if that makes sense.

So right now you all have a blue ballot. We're actually going to use that and vote in about a half an hour. I wanted to give you some time to read through the ballot, read through the credentials, but that's why we don't want you to leave the facility in the next half an hour, 45 minutes, because those ballots are out and they need to be collected and counted.

In the second half of today we're going to vote on resolutions, and we're going to try a voice vote first, a standing vote second if that doesn't work, but thirdly a ballot vote if necessary. And at that time, when ballots are out, we cannot let people in and out obviously, because we can\x92t have ballots wandering around the halls.

So time your personal needs perhaps so that if you need to take a break it would be between balloting, but know that you're going to miss part of the program and explanation if you do. So the doors are not locked and you may not leave, but we prefer that you try to stay here because it will confuse the voting process. Thank you.

Without further ado, I would like to introduce again a man that needs no introduction, our president, John Moore.

[Applause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you, Maria, and welcome, my House of Delegates colleagues, to the second session of our 56th Annual House of Delegates Meeting. Thank you for a very productive and timely session yesterday. And it is my hope that all matters go smoothly today and we will dismiss at a very appropriate time.

I would like to remind you that House of Delegates members should turn in open-ended comments on the evaluation forms at the end of today's session to your delegate chair. And the steering committee members, those who are floating members out on the floor, there will be a time when Maria, the chair, will ask her colleagues on the steering committee to pick up the evaluation forms.

The evaluation forms are very helpful for Mr. Rick Daniel next year, who will be chair, to collect data and information on how to improve the sessions for our 57th annual delegates meeting in St. Louis, Missouri. Your evaluation forms are the goldenrod paper in the House of Delegates packet, the goldenrod paper.

At this time I would like to introduce my fine colleague and friend, Susan Griffin, the executive director of the National Council for Social Studies. And Susan will present to us her executive director's message and financial report.

Susan?

[Applause.]

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: Good morning, everyone. Just to say that we had a very good fiscal year last year because many of you who are here also went to Washington, D.C. for our wonderful conference that Sue Blanchette headed up.

We ended the fiscal year very strongly. Brenda Luper is going to give you a more detailed report to talk about the finances of the organization, what our revenue and expenses look like in various categories, but just to say that the Virginia Council for the Social Studies, the Maryland Council for the Social Studies, and a wonderful team of people, they had a very successful conference last year in Washington, D.C. And since we get a significant amount of our revenue from the conference, that really helped us to have a very healthy year.

I'd like to make note of the fact that we have two new staff members: Jordan Grote, which I think you've seen him \x97 he's that tall guy who looks very, very young; he is very, very young \x97 and Ashant\xE9 Horton, she's been down at the registration desk. Delightful people and very hard workers and smart, smart, smart. So we like having good, dedicated, and smart people working for National Council for the Social Studies.

I wanted to bring to your attention a couple of new efforts, some to directly respond to trying to get more revenue streams and others \x97 just our effort to provide NCSS members with the kind of tools they need to be wonderful at their jobs.

We just started an electronic subscription for libraries. We've been told by a number of our members who are pre-service teachers at universities that, you know what, we don't go to the library anymore; we like to get all of our stuff right on our computer. And we need to have \x97 and the librarians acknowledge that as well. So we need to be able to get an online subscription to our publications, and we've been able to do that.

The charm of that also is that we're charging twice as much for that wonderful opportunity because it's open to all the students who would be at a university and looking at these publications. So we certainly encourage pre-service teachers to continue to join NCSS, but we want to acknowledge that the librarians at universities do want to have online access.

We also started something called the NCSS SmartBrief, which is packed full of really good information. It comes out three times a week. And it keeps people up to date on things that they should know about, and just what's going on at NCSS and around the country.

We are very proud of our new bulletin, "Teaching Reading with the Social Studies Standards." Syd Golston and Peggy Altoff, two past presidents, worked together with Michael Simpson on that publication. We're very proud of that.

It also is making some significant connections because we understand that having ELA standards adopted by 46 states provides social studies with an opportunity to get rich content in our subject areas in the hands of students. And frankly, at the elementary level in particular, that has been a challenge. So that is all going to change.

We also have something that we're very proud of, and that's "Ask a Colleague" that will be placed on the NCSS website where people can pose questions. It doesn't have to be \x97 we're very interested in serving our newest professionals but also we recognize that from time to time you get assigned to a subject that maybe you haven't been steeped in that content area. So it might be an opportunity to post a question about, you know, I'm teaching world geography and I really haven't done that before; what are some good resources? So you'd be able to post that on the NCSS website and get some good answers.

We did a different kind of marketing this year for membership. In addition to our direct mail campaign we did an e-mail campaign, which was lots of fun to do. And we had a special landing page called a pearl [ph]. Who knew? So we're trying to reach out through as many ways possible to put NCSS, the face of NCSS, forward. And I think we're getting better at that all the time.

And there's going to be a session this afternoon, I think, to look at proposals for our international conference in Morocco. We were approached by the Civic Education Group in Morocco to do a joint conference. And that is supposed to happen next June. We're pretty thrilled about that opportunity. Well, it's been a while since we've had an international conference, and they really just couldn't be a stronger partner. So we're pleased about that.

And I wanted to make sure that everyone knows what a fine job that Brenda Luper is doing. Brenda is going to come up here and talk to you about the finances in a bit more detail, as I said. But, you know, sometimes you get this picture of accountant types. They're kind of rigid and not very much fun. Well, Brenda kind of slaps that away because she's very, very good at her job, but she makes us laugh a lot too. So we appreciate that because sometimes when you're talking about the financial statements it's good to have a little levity.

Brenda, why don't you come up and \x97 and let me know if you have any questions, too.

[Applause.]

BRENDA LUPER, NCSS DIRECTOR OF FINANCE: Thank you, Susan. I\x92ll take that as my evaluation this year.

[Laughter.]

BRENDA LUPER, NCSS DIRECTOR OF FINANCE: Thanks for having me here today to present to you the 2011-'12 financial report for the HOD. So next slide; thank you.

As always, when we look at our revenue by program area we see that our conference is almost half of our revenue source for each year that we have money coming in, and followed closely by our membership dues. The rest is made up of book sales, advertising, and our other programs, products, and services, including things like our new Rho Kappa Honor Society. Next.

Over the last two years our conference revenue has done very well. We did well in D.C. We were up 7 percent from two years ago. And last year we had an additional benefit to the bottom line of about $77,000 from conference, which was terrific. [Sneeze from audience.] God bless you.

Our membership dues have increased about 2 percent in the last two years. Our publications are down a little bit. Our subscription revenue is significantly down and our advertising revenue is down.

If you look at the revenue trends over time, you can see that the annual conference, which is our biggest moneymaker, is increasing. Membership, which is our second-biggest moneymaker, after having a dip starting in 2008, has slowly started to come back up a little bit. And our other revenue sources peaked a little bit last year and is now falling a little bit.

Part of that other revenue source has to do with grants that we manage. And the Civic Mission of Schools left our organization last year, so this year we had a little bit of dip in our income this last fiscal year with that leaving us, but now it's coming back so we may have a little bit of an increase in our revenue due to that also.

Okay, if you look at the expenses by category, you will see that conference also spends the most money, at 28 percent. Membership and publications together, which are closely aligned, spend about 30 percent. Administration is about 20 percent, and 20 percent expenses for all of our other programs, products and services.

We have kept our costs low over the last year and we are continuing to be really strict with our expense spending, and that's no joke. Over a two-year period membership expenses have been down 33 percent. Although our conference revenue was up, our conference expenses were down about 2.6 percent.

Our publication expenses have fallen by 17 percent, mostly due to a change in our printing costs. We now have TSSP all electronic only. And we consolidated one issue of social education. And our administrative expenses over a two-year period have fallen 14 percent. Overall, we're down 5 percent in our expenses over a two-year period.

So wherever our savings come from, this is always interesting to look at. Our biggest savings has been overall in salaries and benefits in our membership spending because we did not do any marketing in the last year for membership, but we are doing marketing this year in membership and we have to see an improvement in our member numbers. And our outsourcing and our printing, those are the biggest areas where our expenses have been reduced.

So what does this mean? It means that overall our net assets have improved, and that means all the things that we have and all the things that we owe, what's left over is better than it was before. Overall our assets have increased by 14 percent while our liabilities have dropped 18 percent. So we're doing really well right now.

However, I don't want to give you false hope. We still have a long road to go because NCSS needs to build a reserve fund. We have not done that yet. So we need to continue this kind of net asset improvement over the next several years.

All right, that's it for me. I want to thank you for having me here today. And, yes, question?

ATTENDEE: A couple of years ago members of our executive staff took benefit reductions in order to save this money. Have we replaced them? Are they back on scale?

BRENDA LUPER, NCSS DIRECTOR OF FINANCE: The question is that a couple of years ago staff took salary and benefit reductions and have we replaced those yet? And the answer is no. Because we were coming to Seattle this year, we weren't certain how our conference would do and we didn't feel like our budget could take the extra expense of putting that money back in.

We didn't want to give the staff back their salary and benefits, just to take them away after conference if things didn't go well. What we did instead, with Susan's approval, is we gave staff a bonus at the end of last year and then we promised them at the end of this year when we see how we are doing after the Seattle conference, we start budgeting for the next fiscal year, then we can make that determination.

We will make sure we go through the finance committee and then to the board when we do our budgeting process to get that approval if we feel like we can handle it in our budget. Next year St. Louis, right?

Yes, Michelle?

MICHELLE HERCZOG, CALIFORNIA, NCSS VICE PRESIDENT: Michelle Herczog, vice president of NCSS.

I'm so glad you brought that up. I just want to bring to everyone's attention the enormous amount of work and sacrifice that the NCSS staff commits every single year. They're very short-staffed. You see how commendable and fabulous their work \x97 they always go above and beyond. And it hurts us so that they're sacrificing personally around benefits and salary.

And just to let you know, the NCSS board of directors is very aware of that and it is becoming a priority for us as well. But as you can see from the presentation, revenue is critical and our biggest revenue source is conference. So when we go back, we want to continue to promote enthusiasm for next year's conference in St. Louis and the following year. It's really critical, and thank you for bringing all this to our attention, because it hopefully creates a need for us to really be ambitious about recruiting folks for next year.

So thank you, Brenda, for all your hard work.

[Applause.]

BRENDA LUPER, NCSS DIRECTOR OF FINANCE: One more question and then we're out of time.

GAYLE THIEMAN, INTERNATIONAL ASSEMBLY: Gayle Theiman, representing the International Assembly. I was hoping you could just tell us a little bit more about what a reserve fund means and how individuals in NCSS might contribute to that reserve fund in the future.

BRENDA LUPER, NCSS DIRECTOR OF FINANCE: Okay, I will. A reserve fund is like an insurance policy for economic problems or even for bad decisions. If the organization goes to a location where we don't get the conference revenue that we normally get, having a reserve fund can tide us over without having to draw either staff members' or other programs' products and services that year.

So a reserve fund really is when you make more money than you spend. So what we're really going to do is to continue to make more money than we spend. And we can then set aside some of that money as an insurance policy for future economic problems or challenges that we face.

Now, I'm out of time, but I'm going to be a registration, so if you have any questions, come and see me there. Can we take one more? She said we can take one more.

EUGENE EARSOME, OKLAHOMA, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: I am so grateful. I'm Eugene Earsome with the Oklahoma council and the resolutions committee. And just because it sticks out like a sore thumb, I wanted to ask you, under the expense part, professional services, budgeted at $83,000 in 2010, $70,000 in 2011, and then this past current year $54,000, but the actual amount spent is $204,598. Can you define that for us and tell us why that tremendous increase?

BRENDA LUPER, NCSS DIRECTOR OF FINANCE: Yeah, if I can.

When we have the grant programs, depending on what the particular grant is for, they may have outsourcing. Some of that outsourcing might be just general outsourcing, you know, a survey firm or something like that, but it also could be professional services. And we define that someone who has a particular skill. One of the examples of that might be a lobbying firm.

So if, under our CMS grant, we had a contract \x97 they had a grant contract and in that contract they had lobbying or another professional service, that would increase that during the year that they had that contract.

Now, NCSS' operational professional services has not increased, but it would just be for those grant programs. And it just depends on what the grant is written for as to how those are going to increase.

Okay, see me at registration desk if you have any questions. Thanks to our great board this year. And that's it. John, back to you. Or back to Susan.

[Applause.]

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: We're very pleased to talk about our Each One, Reach One campaign. And one of our candidates, a candidate from Texas, talked about making a pledge that each of us should bring in one member. Well, this group of people on the slide in front of front of you have recruited a number of members. And I'd like to point out that John Moore is on that list. We appreciate that, John Moore. And we expect everyone else in the room today to figure out a way to bring more of us to NCSS.

There is a great deal to be said for having bigger numbers when we go to talk on Capitol Hill. It's more meaningful. And really, the profession is strengthened by having more of us together. We have better ideas, we share more, and it helps the organization be vibrant.

I'd like to say something else about a vibrant organization, and that is that our state councils, our regional councils, our local councils bring so much to NCSS. You are all here because you're part of that network of affiliate organizations, and having those affiliates makes us a stronger organization as well.

So we'd like to talk to you about the Gold and Silver Star councils. As you can see, it's really not easy to be a Silver or a Gold Star. So if you look at these, I think that one of the more significant challenges is having the membership go up every year and increasing the joint membership. Membership and our conference, as Brenda pointed out, are our two main revenue streams.

So we appreciate the help that our affiliates provide by recruiting members on behalf of NCSS, and we try to do the same; recruit members, make them aware of all that you have to offer. So I'd like to talk to you about \x97 announce the Silver councils.

Arizona Council for the Social Studies. And I'll tell you, we have a photo opportunity at the end of this event. So I'm announcing them now but we'll be giving you your certificates at the end and taking your lovely picture. Yes.

ATTENDEE: [Speaking off mic.]

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: So Arizona Council for the Social Studies is Silver Star.

Florida Council for the Social Studies, a consistent strong leader.

Kentucky Council for the Social Studies, congratulations.

New York State Council for the Social Studies, stars everywhere for them.

South Carolina Council for the Social Studies.

Really vibrant, good work going on in our states.

[Applause.]

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: Now, Gold councils have to meet seven of those eight requirements that you saw up on a previous slide. And I want to congratulate the amazing work of our Gold Star councils, and one of them is right in front of me, the Association of Teachers of Social Studies, United Federation of Teachers, congratulations; you are Gold Star.

Colorado Council for the Social Studies, congratulations. You hosted us a couple of years ago and we had such a good time in Denver.

Georgia Council for the Social Studies, they do so much good work and they have a fabulous conference. This year was up significantly from previous year.

One of our hosts for last year, the Maryland Council for the Social Studies, is a Gold Star.

Missouri Council for the Social Studies, we really appreciate the work of the Missouri council and we are going to go visit them next year.

North Carolina Council for the Social Studies \x97

[Applause.]

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: \x97 just outstanding work going on. Get some updates from them online, and they're just doing so much good work.

Ohio Council for the Social Studies. Wasn't Ohio one of those states that was significant in a recent election? Yeah, yeah, Ohio.

[Laughter.]

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: Well, they're also very significant in social studies.

Oklahoma Council for the Social Studies, congratulations, you guys. That's fantastic.

Our neighbors in D.C., Prince George's County Council for the Social Studies, they are such a strong local council. They're on this list every year.

Congratulations, Tennessee Council for the Social Studies. You're Gold Stars. Look at you.

Texas Council for the Social Studies.

[Cheers.]

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: Wow, they're a noisy bunch, too, but they do a lot of good stuff.

[Laughter.]

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies, congratulations. You are wonderful.

So thank you very much for all this hard work, and we will distribute the Gold and Silver Stars and get your lovely pictures taken at the end of this.

Am I done?

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: That's it.

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: All right, that's it for me.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Thank you, Susan.

At this time I want to remind you that you have two forms that you're going to be filling out today, so you can pull them up forward. You have a blue ballot for steering, assignment, and resolution committee, and you also have a yellow goldenrod paper, which is an evaluation paper. During the course of the session today, you're going to be filling both of those out. But before that time, let me turn the mic over to John.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: At this time I would like to ask Barbara Hairfield, chair from the South Carolina Council for the Social Studies, representing the credentials committee. And Barbara will introduce members of the credentials committee and read the committee report.

Barbara?

BARBARA HAIRFIELD, SOUTH CAROLINA, CHAIR, CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE: Good morning, Dr. Moore, Madam Chair, and members of the House of Delegates Steering Committee. I would like to once again recognize and thank Ana Post and Jordan Grote of NCSS for all the work and dedication that they have done with the credentials committee this year.

As chair of the credentials committee, I am pleased to report that there are 138 delegates are registered and certified to vote in the House of Delegates by 8:09 a.m. today, Saturday, November 17th, 2012. On behalf of the credentials committee, I move the adoption of the credentials report.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you, Barbara. It is moved to adopt the credentials committee report. Those in favor say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Those opposed say no. The ayes have it. The credentials committee report is adopted.

Okay, I will now turn this session back over to Maria Sanelli, chair of the steering committee.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: At this time if you would pull out your blue ballot. At this time, before we actually take a vote, I just want to have the individuals that are on the ballot just to stand up and be recognized before we take the vote.

For the steering committee \x97 actually I should say this before we start. There were two individuals that were nominated yesterday that the house rules actually do not allow them to run. If you are on the board at this time or you are on one of the three committees, you can't run even if you're cycling off for next year. And those rules are in the House of Delegates manual, okay? So the names you have are all people that are qualified to run.

And at this time if I could have Ken stand up and just wave. There's Ken. And Tim? And there's Tim. Those are the two individuals that are going to be running for the steering committee. Next slide.

Nominees for the resolutions committee. Can I have Diane stand up, please? Diane is in the back. Bradley? Over there in the back. Stay up there, Bradley. Very good. They just turned their head. They got you. Okay. Scott? Was Scott taken off?

[Simultaneous speaking.]

ATTENDEE: Scott's not on it.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Okay. Scott is eligible.

ATTENDEE: You'll have to ask him.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Okay. Scott, where are you? Okay, Scott is on a committee at this time so his name had to be stricken. And we've talked about that already. Thank you, Scott.

ATTENDEE: Gloria should have come off too.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Yeah, Gloria's name has to come off too.

And Lynn [ph], if you'd please stand up, please. Lynn is over there. Okay, thank you. Next slide?

Okay, Gloria is also on a committee so her name had to come off. Okay, would you please \x97 we will not count a vote for Gloria, so if you would please make a note on your ballot. Gloria can't run.

At this time if Jerome would stand up, please? So Jerome is in the middle. There he is. Thank you. Rozella is in the front row. Okay? And John Hines. John is over there. Okay, thank you.

I just wanted you to remember. Yesterday it was very quick when we had everybody stand up and go to the mic.

At this time I need you to mark your ballots. If you look at the directions it says you need to vote for two in each category. In some cases there are only two candidates, so that's easy, but we do need you to mark the ballots. We need two. You just need to put an X in the box.

At this time members of the steering committee, also board of directors, India [ph] \x97 if you guys could help us as well collect the ballots. Members of resolutions, assignments that are in the back, this is when we need you to help us out.

[Pause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: At this time, please, let's have the only people standing be people collecting ballots, and if everyone else can just wait one moment to get your coffee. All ballots should be given to Gloria. Those board members that are helping us, Gloria is in the red top in the back of the room with Ana.

It appears that all ballots have been collected. Anyone else have a ballot? Please hold it up high. Thank you very much.

During the next half an hour or so, Gloria will be busy in the back of the room with Ana and Kathy tallying the ballots. And I need to announce the new committee members that are elected. If you are so fortunate, we need you to meet in the front of the ballroom immediately after the House of Delegates session.

At this time I would like to start the resolution process and the adoption of the resolutions. Let me remind everyone the delegates \x97 if there's anyone at this time that does not have a copy of the resolutions, would you please raise your hand so that I can have a member or the steering committee bring you a list of resolutions? India, could you help us out? Thank you. The resolutions would be in the back of the room.

We'll get to you in one minute. I'll ask you to raise your hand again once they get those. Thank you.

In the interest of time, we prefer not to edit resolutions on the fly; to change grammar, syntax, punctuation or any other minor changes. I will tell you that the resolutions committee spent a lot of time debating commas and dangling participles and all of those good things and we did the best we could. But we will improve that if need be, but we prefer not to use floor time today to battle over where the comma goes in a sentence. NCSS staff will catch these types of errors after we're finished, to the resolutions, and the resolutions go to the board of directors for the March meeting.

You will notice that if there are any amendments to the resolutions, we will be typing them right on the computers as we go live. We have two computers up here. We generally type \x97 we listen to the amendment and we type it on the opposite computer. You won't see us typing at first. And then we'll switch back and forth between computers. So we're getting what you say and we have two people on computers to take care of that up here at the podium.

All right, at this time I'm going to turn over the resolution process \x97 oh, I need hands. People that need resolutions copy, hands up? Thank you. Thank you, board members, for stepping up and helping.

At this time I'm going to turn over the podium to our president, John Moore, and our chair of the resolutions committee, Leigh Sullivan. Thank you.

LEIGH SULLIVAN, ARKANSAS, CHAIR, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: Are you ready, Mr. Moore?

All right, on bullying is Resolution No. 1, "Be it resolved that the National Council for the Social Studies support the efforts of educators, parents, students, school districts, national and local governments, government agencies, and private anti-bullying organizations by publicizing anti-bullying policies, post-bullying enforcement, and prevention programs in available media and publications, and encourage local councils to also publicize and link with websites that present information, programs, and lesson plans that assist in this effort." And the resolution committee moves that this resolution be adopted.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Resolution No. 1 on bullying has been moved.

ATTENDEE: I second.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Is there any debate?

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: I would like to speak. This resolution \x97

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay, would you state your name and council, please?

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: Oh, my name is Carolyn Herbst.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: And your council.

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: And I'm a delegate from Association of Teachers of Social Studies, UFT in New York City, which is in New York State.

This resolution was initiated originally by last year's president of the New York State Council for the Social Studies. And we passed it at our business meeting in the spring of last year. And we edited it slightly and it went through the board at ATSS/UFT in New York City and then the board at the New York State Council for the Social Studies. And there was additional editing at the hearings yesterday.

If you're not familiar enough with this issue because it hasn't come up in your district, there are numerous websites you could look at. And also there's a film called "Bully" that I noticed was on the movie menu in my hotel, and you could take a look and see if it's on in yours.

This is a serious problem, and I think, as a social studies council, it is a social studies issue and we should be working towards dealing with it. So I would recommend that you adopt this resolution.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. All right, thank you.

State your name and \x97

BRIAN CUSHING, MAINE: Yes, my name is Brian Cushing. I'm the representative from the Maine Council for the Social Studies.

And I hope this doesn't fall into the category of minutiae, but I know that our state government is heavily involved in this issue in Maine, and should the language say "efforts of educators, parents, students, school districts, national, state, and local government agencies," or is it implied that "state" is local?

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay, so you need to \x97 is there a motion to amend the resolution? And if so, make your motion.

BRIAN CUSHING, MAINE: This is Brian Cushing again. I move that we amend the motion to include "state" as an agency.

ATTENDEE: Second.

ATTENDEE: Second.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay, it's been moved to insert "state," before "national"?

ATTENDEE: After.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Or after "national." Okay. Is there any discussion on the motion? Okay. All in favor of including "state" after national say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All opposed \x97

ATTENDEE: No.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: \x97 say no. Ayes have it. So there is an amendment that has passed to this motion.

Okay, is there any further debate or discussion on the motion, which has been amended? Okay, hearing none, all in favor of adopting Resolution No. 1 on bullying say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All opposed say no. The ayes have it and the resolution is adopted.

Leigh?

LEIGH SULLIVAN, ARKANSAS, CHAIR, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: Supporting a legislative liaison in each NCSS affiliated state and local council, Resolution No. 2. "Be it resolved that NCSS staff and members of the NCSS government and public relations committee consider the preparation of a document describing the roles, duties, and strategies state and local councils may need to know to effectively establish such positions.

"And be it further resolved that NCSS consider designating a particular staff person or elected NCSS officer to help legislative liaisons navigate the federal, state, and local legislative systems as needed and to publicize that position through the NCSS website and publications."

And the resolution committee moves that this resolution be adopted.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. All right. Thank you, Leigh, for the reading of Resolution No. 2.

Okay, the Resolution No. 2 supporting a legislative liaison in each NCSS-affiliated state and local council has been presented to the house. Is there any debate or discussion?

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: I would like to speak.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay.

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT, New York City.

At this point you might be wondering why ATSS/UFT and NYSCSS have all these resolutions to present. And it's because New York State Council for the Social Studies has a board position called resolutions chair, and I'm it. So I know that at the first meeting of ATSS/UFT and New York State Council for the Social Studies full board meetings, I have my resolutions ready. So we had proceeded the way we have in previous years, and I have the resolutions.

It came to my attention when we did the summer webinar on advocacy for legislative advocacy that there didn't seem to be all that many names listed of people that were listed in the affiliation papers as legislative liaisons. And I thought that this would be a resolution that would assist councils so that your councils have them.

And those that have them and are not listing them because they have some other title \x97 like in New York City it's basically the special projects coordinator but the special projects coordinator does legislative things like this, so we list it in our affiliation papers. And if you're not, well, that's simple, but if you're not because you're a little \x97

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Twenty more seconds.

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: \x97 reluctant to do it \x97

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Twenty seconds.

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: \x97 this will help. And so I urge you pass this.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Okay, thank you.

All right, name please?

MELISSA COLLUM, WISCONSIN, NCSS BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Thank you, President Moore. Melissa Collum, Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies, National Board member. I'm going to speak on behalf of both positions.

First, as a Wisconsin Council member, we do have a legislative liaison but it is not listed because we are a small council and that person serves many positions. I think that this resolution is redundant and it does not need to be passed. Many of our state councils already do this.

Also, we as councils receive SmartBriefs. We are already receiving all this information and it's already being done. I feel that this is putting an undue burden on our staff and it doesn't need to be done. And that's on behalf of my NCSS board position. Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Thank you. All right.

PEGGY JACKSON, NEW MEXICO, NCSS BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Peggy Jackson, NCSS Board of Directors. I want to concur some of the things that Melissa said. We have a staffer who works through this process and that is Ana Post.

This year on Thursday, for three hours, we had legislative advocacy session and training by Catriona McDonald, who is our lobbyist in D.C. And I believe what the intent of this resolution is, that we carry the idea of legislative liaisons all the way down to our local district. When we are beginning to train top-down, what we need to do and how we need to do it, that's the intent.

And when you decide your voting, I can't say how to vote but I do want to say that we already have some of this well in process. And to be a part of this \x97 since advocacy is my hat that I wear \x97 I work hard with my state legislature, I go to testify to the Education Committee in both the House and the Senate, and I've received that training through NCSS. Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay.

BRENT HEATH, CALIFORNIA: Yeah, my name is Brent Heath. I'm president of the California Council for the Social Studies.

Our state person, our government relations person, is so busy taking care of state business, and it's very complex these days, as I'm sure it is in most of your states, that if this position was created and you want our person to do this, it would be more of a filtering mechanism just passing on information.

Our state issues are so complex and so deep that it's very difficult for our person to be able to have the time to do this. And so I'm not telling you how to vote, but I\x92m just saying it is one more layer that we need to think about.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Okay, now here's \x97 I beg your pardon?

ATTENDEE: There are a few more people.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: I know. What I would like to do, though, for structure and organization, this would be the "in favor" mic and this will be the "against" mic, okay? And that way we can obtain an idea before you even speak just what we can expect here as far as conversation.

Okay, "in favor" mic?

ROZELLA CLYDE, ATSS/UFT: Yes.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay.

ROZELLA CLYDE, ATSS/UFT: Rozella Clyde, ATSS/UFT. NCSS has been an advocacy organization for many, many years. And those of us who have been involved in this for a long time really do have a pretty clear understanding because we have been trained. But we're looking at growth, we're looking at bringing in under-represented populations, we're looking at having, across the state and national arena, new people coming in to positions where they have to be advocates also.

So what this resolution speaks to is to creating a job description for those people who are going to take this responsibility. So I think we have to think beyond who we are and where we are right now to those new people that we're recruiting and bringing in, in our state and local councils as well as our national council, that there's something in print that helps them to understand what the job is.

We already have all this wonderful stuff that we're doing, but we can't just rely upon our own lived experience. We have to put things out there that younger people can pick up and then run with.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. All right.

GAYLE THIEMAN, INTERNATIONAL ASSEMBLY: Gayle Thieman, representing International Assembly. I'm also from Washington and Oregon Councils for Social Studies but not a delegate. I want to speak in favor of this resolution.

As we all know, resolutions passed by the House of Delegates are advisory to the NCSS Board of Directors that makes the final decisions about budgeting and about staff allocation. However, a positive vote from the House of Delegates sends a very strong message to the board of directors that advocacy is one of our highest priorities. You already mentioned yesterday, President Moore, about the five strategic priorities of NCSS. Advocacy is one of them.

And what we know is that there are strong councils that have been doing fabulous work with advocacy for many, many years, and there are councils with brand-new officer slates and there is no historical memory or training, and this is the role of the National Council for the Social Studies, to work with our affiliate councils and associated groups on advocacy. I urge you to support this resolution.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Thank you. Okay, all right. All right, is there any further debate on Resolution No. 2? Hearing none, we will do a voice vote on Resolution No. 2, and the motion, Resolution No. 2: Supporting a legislative liaison in each NCSS-affiliated state and local council. All of those in favor say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All of those opposed say no.

[Chorus of nays.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay, we will need to take a standing vote on motion \x97 I mean Resolution No. 2. Okay. All right.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: At this time, could I have members of the steering committee, board of directors, anyone that's helping in the back? We need to count people standing. So if you each \x97 we have Michelle is going to count in the first section. In the second section we have two board members. In the third section \x97 okay, it looks like we're ready to go.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Okay, I will read the resolution one more time and then I will ask for those in favor to stand.

Resolution No. 2 reads: Supporting a legislative liaison in each NCSS-affiliated state and local council. All of those in favor, please stand.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: If I could have one representative from each section come up to me and give me your total number, I will add up the three sections.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: They are all in favor. In favor.

ATTENDEE: [Speaking off mic.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: To Maria.

[Pause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right, you may be seated. Thank you.

Okay, all of those opposed Resolution No. 2, supporting a legislative liaison in each NCSS-affiliated state and local council, please stand.

And Chair Sanelli will hand me the results of the count, the actual count. Okay, and if you would just give me the results, then I will \x97

[Simultaneous speaking.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: What, abstention? Abstentions are not votes.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: According to our parliamentarian.

ATTENDEE: [Speaking off mic.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: According to our parliamentarian.

[Simultaneous speaking.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. I just need your totals, okay? And the total: Yes, 75; no, 42. The motion passes. I mean, the resolution passes. [Sounds gavel.] Thanks.

[Applause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Thank you.

All right Leigh, thank you. Resolution 3.

LEIGH SULLIVAN, ARKANSAS, CHAIR, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: Citizenship for the 21st Century, Resolution No. 3. "Be it resolved that NCSS continue to collaborate with Partnership for 21st Century Skills, the Civil Mission of Schools, and other additional germane organizations to explore and address the issues of citizenship education for the 21st century.

"And be it further resolved that any future social studies content standards reflect the knowledge and outcome of the exploration of how civic learning is key to 21st Century Skills.

"And be it further resolved that NCSS publicize the ongoing efforts of this exploration and collaboration through all available media."

The resolution committee moves that this resolution be adopted.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. It has been moved that Resolution No. 3, Citizenship for the 21st Century, be adopted. Is there any debate on Resolution No. 3? The "for" \x97

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: I wish to speak.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Just a minute. The "for" microphone is on this side; the "against" microphone on this side. Two-minute limit on your discussions.

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: Carolyn Herbst.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Who is the time-keeper for the \x97

ATTENDEE: [Speaking off mic.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay, you will be the timekeeper. Two minutes. And you will receive a 30-second warning.

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: Okay.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay.

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: Carolyn Herbst, ATSS/UFT. This made the same progression in the city and state boards and was also edited at the hearings yesterday.

I will call your attention to Isidore Starr's speech yesterday. I will tell you that a lot of the things in this resolution look like 20th century, but if we have the kind of problems we do in this country right now in terms of the way we deal with elections, social studies issues and whatever, we need them for the 21st century too. And so they are listed as 21st Century Skills.

I urge you to pass this. We have been working with the Civic Mission for Schools in the past. We want to work with them and other organizations as well, and this will move us forward to continue that good work. I urge that you pass it. Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right.

MICHAEL BOUCHER, INDIANA: Michael Boucher \x97

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Well, wait just a minute. Equal time.

MICHAEL BOUCHER, INDIANA: Oh, sorry.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: So we will hear from the other side of the room for "against" discussion and then we'll go back on the other side for "for" for balance of discussion. Okay?

RUBY HILL, NEW HAMPSHIRE: Ruby Hill from New Hampshire. And I don't want to see any one subject within our subject area elevated above the others. I feel like English, science and math are already elevated above us and we don't need division within our area.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right.

MICHAEL BOUCHER, INDIANA: Michael Boucher, Indiana Council for the Social Studies.

The 21st Century Skills and the Civic Mission of Schools have both given us excellent frameworks for our discussions about curriculum here in NCSS, and I would urge that it be passed.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. All right.

PEGGY ALTOFF, COLORADO: Peggy Altoff, Colorado.

It seems like a superfluous redundancy to me. I think that this has been the entire mission of the National Council for the Social Studies since its inception. We work toward making students competent citizens, and we've cooperated with each and every organization for as long as I've been part of NCSS. And I would agree with the woman who spoke before me. I'm not sure why we would elevate civics above the others.

But basically we've been doing it. We will continue to do it. As the first line says, "continue to collaborate." And I don't think that we need another resolution to confirm what we've been doing for years.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay.

MICHELLE HERCZOG, CALIFORNIA, NCSS VICE PRESIDENT: Thank you, Mr. President. Michelle Herczog, vice president, NCSS.

I think it's a wonderful resolution and it really confirms a number of things; first of all, why we are stronger by building coalitions, particularly in formal ways and giving credibility to different efforts.


The Partnership for 21st Century Skills is a national initiative that promotes the integration of the four "Cs," that they qualify as critical thinking and problem solving, creativity and innovation, communication skills, and collaboration skills, all of which are inherent in developing 21st century citizens.

We had a wonderful session yesterday. The P-21 executive director, Helen Soul\xE9, flew out from Washington, D.C. She's been meeting with Ted McConnell, executive director of the Civic Mission of Schools, and Susan Griffin. That partnership has begun. In fact, this year during Constitution Day, a joint effort and article was written, "What Citizenship Means for the 21st Century." I have copies of it here I can leave back there for you.

So, yes, I think (a) it's important to strengthen and build and give credibility to these built coalitions. It's a win-win for all, and it sends a strong message of support to the partnership for 21st Century Skills, folks, that we are firmly committed to that work.

They just received a big Hewlett grant dedicated to redefining citizenship in the 21st Century Skills. We need to be part of that work. We need to work with them to define that, and we need to show our support by strengthening our collaboration through resolution like this, so I thank whoever for moving this forward. Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Let me interject. Our executive director wants to clarify something that she missed.

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: I skipped a slide this morning, and the slide talks about our collaboration with P21 and other and other organizations, our Connected Learning Coalition, certainly the Civic Mission of Schools who is housed at National Council for the Social Studies, so I wanted to just make sure that you are aware that we currently have a collaboration with P21 and the Civic Mission of Schools, as well as our sister organizations, National Council of Teachers of English, Teachers of Math, the National Science Teachers Association, the Association of Career and Technical Education. So we are reaching out and collaborating with other organizations, and I skipped that slide. Sorry.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Thank you. Thank you, Susan.

All right. Sir?

MARC BRASOF, PENNSYLVANIA: Hello. My name is Marc Brasof from the Pennsylvania Council for Social Studies. I'm also an Education Fellow at the National Constitution Center.

I disagree with my colleagues about this being redundant. If you look at the NCSS strands in 2010, most of it is history. There is only one strand that really is dedicated to civics, and so I do think that this needs to be expanded on.

Second thing, if we are going to encourage authentic assessments, I think that it should "skills, knowledge, and dispositions," to add the "dispositions." It just says "outcomes," and so that we can also look at values and behaviors, as well.

And then the other thought was in considering ethical decision-making as also part of the framework, as well.

Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Are you making an amendment?

MARC BRASOF, PENNSYLVANIA: Oh, yeah. This is my first time. I'd like to move to amend and \x97 what does it say? I can't find it at the moment where it says "outcomes."

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. It is clear that you are in favor of this resolution.

MARC BRASOF, PENNSYLVANIA: Yes, I am very in favor of it, but I would like it to be amended.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Now let's go back. Just go ahead and make your amendment. There is really no need for you to even point out that you are in favor. You are on that favor side, and so go ahead and make your amendments.

MARC BRASOF, PENNSYLVANIA: I would like to move to amend the second, where it says "resolved," and it says "social studies, conduct standards, reflect the knowledge and outcomes," and I would like to amend it to "knowledge, skills, and dispositions," so that "dispositions" is included.

Do I do the other amendment, or do I wait?

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Our parliamentarian?

ATTENDEE: [Speaking off mic.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. So you are moving to strike "knowledge and outcomes" \x97

MARC BRASOF, PENNSYLVANIA: Correct.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: \x97 and to insert "knowledge, skills, and dispositions."

MARC BRASOF, PENNSYLVANIA: Yes, sir.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Is that correct?

MARC BRASOF, PENNSYLVANIA: Yes, sir.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. That's your motion. Is there a second?

ATTENDEE: Second.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. We're going to show it. It has been moved and seconded.

Is there any discussion on the amendment?

ATTENDEE: Point of order.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: What is your point of order?

ATTENDEE: Point of order is according Robert's Rules of Order and my understanding of it, sir, is that you need to ask the writer of the resolution to accept the friendly amendment.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Oh. There are no friendly amendments. No.

ATTENDEE: He's changing the wording of the resolution.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: The resolution is now owned by the House of Delegates, so the House of Delegates is the author of this resolution to be presented to the delegates now. It's been submitted to the House of Delegates Resolution Committee, and it's been scurrying through that committee, and now it's under the ownership of the House of Delegates.

ATTENDEE: Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Are there any other discussions on this amendment?

Hearing none, all of those in favor of the amendment, say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All of those opposed?

[Chorus of nays.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: A standing on this amendment. All in favor, please rise. Standing without \x97 on the amendment. Just without counting, just let's see. You don't have to count. We're just trying to stand to see what the majority of the room looks like.

All right. Please be seated. All of those opposed, please stand and rise.

All right. We will count. Stay, those who are opposed. You count first, since you're up. If you're opposed. Opposed, opposition, please count for the opposition of the amendment.

[Pause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. You may be seated. Thank you.

Those in favor of this amendment, please stand.

[Pause.]

ATTENDEE: Are you standing?

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: I'm abstaining. I'm not voting.

ATTENDEE: You're standing, though.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Let me sit down.

[Laughter.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Here are the results. You may be seated. Thank you. 60 yes, 47 no to the amendment. To the amendment. So the amendment passes, and so let's go back \x97

MARC BRASOF, PENNSYLVANIA: Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right, yes. Now we need to go ahead and discuss \x97 we've had 10 minutes on the main resolution. We have two people. All right. Ten minutes total \x97

ATTENDEE: May I make a short comment supporting this?

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Just a minute, ma'am.

ATTENDEE: Okay.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. We do have enough time. You are the only one that's left. Are you standing?

ATTENDEE: No. I figure I am going to be counting so I'm just going to go ahead and stand.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. I thought you were standing to say something. All right. So we just have one more person that would like to discuss. Let's see. This is the in-favor side?

ARLENE GARDNER, NEW JERSEY: Yes, yes.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Go ahead. And your name?

ARLENE GARDNER, NEW JERSEY: Okay. I am Arlene Gardner. I am the council president in New Jersey.

I think this is a good idea, and I wanted to try to take away any concerns that this is elevating, civic education above anything else, because I don't think in any way it is doing that.

I think what it's trying to reflect is the fact of why are we teaching social studies altogether, and that is the civic mission of the schools to create citizens. I think that's all that is in here, and I just thought it was important to clarify that, because if that was anyone's concern, they shouldn't be concerned about that. This is our goal of social studies. Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Is there any further discussion on Resolution No. 3? One more. Against.

MICHELLE McLAUGHLIN, CS4, : Michelle McLaughlin, representing CS4.

Just to tap into the last statement on the support against this, then the division between the disciplines, it may, if this is a document our states use when they want information on grants and legislation and monies that are funding certain things in social studies we found in our state that it does elevate one discipline above the other, particularly when it comes to funding.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Hearing no further discussion, let's vote on the Resolution No. 3 that has been amended, and Resolution No. 3 title is "Citizenship for the 21st Century." All of those in favor of Resolution No. 3, Citizenship for the 21st Century, say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All of those opposed Resolution No. 3, say no.

[Chorus of nays.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. We need a standing vote. Let's go ahead and stand. All of those in favor of the motion stand.

[Pause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. You may be seated. Sit, please.

All right. I am not asking anyone to stand against this motion until I see more people sitting down, because there are a lot of people that are still standing, and I can't really tell if you are finished. Okay.

The only ones that are standing are the counters, all right? Okay. Those against this resolution, please stand.

[Pause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Resolution No. 3 results. The vote for yes is 71. Vote for no is 42. This motion, Resolution No. 3, Citizenship for the 21st Century, with the amendment, passes.

We have an interruption from our House of Delegates Steering Committee Chair, Maria Sanelli.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: The good news is we don't have slates and chisels to take care of this, but we do have a tie for Resolutions Committee. So at this time, you will find Gloria and Kathy going around and giving a little white piece of recycled paper, and I need you to vote for one person, either Diane or Bradley, for Resolutions Committee.

When you are finished writing "Diane" or "Bradley" on that little piece of paper, if you would fold it in half, and board members will be coming around and collecting them. Don't fold it. Don't fold it. It's not a secret. Everybody is going to know as you pass it over. God forbid.

[Laughter.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: We don't want to unfold them. Yes.

[Simultaneous speaking.]

ATTENDEE: Maria? Maria?

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: At this point, I could read them to you, okay?

ATTENDEE: Maria? Maria? Could you say the names of the candidates?

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: I want to recognize Anna.

ATTENDEE: Could you say the names of the candidates again?

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Pardon?

ATTENDEE: Could you say the names of the candidates again?

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: They're on the board. Here we go.

So let me read the description again. Diane has down that she is co-chair of the Assessment Community. She wrote conference proposals for ECE and Assessment Communities. She has NCSS and HOD experience, an active member on CUFA, NCSS, and SSA for years, a CUFA presenter this year. It's her third year as a faculty senator at CSU-San Bernardino, a graduate coordinator, as well as conducts research and published work in the area of social studies, assessment, and instruction.

Bradley. Council-affiliated experience, 2011 Resolutions Committee, 2010 KCSS president, 2008 KCSS conference program chair, has HOD experience as the 2011 Resolutions chair, Resolutions chair member, seven-time delegate to HOD, associate professor at Kansas State University, associate director of KSV Center of Social Studies education. So those are Diane and Bradley. If you please write one of those names, and please do not fold the sheet of paper.

If you still have your ballot, would you please raise your hand with your ballot. Members of the Board of Directors and the Steering Committee will come around and collect those.

At this time, if you have any problems with the voting, raise your hand. Hanging chads, that's what I was thinking. We will come around and help you, but I am going to turn the podium back over to our president, John Moore. We have four more resolutions. Thank you very much.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. I would like to turn the microphone back over to our chair, Leigh, so that she can read the Resolution No. 4 on the authentic assessment. Thank you.

LEIGH SULLIVAN, ARKANSAS, CHAIR, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: On authentic assessment, Resolution No. 4, resolve the National Council for the Social Studies facilitate the use of authentic assessment evaluative devices in our schools through the organization of a database of effective and meaningful performance assessment activities, useful for the social studies course content, including evaluative rubrics, implementation strategies, and links to examples and resources. And be it further resolved, the National Council for the Social Studies assemble information for local councils on how to encourage state legislatures to require the use of performance-based alternative assessment options for all students as exit strategies as students move from one level of education to the next through graduation.

The Resolutions Committee moves that Resolution No. 4 be adopted.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Thank you, Chair Sullivan.

Resolution No. 4 on authentic assessment is up for debate or discussion. We will begin with this side, a statement or discussion item for the resolution and then go over on the other side of the room. State your name and affiliation counsel please.

ATTENDEE: Rosella Clyde [ph], ATSS UFT.

I'd urge you to vote in favor of this resolution. This is a nationwide issue, but it's something that has to be handled on a state-by-state basis, and in a climate where more and more of our assessment is being based upon multiple choice, fill-in-the-dot questions, we as a council need to provide the ammunition and the support that local councils may use as they advocate for critical thinking assessments on a state-by-state basis.

Providing this information that is available to everybody, that gives us data that we can use, that gives us specific styles of assessment that are alternative to the multiple choice just provides us with the ammunition that we can use as we go to our state legislators.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you.

Sir.

THERON TRIMBLE, FLORIDA: Theron Trimble, Florida Council for the Social Studies.

Although I agree in principle with the resolution, I think that, number one, first of all, we have too many places. There is no assessment that has to be addressed, first, and, second, there is the reality you cannot continue to decrease staff at NCSS and add responsibilities. It is simply not practical, and we have to deal with the reality of the situation.

[Applause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Thank you.

MICHELLE HERCZOG, CALIFORNIA, NCSS VICE PRESIDENT: Thank you, Mr. President. Michelle Herczog, Vice President.

This is such a fantastic resolution, because it was also a very similar resolution that passed in this room a year ago in a different city, but you get the idea. And that resolution, which was passed by House of Delegates and is being acted on as we speak, is to create a clearinghouse of social studies, performance-based assessment examples, research and policies to inform policy practice. It speaks to the purpose of this, but I need to inform this group about what's gone on since then, because I think it's important when we look at this.

When we took that resolution back to board and we moved forward to create this clearinghouse, here was the issue that emerged. If we are going to create a clearinghouse of authentic assessment measures, performance assessment measures which we all know are powerful and useful, we do not have the resources to vet those, evaluate those, determine if they are truly effective or meaningful. What we are moving forward is creating a place where people can post links to them. We are working on developing criteria for states and locals to use to select their own, and the assessment community is working with us to finalize that and move forward.

So I'd like to offer an amendment to the resolution to clarify, speak to the purpose of it, but alleviate the concerns that extra staffing and responsibilities might incur. So can I do that? Yes? Okay.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Yes.

MICHELLE HERCZOG, CALIFORNIA, NCSS VICE PRESIDENT: All right. So the first be it resolved. Totally agree with this in purpose, but if we include the language "database of effective and meaningful performance assessment activities," the use of those words is going to prompt the need for somebody somewhere to determine what's effective and what's not.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. You have 10 seconds.

MICHELLE HERCZOG, CALIFORNIA, NCSS VICE PRESIDENT: So I'd like to strike the words "effective and meaningful" and just that we include "database of performance assessment activities." It will get to the nexus if what we want, and it will alleviate the need for somebody to have to vet all that.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Submit it in writing. Okay. You would need to submit it in writing.

MICHELLE HERCZOG, CALIFORNIA, NCSS VICE PRESIDENT: Say it again?

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right.

MICHELLE HERCZOG, CALIFORNIA, NCSS VICE PRESIDENT: Cross out the words "effective and meaningful," not that I don't believe, not that there's anything wrong with that, and instead of "evaluative rubrics," I would substitute the word "criteria" for "rubric," because we are already working on putting that together.

So you see where it says "including evaluative rubrics"? Instead, say "including evaluative criteria," and strike "implementation strategies." Those are all good things, but we don't have the horses to really do that work.

Other than that, I love it. Does that make sense to you guys?

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. The motion is to strike "effective and meaningful," "strike rubrics," and insert "criteria," and strike "implementation strategies." Once again, strike "effective and meaningful," strike "rubrics," and replace "rubrics" with "criteria," and strike "implementation strategies."

ATTENDEE: Is that correct, Michelle?

MICHELLE HERCZOG, CALIFORNIA, NCSS VICE-PRESIDENT: Yes. Thank you very much.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. You see the motion before you. Is there a second on this motion for the amendment?

ATTENDEE: Second.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. It's been moved and seconded. Are you ready to vote on the amendment? All right. All of those in favor of this amendment, please say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All of those opposed, say no.

[Chorus of nays.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay, ayes have it.

So now we are discussing Resolution No. 4 as you see before you that has been amended, and we will continue on this side now from a comment or discussion from \x97

DON GIFFORD, CS4: My name is Don Gifford. I am representing CS4. I am also a member of the Kansas Council, and I am also an employee of the state agency.

I would like to oppose an amendment to the resolution that we strike the words "require the" from the second paragraph and the word "alternative and then add a period after "students" and strike the remaining section. This is going to create an obstacle for state agencies as they advocate for performance-based assessment if we require it, and an alternative assessment is for special ed, which also causes these problems, and exit strategies will also cause state agencies difficulty in implementing any kind of change like that.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Could you repeat once more for our recorder?

DON GIFFORD, CS4: Sure. I would like to strike the word "require," "require the," and then strike the word "alternative," and then put a period after "students" and then strike the remainder of the sentence.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: "Students" where? Which one?

DON GIFFORD, CS4: Exit strategies, the first "students." We don't want to use exit strategies. That will cause us problems at least in Kansas. So the period should go after "options for all students," period. Encourage state legislatures to use, performance-based alternative assessment options for all students.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right.

DON GIFFORD, CS4: Eliminate "alternative." That's correct, and then the first period after the first "student." There you go, and strike the remainder of that sentence. And I believe that will help state agencies in dealing with this resolution.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. You have a motion to amend this resolution once again. Is there a second?

ATTENDEE: Second.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. It has been moved and seconded that we amend the motion as you see before you. All of those in favor \x96 okay. Any discussion on this amendment?

ATTENDEE: Yeah. I want to speak to the amendment, and the reason why I think the phrase "exit strategies" is crucial is because this is what we are looking at on a state level. We are looking at assessments not just in a classroom assessment, but we are looking at how do we evaluate students as they move from one level of education to another. That is where the battleground is. If we take out that phrase "exit strategies as students move," then we are talking about a totally different amendment, totally different resolution. It's talking about in class. It's not talking about moving students as they are evaluated for graduation, and that was my whole purpose in writing this resolution that has been approved by the Resolutions Committee. So I think it changes it tremendously and that it doesn't give us the kind of data that we need to use as we talk to the importance of performance-based assessments.

I also am opposed to taking out the word "alternative." Yes, that is used for special education populations, but it's also used for other kinds of populations, and I really think we need to talk about different kinds of assessment, and that's all alternative is. So I strongly oppose the elimination of require "alternative" and "exit strategies." Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Any other discussion on the amendment?

Hearing no discussion, all of those in favor of the amendment to this amended resolution, please say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All of those opposed, no?

[Chorus of nays.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: The ayes have it? Okay, let's take a standing vote quickly, please. All in favor, aye, stand. Say aye \x96 I mean not say aye. Stand. In favor of this amendment, stand, as amended on the second amendment. All right. You may be seated.

Those against the second amendment to this amended resolution. All right. The no's have it. It's clear. This amendment has been defeated. Okay.

All right. Now we're back to discussion of the resolution that has been with the first amendment. Let's go back on this side.

MARC BRASOF, PENNSYLVANIA: Mr. President, delegates, Marc Brasof again from the Pennsylvania Council.

The issue I am going to bring up, it may be a nuance, but I think it's important. I hold issue with the "whereas," where it says "ability to apply concepts, knowledge, and attitudes," and the reason why I hold issue to that is that that is considered lower order thinking skills, and how can we do authentic assessment if that is what we are going to be advocating for.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Are you looking at "whereas," or are you looking at the resolution? We are looking at the actual "Be it further resolved" statement. We are not looking at any "whereas."

MARC BRASOF, PENNSYLVANIA: We're still just at the "resolved"? I thought we moved on. Okay. Then my argument against this resolution is that this is the difference between asking students to write what are the causes and consequences of World War I versus having students evaluate of those causes and consequences are legitimate explanations of what happened, and so we are still emphasizing lower order thinking skills with the authentic assessment resolution.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Peggy.

PEGGY ALTOFF, COLORADO: Peggy Altoff, Colorado, and I am speaking in opposition.

I first want to thank Michelle Herczog for clarifying that the board is already working on last year's resolution, and I think we should give them the opportunity to pursue that and to continue working on it.

I am very concerned about taking out "effective" and "meaningful." Why would we not want "effective" and "meaningful" performance assessment activities? Do we want ineffective and non-meaningful ones?

And if it's going to take staff time, as she put, horses to do the work \x97 and there aren't enough horses to do the work beyond the resolution from last year that's currently being worked on, why would we approve one that adds potentially additional work?

I am also concerned in the first "be it resolved" about "authentic assessment evaluative devices." To me, that term is very nebulous. What is an evaluative device? Some people could think of it as clickers. Other people could think of it as paper and pencil tests. I don't think this is clear. I'm also concerned what Don Gifford said about one state in the second part of the resolution having problems with what "alternative assessment" means and what "exit strategy" means, and another state, the one that put it forward having a different understanding of what those mean. If we don't have a common understanding, then we shouldn't be approving the resolution.

Thank you.

[Applause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Thank you.

We are way over the 10-minute allocation. We will take these two comments, and then we will take no others. The ones who are currently standing, we will take your discussion items and then no others. Come to the mic. All right. So go right ahead.

DIANE BRANTLEY, ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY: My name is Diane Brantley. I am the co-chair of the Assessment Community, and over the last few years, we have held sessions on critical issues and social studies assessment, and the room is usually full. Some of the questions and concerns being brought up is the lack of authentic assessment in the field of social studies.

In listening to our constituents who are attending NCSS, I guess I would say that the Assessment Community speaks in favor of this motion.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Thank you.

Go ahead.

BECKY GRIFFITH, NORTH CAROLINA: I am Becky Griffith, president of the North Carolina Council for the Social Studies.

As currently written, I am opposed to this. I support, though, the first "be it resolved." I think that that's doable. I think that creating a webpage and resources, online resources for our membership is valuable, but the second part, knowing that 46 states have already adopted the Common Core and all those 46 states are either going to belong to the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium or they are going to belong to the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, one or the other, all this is already being done out there in some form or fashion, or whatever they do in those two groups is going to directly impact what states do with assessment in all content areas.

Also, anytime you get into assessment, it's controversial, and it costs a lot of money, and states are going to do what they've got funding for. We are talking here about the next generation of assessments, the next generation of assessments. I think that word "alternative" too is controversial in one way, because alternative assessments could be performance-based versus paper and pencil or, as I think the other gentleman was referring to, alternative assessments could be for special needs students, so that's where that comes into play.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Thank you.

All right. Now we are ready to vote on Resolution No. 4, as amended. All of those in favor of Resolution No. 4, the amended resolution on authentic assessment, please say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All of those opposed, say no.

[Chorus of nays.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. The no's have it. Resolution No. 4 fails, and it's not accept by the House of Delegates.

Leigh Sullivan, if you would lead us in Resolution No. 5.

LEIGH SULLIVAN, ARKANSAS, CHAIR, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: Thank you, Dr. Moore.

Response to Hurricane Sandy is Resolution No. 5. Resolve that the NCSS House of Delegates and Executive Board through this resolution applaud the selfless sacrifice of the many first responders, including members of NCSS, their colleagues, family, and friends who offered assistance to those in need, and be it further resolved that NCSS supports the educators, students, and families who have been affected by Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. By directions of the Resolutions Committee, I move adoption of Resolution No. 5.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you, Leigh.

All right. Resolution No. 5, as you see, the Resolution No. 5, response to Hurricane Sandy, as presented by Chair Sullivan, is there any discussion?

ATTENDEE: Yes, please.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: For or against? Okay. We will begin on this side. Let's begin with an opposed on one side.

SUSAN LOCKLEAR, TEXAS: Susan Locklear. I am president of the Texas Council.

I am not opposed to it at all, but I do have a question. In the second "resolved" where it says that NCSS supports, I need to know what you mean by support. How far does that go?

ATTENDEE: Does the chair of the Resolutions Committee want to answer that, or should I? Because we discussed this in the hearings.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. All right. Thank you for your discussion or your item there.

ATTENDEE: Originally, I asked that we could do some indication of how to make monetary donations or service donations, and we removed that. Anyway you feel committed to support, support, okay, and then what the word "support" is, that's your personal conscience on how you want to do the support. But the word "support" will cover all of this.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Time.

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: Carolyn Herbst, again, ATSS UFT. And as chair of the two councils' Resolution Committee, I wrote this while we were experiencing Hurricane Sandy. I fortunately lived in a neighborhood that was not affected at all, except some of the restaurants were running out of exotic food, because we couldn't get out of that area.

I was attuned to the news coming in, and I said we've got to do something about this, so that NCSS recognizes it in some way. I e-mailed everyone on the executive boards of the city and state councils and asked for approval of the resolution, and anybody who had power responded. And I'd like to \x96 so our members do not have power, a lot of our members didn't have power.

I'd like you to read two responses:. "A small but very significant way to show our support for our colleagues in school communities," sincerely Nancy McGuire, president, Mid-Hudson Council for the Social Studies \x97

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: You have 20 seconds, 20 seconds.

CAROLYN HERBST, NEW YORK- ATSS/UFT: \x97 and most touching. "Glad you thought of it. The South Shore of Long Island is destroyed. We have students whose homes were lost, or where damage was so severe, the houses may have to be bulldozed. My own home is unlivable" \x97

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Time. Time.

CAROLYUN HERBST: \x97 "and will probably be months before I am able to back these words, and it looks like a tsunami hit," and this word is from Long Island Council for the Social Studies.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Time. Thank you. Thank you. All right.

ATTENDEE: Good morning.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: No. We have one on the other side here.

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: I am Sue Blanchette from the Texas delegation, past president of NCSS.

I'd like to offer an amendment to this that might clarify things a little bit. On the second "resolved," that it should read that NCSS members support educators and student and families who have been affected by Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath in any way that their conscience demands, or something of that. The last part is a little unclear, but I basically am offering the amendment to insert the word "members" after NCSS.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. You need to present that in a motion, please.

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: Yes. I am offering a motion that we change the second "resolve" to read that, "NCSS members support educators," rather than committing the organization. I would say the members support them as they see fit.

ATTENDEE: Do you want to put it at the end?

SUE BLANCHETTE, TEXAS, NCSS PAST PRESIDENT: Yes. Put it at the end.

ATTENDEE: Second.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. All right. It's been moved. Is there a second?

ATTENDEE: Second.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Is there a discussion on the amendment? Any discussion of the amendment?

All right. We need a voice vote. As you can see, the amendment appears before you that NCSS members support the educators, students, and families who have been affected by Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath as they see fit. All of those in favor of this amended resolution, say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Oh, I'm sorry. All of those in favor of the amendment to this Resolution 5, say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: We are only voting on the amendment right now.

All of those against the amendment?

All right. Say no. Opposition? No?

All right. The amendment passes, and so we will now go back to about 5 more minutes, a discussion on this amended Resolution No. 5, as you see before you.

BOB DYTELL, ATSS/UFT: Bob Dytell, ATSS UFT, New York City.

I would just like to change where it says "Hurricane" to "Hurricane/Tropical Storm Sandy," and the reason why, I need to give you this information. Do what you want with it. The reason why is that insurance companies in New York and New Jersey apparently want to call it a "hurricane," but the winds were under 75 miles an hour, and to collect insurance, I think it was called a "tropical storm" in most areas in the New York area. And I don't want some insurance company to pick this up and say, "We're not going to pay on this." That's all.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Are you wanting an amendment to this, or is this how you feel about this? All right. Go back to the mic and make your amendment, and we will consider it.

BOB DYTELL, ATSS/UFT: Very simply, just change it to "Hurricane/Tropical Storm."

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Is there a second on this amendment to this original amendment?

ATTENDEE: Second.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. It's been moved and seconded that we add "Hurricane"\x97 I mean "Tropical Storms" to this, insert it or just slash it, "Hurricane/Tropical Storm." All right.

It has been moved and seconded. Any discussion on this second amendment?

ATTENDEE: Call to question.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Call to question. If there's no discussion, we will go ahead and present for a vote. All of those in favor of this second amendment to the Resolution No. 5, say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All of those opposed, say no?

[Chorus of nays.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Ayes have it.

We will spend about 2 more minutes, because that was 5 when you got up, sir, from New York, and so now just 2 more minutes. Those who are standing at the mic, you will have an opportunity to speak. After you are finished with your discussion, we will vote on the amended Resolution No. 5.

Sir.

KELLY CARTWRIGHT, OKLAHOMA AND CS4: Kelly Cartwright, president of the Oklahoma Council, member CS4, State Department of Ed in Oklahoma. I would move to call the question.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Is there a second call to question?

ATTENDEE: Second.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Second. Two-thirds vote. If two-thirds vote stands. All in favor, please rise. Please stand. At the end of this debate, caught a question. Two-thirds rise. Okay, two-thirds. Please be seated. Quickly seated. Quickly seated.

All of those opposed , stand, please. All opposed of ending debate, please stand.

Okay. So we will proceed to vote on the motion as amended.

Now we are ready to vote on Resolution No. 5, as you see before you, with the amendments. There are two amendments, and you can read and present. All of those in favor of Resolution No. 5, response to Hurricane/Tropical Storm Sandy, say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All of those opposed to this Resolution No. 5, say no.

[Chorus of nays.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Okay. Ayes have it. So Resolution No. 5 passes and is adopted as a resolution to be submitted to the Board of Directors. Thank you.

All right. Chair Leigh Sullivan.

LEIGH SULLIVAN, ARKANSAS, CHAIR, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: Our final two resolutions are courtesy resolutions. Resolution No. 6, be it resolved that the National Council for the Social Studies formally recognizes and thanks John Moore for his service and value to all in the social studies community and especially the NCSS membership. By direction of the Resolutions Committee, I move adoption of Resolution No. 6.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. You see Resolution No. 6 has been presented before you.

ATTENDEE: Second.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Any discussion on this or debate on this?

All right. All in favor, say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

[Applause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you. Thank you. It's my pleasure. My pleasure. Thank you.

All opposed?

[No audible response.]

[Laughter.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Thank you very much. It's been my pleasure as well.

All right. Chair Leigh Sullivan.

LEIGH SULLIVAN, ARKANSAS, CHAIR, RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: Our final resolution is Resolution No. 7. Be it resolved that the National Council for the Social Studies expresses its profound thanks and appreciation to the Washington State Council for the Social Studies and the 2012 co-chairs for the Annual Conference, Lisa Clarke, Diane Hart, Margit McGuire, Tina Storer, and Gail Thieman.

By direction of the Resolutions Committee, I move adoption of Resolution No. 7.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Thank you, Chair Sullivan.

Resolution 7, as you have heard from Chair Sullivan, any discussion or debate on this resolution?

All right. All of those in favor of the resolution, say aye.

[Chorus of ayes.]

[Applause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All of those opposed, say no.

[No audible response.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: Ayes have it. The motion passes.

All right. I will turn the podium back over to Chair Maria Sanelli.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: All right. We are taking this home soon. Okay?


Let me remind you again, your goldenrod evaluation paper, we need that filled out, but at this time, it is my pleasure \x97 I know we don't have a slide right now, because you guys kept amending and re-amending. We didn't get a chance to make a slide during all that, but let me announce the new committee members for Assignments, Resolution, and Steering Committees.

Again, these candidates or these newly appointed people, would you please stay after the meeting and come up to the podium, so that we can talk to you. You can just find me or Gloria at the end, and we will talk to you at that time.

From the Steering Committee, the two new members of the Steering Committee are Ken deMasi and Tim Potts. Thank you very much for your service.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: The Resolutions Committee, the two new members will be Bradley Burnhide and Mary Lynn Romero.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: The two new members of the Assignment Committee will be John Hines and Jerome Hiner [ph]. Thank you.

[Applause.]

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Again, would those individuals after the meeting please come up to the podium.

Again, I remind you we need you to fill out your evaluation forms at this time, and I am going to turn over the mic to Susan because she's moving towards me.

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: And the reason I am moving towards Maria is to present this House of Delegates framed HOD manual, because we really appreciate her good, hard work on this committee and her leadership. Thank you, Maria.

[Applause.]

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: I want to make sure that the Golden Stars come up here and get your picture taken with President Moore.

MARIA SANELLI, MIDDLE STATES, CHAIR, STEERING COMMITTEE: Steering Committee members and Board of Directors, if you could go around and collect the yellow-goldenrod papers, if individuals are ready, and I cannot have you leave without filling out that piece of paper, please. If you are not finished, you are more than welcome to keep working on it. We have the room for another half an hour.

SUSAN GRIFFIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF NCSS: And make sure you ask Peggy Jackson about Rho Kappa.

PEGGY JACKSON, NEW MEXICO, NCSS BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Woohoo! Rho Kappa is what you want for your high school in your state to become the Honor Society for Social Studies. We have created over 100. Our goal is 500, and you could be a part of making this happen, a Social Studies Honor Society. Our chair of this group of Linda Massey from Texas, and we will be down right at the Exhibit Hall today until one o'clock in order to provide you with the information you need, or it's on the website. Thank you, Susan Griffin.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Are there any other announcements before I have final remarks or announcements? Any announcements? Other announcements?

On behalf of the membership of the National Council for Social Studies, officers, Board of Directors, and staff, I would like to personally thank you for your time and commitment that you have given to both sessions of our House of Delegates for this year, 2012. There are sessions that you had an opportunity to benefit from, but you have basically sacrificed your time and energy and thought processes to the House of Delegates, so I personally thank you for all components of NCSS.

It has been a pleasure for me to work with you, and I would like to remind you and invite you to continue to benefit and attend the remainder of the 92nd annual conference here in Seattle. We do have a slate of future speakers yet to come for today, and we will end with Jamie Ford tomorrow, so please, you're invited to continue to make the 92nd conference here in Seattle as beneficial for presenters as it is for those who are attending sessions.

We have already made an announcement about the collection of evaluation forms. We have an announcement from board member \x97

PEGGY JACKSON, NEW MEXICO, NCSS BOARD OF DIRECTORS: I just want to clarify. I made a mistake, first one ever, and we are out by \x97 for Rho Kappa, we're out by the poster sessions. We're right there. If you have a question or you want to know about Rho Kappa, see us there. Thank you.

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: All right. Rho Kappa.

All right. We are done right on time. We will see you in St. Louis with President-elect Steve Armstrong.

[Applause.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: And if you notice the blue buttons \x97 Steve, do you have any more?

STEVE ARMSTRONG, CONNECTICUT, NCSS PRESIDENT-ELECT: [Speaking off mic.]

JOHN MOORE, KENTUCKY, NCSS PRESIDENT: If you want buttons about St. Louis, go over and see Steve Armstrong. Registration opens in late June 2013. Take as many of these buttons home to your colleagues as well. Steve will give them out if you want buttons on St. Louis. Thank you so much. We're adjourned.

-- JordanGrote - 12 Apr 2013
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